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Old Aug 7th, 2009, 07:12 AM   51
Jody R
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Cash Point/Cash Machine (UK) - ATM (USA)

I couldn't care less (UK) - I could care less (USA)

Tube (UK) - Subway (USA)

Football (UK) - Soccer (USA)


One thing that always confuses me is that in the UK we write a date with day month and year (so today is 07/08/09) and my USA friends write it as month day and year (so to them today is 08/07/09).

Interestingly (to people like me and I am a bit of a nerd about these things) at 12:34:56 today 07/08/09 we had all the numbers 123456789 exactly in sequence.



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Old Aug 7th, 2009, 08:07 AM   52
channy3232
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Originally Posted by Jody R View Post
Cash Point/Cash Machine (UK) - ATM (USA)

I couldn't care less (UK) - I could care less (USA)

Tube (UK) - Subway (USA)

Football (UK) - Soccer (USA)


One thing that always confuses me is that in the UK we write a date with day month and year (so today is 07/08/09) and my USA friends write it as month day and year (so to them today is 08/07/09).

Interestingly (to people like me and I am a bit of a nerd about these things) at 12:34:56 today 07/08/09 we had all the numbers 123456789 exactly in sequence.

The couldn't care less thing isn't that Americans says it differently. There are just more idiots over here that can't figure out proper grammar! Sorry. That is actually one of my biggest pet peeves. Or when people say "my sister and myself..." what??? Do you say "myself went to the store" or when people write your instead of you're like "your welcome" or instead of "regardless of the situation..." they say "irregardless of the situation" irregardless isn't even a word!! Lol and I've heard politicians and lawyers use this "word"!! Drives me nuts. So yeah it's not that it's said differently over here, people just say it incorrectly!
Oh but one I've noticed is UK- "each to their own" US "to each their own"



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Old Aug 7th, 2009, 08:11 AM   53
channy3232
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Originally Posted by Cassandra View Post
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Originally Posted by Emma1980 View Post
Aubergine and eggplant
lol - i got this recently from playing FarmVille on facebook lol

I dont know any different names for american/english but i love the way the americans say Aluminium
Lol! You spell it completely differently too! 4 syllables. A-lum-i-num
and watch out cause farmville is addictive! That's why I've never started playing. I know I'll get hooked!



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Old Aug 7th, 2009, 10:55 AM   54
whiby
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I've often heard "herb" being pronounced "erb" - as in we would say "herbal tea" but on US tv programmes (that's another one - programmes and shows) they say "erbal tea". Sounds so odd. Do Americans spell it without the h or is it just that the h is silent? Oh another one - commercials and adverts.



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Old Aug 7th, 2009, 11:24 AM   55
Jody R
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Originally Posted by channy3232 View Post

The couldn't care less thing isn't that Americans says it differently. There are just more idiots over here that can't figure out proper grammar! Sorry. That is actually one of my biggest pet peeves. Or when people say "my sister and myself..." what??? Do you say "myself went to the store" or when people write your instead of you're like "your welcome" or instead of "regardless of the situation..." they say "irregardless of the situation" irregardless isn't even a word!! Lol and I've heard politicians and lawyers use this "word"!! Drives me nuts. So yeah it's not that it's said differently over here, people just say it incorrectly!
Oh but one I've noticed is UK- "each to their own" US "to each their own"
I didn't realise that, I just thought it was the way the expression was used by everyone. I've even seen it used that way in books and films. I don't like it either though lol.

Taxi (UK) - Cab (USA)

Cinema (UK) - Movie Theater (USA)

Handbag (UK) - Purse (USA)

Purse (UK) - Wallet/Pocketbook (USA) - I think that's right.

Tank Top (UK) - Sweater Vest (USA)

Car Park (UK) - Parking Lot (USA)

Garden (UK) - Yard (USA)

Moterway (UK) - Freeway (USA)



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Old Aug 7th, 2009, 11:43 AM   56
mellllly
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Think these have mostly been covered! Cant think of any more!??



 
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Old Aug 7th, 2009, 13:24 PM   57
tasha41
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Quote:
Originally Posted by whiby View Post
I've often heard "herb" being pronounced "erb" - as in we would say "herbal tea" but on US tv programmes (that's another one - programmes and shows) they say "erbal tea". Sounds so odd. Do Americans spell it without the h or is it just that the h is silent? Oh another one - commercials and adverts.
The H is silent I think a lot of people in Canada say herb, but a lot say erb too..



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Old Aug 7th, 2009, 13:27 PM   58
tasha41
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Originally Posted by Jody R View Post

One thing that always confuses me is that in the UK we write a date with day month and year (so today is 07/08/09) and my USA friends write it as month day and year (so to them today is 08/07/09).
Again we get both over here in Canada, I think the MM DD YYYY comes from the way we say the date ie: August 7th 2009, makes it less confusing! But yep we get both.. it gets confusing if you have 2 numbers together that are 1-12 and they don't specify sometimes I think formal documents are DD MM YYYY... but don't quote me on it.. because I guess when you're writing out say wedding invitations (fairly formal) you would say "the seventh of August two thousand nine" etc



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Old Aug 7th, 2009, 13:30 PM   59
tasha41
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I noticed typically people from the UK say "injections",
most of North Americans would say "needles", "shots", or "vaccinations"...

I think here "injections"/"inject" tend to suggest illicit drug use!



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Old Aug 7th, 2009, 13:44 PM   60
channy3232
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Quote:
Originally Posted by whiby View Post
I've often heard "herb" being pronounced "erb" - as in we would say "herbal tea" but on US tv programmes (that's another one - programmes and shows) they say "erbal tea". Sounds so odd. Do Americans spell it without the h or is it just that the h is silent? Oh another one - commercials and adverts.
The h is silent.

Oh! Coupons and vouchers!



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