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Old Mar 13th, 2017, 17:46 PM   1
broodymrs
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2 weeks in and drying up?


Panicking a bit. Been breastfeeding my newborn for 2 weeks now. He's my second baby and I breastfed his brother until he was 4 months so I've done this before and feel like I should know better!

Over the past 24 hours noticed baby feeding more frequently and for longer. He's been a bit unsettled between feeds, especially at night, My boobs no longer feel engorged, in fact they're completely comfortable. I know supply doesn't regulate until 6 weeks so I'm panicking that I'm drying up and that his behaviour is him not being satisfied and trying to get me to produce more milk. I typically have an over supply, did with my son too so this is new to me. My boobs have still been leaking a bit between feeds, he's still having plenty of wet and dry nappies and I can hear him swallowing when he feeds.

Opinions welcome, tia



 
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Old Mar 15th, 2017, 02:40 AM   2
noon_child
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Maybe it's a growth spurt. If he's feeding really frequently your breasts won't have time to get engorged but it doesn't mean they aren't making milk (if it's coming out it must be going in!). If it lasts longer than about three days I'd seek further advice but it sounds like he's doing well so far. Maybe this time you just aren't burdened with as much oversupply?



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Old Mar 15th, 2017, 02:48 AM   3
broodymrs
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Thanks. I've got the breastfeeding support worker coming today and last night was better



 
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Old Mar 21st, 2017, 19:38 PM   4
mrshan
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My LO cluster fed at that age, and kept it up for probably two months. I found it helpful to go to a lactation support group. It was at the clinic, so you could weigh baby before and after a nursing session.



 
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Old Mar 21st, 2017, 20:25 PM   5
broodymrs
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Thanks. I don't think there is a group but I'm using the breastfeeding support worker loads and having regular weigh ins. He's actually piling on weight! So it looks like my body has just adjusted quicker to bfing second time around. Breastfeeding support worker also felt he was snacking throughout the day so wasn't going long between feeds then having short feeds so I've been making sure I only feed him when he's hungry, not just at every little whimper. As a result he does seem to be feeding better and i feel fuller between feeds



 
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Old Mar 23rd, 2017, 14:33 PM   6
noon_child
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Quote:
Originally Posted by broodymrs View Post
Breastfeeding support worker also felt he was snacking throughout the day so wasn't going long between feeds then having short feeds so I've been making sure I only feed him when he's hungry, not just at every little whimper. As a result he does seem to be feeding better and i feel fuller between feeds
If this is working for you then that is great! In fact it sounds like you were doing great all along what with him putting on weight and peeing and pooing.

However there is no reason to wait till you feel full to feed - as I said human breasts aren't designed to fill up (there is literally no storage area for it) as they produce milk as it is needed. Breast that are full (i.e all the space between the milk making cells and all the ducts are full of milk because there is nowhere else for it to go) are more prone to getting blocked ducts, produce lower fat milk and overall milk production slows down.

Has anyone given you a list of common hunger cues? It sounds like as he gets older you are getting used to his needs and rhythms, so you will likely spot when he's truly hungry but sometimes we do miss things so these lists can be really useful. For example I never knew clenched fists was hunger sign and then I wondered why my LO started crying 'out of nowhere', when in fact she'd been telling me all along hh:

There's no one way to make feeding work. Getting to know your baby and responding to him rather than following what anyone else says is the best recipe. So glad your baby is thriving!



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Old Mar 23rd, 2017, 22:50 PM   7
broodymrs
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I've actually now gone back to feeding more on demand. Just felt bad like I was starving him trying to stretch it out, but actually he does tend to go 3-4 hours between feeds. Annoying every 2 hours at night though! The cues I remember from my first are the 'hungry face', poking out tongue etc. Trying to eat hands, rooting. Didn't know about the clenched fists. A list could be useful. Tbh I think because I'm a second time Mum and not really having any issues with bfing I've been left to get on with it unless I've specifically asked for help



 
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Old Mar 24th, 2017, 07:19 AM   8
noon_child
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Originally Posted by broodymrs View Post
I've actually now gone back to feeding more on demand. Just felt bad like I was starving him trying to stretch it out, but actually he does tend to go 3-4 hours between feeds. Annoying every 2 hours at night though! The cues I remember from my first are the 'hungry face', poking out tongue etc. Trying to eat hands, rooting. Didn't know about the clenched fists. A list could be useful. Tbh I think because I'm a second time Mum and not really having any issues with bfing I've been left to get on with it unless I've specifically asked for help
Stretching it out is only going to work if you are misinterpreting things as hunger when they aren't (like boredom or overstimulation - although breastfeeding is actually a great cure for these things too), and if he doesn't want it he wont take it so there's no harm in offering, if you are happy to do so.

Other hunger cues on top of the ones you mentioned are:
Increased agitation
Frowning
Cycling arms
Shaking head from one side to the other

Not all babies do all these things though.



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