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Old Oct 24th, 2017, 07:42 AM   1
MrsC10
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Tips for C Section Recovery


I don't have a sectioned planned and am hoping for a natural birth as with my DD, but I just thought I should have a better idea of what to expect/do after a section if it ever comes to that.

With my DD, I was told that if they couldn't turn her (she was lying awkwardly) then I would be an emergency section. It wasn't until that point that I realised I didn't really know much about C Sections and panicked a little at the prospect.

I've done loads of research on what happens during the process, but there's nowhere other than forums like this to find out what is the best after-care.

For example,
How is best to stand up from a lying/sitting position?
Is bending over possible or do you need to be careful about how this is done?
Will I be able to pick up my newborn?
Walking - when can I get out and about for walks with my LO?
Are there any helpful tips out there that ladies can pass on?

Thanks ladies!



 
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Old Oct 25th, 2017, 04:49 AM   2
Witchrose
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Hi,

Standing up- a visiting midwife taught me the best way was to gently roll onto my side and get up from bed like that. Don't sit straight up. (they didn't bother telling me this when I was in the hospital)

You do have to be careful about bending and such.

Picking up your newborn will depend on your own situation. I couldn't the first couple of days. The nurses changed my son, and fed him while I slept. When I was awake, they brought the bottle to me, and put him into my arms for me. Once I was able to get up and walk around, I did everything myself. But I've read other women saying they were able to walk around the very same day. So again, it really all just depends. I'm sure if you have one, the nurses will help you as needed and depending on your chosen feeding method.

You can pretty much walk whenever you feel up to it. Regarding other types of exercises, the visiting midwife gave me a pamphlet with gentle post-pregnancy exercises that I did for awhile. Then at 6 weeks, I was cleared by my gynecologist to be able to do my normal workouts.

Tips would be to ask if you have ab separation (diastis recti). It's rather common after a c-section, and if you have it, you want to be careful what kind of exercises you do. For example, if you do crunches and you have diasts recti, it makes your stomach pop out even more. So you want to do special exercises specifically for diastis recti. Once it is healed, then you can safely move onto normal exercises.

A lot of doctors will not bother telling you that you have diastis recti as it's considered a cosmetic issue, not a health one. Mine didn't. I just happily started working out again when she gave me the okay. And then I wondered why my stomach started popping out more. That's when I started doing research. My stomach did go down again, but I like to warn other women about it so they don't have to go through all that.

If it turns out you have it, there's lots of articles listing exercises for it, and which to avoid until it's healed.

Other tip would be... really not to worry about it. Other than a small scar, I'd never know I'd ever had one. I never ever think about it at all unless someone asks me about it. For me, it just happens to be the way my son came out. Nothing more or less than that.

Hope that helps a bit.



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Old Oct 25th, 2017, 07:25 AM   3
MrsC10
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Thank you so much for your reply. Very helpful information. I'll make sure to ask about diastis recti if a C Section is the route I have to go down.

It seems that no one was given clear information or guidance about their section recovery until they asked for it. You would think that this would be something given as a matter of course....

Thanks again for the great feedback!



 
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Old Oct 25th, 2017, 10:05 AM   4
Witchrose
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You're very welcome! And I totally agree with you.



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Old Oct 25th, 2017, 19:22 PM   5
Palladium
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I totally agree with how to get up from lying down - roll on to your side then gently ease yourself upright.

Of course you can pick up your baby, but I was told not to lift anything heavier than my baby for the first 6 weeks afterwards. My toddler is going to hate this when I have my second C-section in January!

I had my C-section at 8:30pm and was up by mid-morning the next day, as soon as they'd taken my catheter out. It's best to get up and moving (very gently of course) as soon as you can, but it depends on how your particular surgery went, obviously if it was complicated it might take a bit longer for you to be up and about. You can go out for short walks as soon as you feel up to it really, just rest whenever you need to and keep them short until you know you can manage.

Definitely follow any physiotherapists advice on dealing with abdominal separation, I had about 5cm after I had DD, but it all came back together nicely with a few exercises and some SRC recovery shorts (these are very good although pricey so maybe wait and see if you really need them).

Bending over etc just take things gently and only do what you need to. Also be a bit careful reaching up to high shelves and things as this can hurt a bit and may affect how well your scar heals if you do it too much.

One tip is if your bed is a little high, get a step to help you get in and out without hurting your scar. I found I really needed this to make it comfortable to get into bed, especially when I was holding my baby for a night feeding. I still use the step now actually because my bed is quite high and it just makes it easier.

But generally most people recover pretty well, so try not to worry about it too much, if you need one they will take care of you and let you know what you need to do.

Good luck!



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Old Oct 26th, 2017, 03:11 AM   6
MrsC10
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Thanks Palladium. Again, very helpful advice xx



 
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Old Oct 31st, 2017, 03:31 AM   7
Teri7489
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I had a section with my second and I recovered really well - was discharaged the next day and went home to bath a 3 year old so it's not all bad.

Take regular medication - don't skip them just because you feel OK. it's major surgery so you need them.

Take fruit/fruit juice as often as you can and drink plenty water. Your first poo after is an experience (as with an birth) the medication they give you makes you constipated so the more water you drink the better.

Take larger sanitary towels and place one over your scar. It's padding and you can hold it when you stand. Best way to do it as as described. Keep it there until you no longer need it but change it often to avoid risk of infection.

Move as soon as you are able, it helps your muscles to relax and stops your scar becoming taught. The longer you stay lying down the harder it is to get moving. Obviously follow medical advice but if there is no reason not to get up and walk around slowly then try. Again, keep regular medication and you will be OK. It also aids digestion, helps your energy levels and stops you getting a sore back.

Take peppermint capsules/chews/wind relief. The gas used in the procedure travels up after and escapes through your shoulders and neck and can be quite uncomfortable. Sounds really odd but it can make you a little panicky as it's a horrid feeling in your neck. It ends soon but taking peppermint really helps get rid of it quicker.

as for picking up your baby you can do it no problem. initially you will be tired and it will take you a little while to turn around to get to him/him so can buzz the staff to help. Once you have your catheter and lines out then there's no need to do that. Baby can cry for a minute or two until you get there. Just take your time and hold them close on your chest and do things slowly for the first few days. Keep in mind, pain is your body's defence system against harm. If it hurts it's because your body is warning you of something. So just be gentle.

Hopefully you don't need need a section but if you do to those tips might help a little x



 
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Old Oct 31st, 2017, 04:23 AM   8
MrsC10
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Thank you!



 
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