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Old Feb 14th, 2017, 11:24 AM   11
LoraLoo
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Old. The house I have my eye on is a grade II Georgian house. Big square rooms, loads of character, 2 open fires and felt like a home even though it has been stood empty for sometime. It's literally my dream home and I'll probably cry if it sells before we can buy it.
Im not a fan of new builds- they tend to come with tiny gardens and many have little living rooms too. They're also all really overlooked around here and I prefer not to be.



 
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Old Feb 14th, 2017, 22:31 PM   12
jessmke
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Old for sure! Things just aren't built to last these days, builders just do things as cheap and fast as possible. When we were looking for a house we wanted something built in the 1970's-ish. The house we bought was built in 1976 and it is awesome. Obviously some things needed to be upgraded to be more energy efficient like the windows and furnaces, but as far as the structure of the house it is extremely solid and well built. We also have a huge beautiful wood burning fireplace that we use almost daily. If we couldn't find something the right age then we would have built a house ourselves, but that would have taken ages because my OH is very picky and would insist on doing everything himself and wouldn't trust any hired help so it would have taken years for a house to get built! My OH has been renovating our home for the last two years, so not only is it a really well built house, but it has now been renovated to suit our tastes.



 
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Old Feb 14th, 2017, 22:43 PM   13
misspriss
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LOL whe I say build a house, I mean my husband and FIL and occassionally my dad working weekends, no hired help.



 
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Old Feb 15th, 2017, 12:24 PM   14
jd83
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I like newer homes. Just preference for modern look, really. Having said that, I think the workmanship on newer homes is pretty lacking unless they have a lot of oversight in the building process. They just throw these new builds together as quickly as possible using the cheapest materials they can get away with. We learned a LOT about checking every little thing they do when we had our last home built. They skimped on so much stuff that we didn't notice until months later. It was completely our fault for having such rose tinted glasses at the walk through, rather than being as critical as we should have been. Now we know, and if we were ever to build again, we'd be there checking progress a LOT and going over everything they did in the home before signing off on it. Hopefully we'll be in our current home forever, though, and not have to move again, lol. It's about 10 yrs old, I think, and was incredibly well built. Dh's grandparents went all out on upgrades and noise insulation, etc.



 
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Old Feb 15th, 2017, 12:58 PM   15
krissie328
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I like oldish homes. We bought a late 1970s house and love it. We have a nice large lot and a lot of space. We couldn't have bought anything nearly this large on our budget had we got newer. With that said we are doing some updating so putting a bit of money here and there. But really, for the size and location we couldn't beat it.



 
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Old Feb 15th, 2017, 16:25 PM   16
lindseymw
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Older house for me. Ours was built in the 70s.

I wouldn't touch a New Build. I know far too many people who have bought a New Build & are still having issues with it over a year later & trying the get the problems sorted have been a nightmare.



 
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Old Feb 16th, 2017, 02:26 AM   17
Moominmummy1
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I prefer an older house.Our current home was built in 1960.
A friend has a new build and so much is wrong with it! Window handles have come off in her hand, carpets were really bad quality.The garden is also really tiny.



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Old Feb 16th, 2017, 02:31 AM   18
Pearls18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lindseymw View Post
Older house for me. Ours was built in the 70s.

I wouldn't touch a New Build. I know far too many people who have bought a New Build & are still having issues with it over a year later & trying the get the problems sorted have been a nightmare.
That really depends on the developer though, some of the national companies in particular have horrible reps, my mum bought from a local builder and her house was great with no issues. I suppose all houses have snagging periods in a sense and for those that were built years ago have been long rectified. We're buying a 10 year old house and I like that the snagging is all sorted and that the house would have inevitably gone into negative equity for being overpriced as new and bounced back again so I wouldn't really class it a new build any more. (Well apart from the fact it's too small in an over developed area haha!)



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Old Feb 16th, 2017, 12:18 PM   19
lindseymw
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pearls18 View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by lindseymw View Post
Older house for me. Ours was built in the 70s.

I wouldn't touch a New Build. I know far too many people who have bought a New Build & are still having issues with it over a year later & trying the get the problems sorted have been a nightmare.
That really depends on the developer though, some of the national companies in particular have horrible reps, my mum bought from a local builder and her house was great with no issues. I suppose all houses have snagging periods in a sense and for those that were built years ago have been long rectified. We're buying a 10 year old house and I like that the snagging is all sorted and that the house would have inevitably gone into negative equity for being overpriced as new and bounced back again so I wouldn't really class it a new build any more. (Well apart from the fact it's too small in an over developed area haha!)
Yeah when I say a New Build, I mean ones that are built by the National Companies (Bellway / Persimmon / Taylor Wimpey). I would consider a new build that had been built by a trusted local builder. I wouldn't mind having minor things that needed sorted out but my friends have had major issues like the boiler didn't work when they moved in (more than one friend!) & took nearly two weeks to sort out so no hot water / heating. There's been major leaks (as in water literally pouring down the inside)! They couldn't get in the freezer for weeks because some muppet hung the radiator in the way so you couldn't open the freezer door (this had been picked up and flagged prior to moving in, prior to them actually installing the kitchen even but it wasn't sorted until weeks after moving in!)



 
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Old Feb 16th, 2017, 12:30 PM   20
Pearls18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lindseymw View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pearls18 View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by lindseymw View Post
Older house for me. Ours was built in the 70s.

I wouldn't touch a New Build. I know far too many people who have bought a New Build & are still having issues with it over a year later & trying the get the problems sorted have been a nightmare.
That really depends on the developer though, some of the national companies in particular have horrible reps, my mum bought from a local builder and her house was great with no issues. I suppose all houses have snagging periods in a sense and for those that were built years ago have been long rectified. We're buying a 10 year old house and I like that the snagging is all sorted and that the house would have inevitably gone into negative equity for being overpriced as new and bounced back again so I wouldn't really class it a new build any more. (Well apart from the fact it's too small in an over developed area haha!)
Yeah when I say a New Build, I mean ones that are built by the National Companies (Bellway / Persimmon / Taylor Wimpey). I would consider a new build that had been built by a trusted local builder. I wouldn't mind having minor things that needed sorted out but my friends have had major issues like the boiler didn't work when they moved in (more than one friend!) & took nearly two weeks to sort out so no hot water / heating. There's been major leaks (as in water literally pouring down the inside)! They couldn't get in the freezer for weeks because some muppet hung the radiator in the way so you couldn't open the freezer door (this had been picked up and flagged prior to moving in, prior to them actually installing the kitchen even but it wasn't sorted until weeks after moving in!)
Yeah I've heard the after care can be appalling taking forever to get things fixed, lark fleet is a big developer round here with a very bad reputation. I'm not sure who built the house we are buying, not sure how I can find out. It's not a particularly big development.



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