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Old Apr 8th, 2017, 06:26 AM   1
belleanna
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getting a puppy and ttc


Ok so here is my situation. We have been trying for a baby now for coming upto 8 months. We are currently renting but moving into our new house in august. We have spoken about getting a dog once we move into our new home, but the problem is i want a cute little fluffy bundle that i can take everywhere with me, but my husband would like a greyhound,at first i said ok lets get a greyhound but i have been thinking about it and i think it will be too much for me to handle. I dont want to appear selfish, not sure how to ask him if we can get a little fluffy puppy?



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Old Apr 10th, 2017, 08:28 AM   2
Symphony7
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Well I own both a greyhound and a small dog (and a medium dog thrown in the mix). I will say not all greys are probably the best with kids very young kids. They are large, sometimes sensitive dogs. Mine I am not so worried about because he is super sweet with children. But some can be snappy or nervous. You just have to get the right one. The adoption group will hopefully help match the right personality type with you. I am worried sometimes about him knocking over my kid, but he already has lots of practice in self control from living with a 6lbs Yorkie.

But they are big, hard to get them in the car, take up a lot of space. So if that is a concern, it's a valid one. It's a reason the next dog will probably be another small dog to be a it more portable.

At the same time, small dogs have their own challenges. Depending on the breed, they can be snappish, hard to potty train, require lots of grooming. Just do your research before getting any dog, especially on the verge of having a baby. Remember, they are just as much of a commitment, make a very informed choice so the dog and your child can both live peacefully in the same house.



 
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Old Apr 10th, 2017, 09:54 AM   3
belleanna
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Hi yes that is my concern that they are big dogs, i was thinking of getting a miniature poodle i have heard that they are easy to train and good with kids



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Originally Posted by Symphony7 View Post
Well I own both a greyhound and a small dog (and a medium dog thrown in the mix). I will say not all greys are probably the best with kids very young kids. They are large, sometimes sensitive dogs. Mine I am not so worried about because he is super sweet with children. But some can be snappy or nervous. You just have to get the right one. The adoption group will hopefully help match the right personality type with you. I am worried sometimes about him knocking over my kid, but he already has lots of practice in self control from living with a 6lbs Yorkie.

But they are big, hard to get them in the car, take up a lot of space. So if that is a concern, it's a valid one. It's a reason the next dog will probably be another small dog to be a it more portable.

At the same time, small dogs have their own challenges. Depending on the breed, they can be snappish, hard to potty train, require lots of grooming. Just do your research before getting any dog, especially on the verge of having a baby. Remember, they are just as much of a commitment, make a very informed choice so the dog and your child can both live peacefully in the same house.



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Old Apr 16th, 2017, 17:12 PM   4
happycupcake
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I don't have any experience with a greyhound but I have met a few who have always been absolutely lovely friendly dogs.
We have a labradoodle, who started out as a cute little fluffy bundle you could wrap up in your cardigan and carry about (before she had her vaccinations, it's still important to get out with them off the ground), she is currently seven months and is amazing. She's highly intelligent, super affectionate and eager to please, easy to train, isn't hugely high maintenance and once she has her adult coat she won't malt. She is good with the children but bearing in mind she is still a puppy, despite her size, she's also a bundle of energy at the moment too and like many pups doesn't understand fully how boisterous she can be when overexcited but of course this will calm down with time and training. She has all the qualities we wanted from a dog. She is, however, HUGE. And she will have some growing to do yet. I suspect she will be the size of a horse lol!
Whilst cute, small dog may be what you want, if you look into the breeds many small breeds aren't renowned for being good with children. This is something you may want to look into more. Miniature poodles I don't know their nature with children, but definitely look into them as the poodle is another highly intelligent breed and has many excellent qualities but I don't know the miniature's reputation with children.
I think generally it's best to focus less on the size of the breed, unless you are moving into a bedsit, and more on the individual's qualities which mean the most to you as a growing family



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Old Apr 17th, 2017, 02:16 AM   5
pamg
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I have a greyhound we adopted when my daughter was 3. They adoption centre matched our greyhound to us & she's fitted in great with our family & my daughter loves her so much!
They are big & personally I would have loved a smaller dog that could sit on my knee etc but I didn't really want to get a puppy as I knew the potty training would be hard especially running round after my daughter too & also having time for the general training too.
Our greyhound can be lively & loves her walks but is also perfectly happy just to sleep all day somewhere comfy! She just fits in with everything really well everywhere we go!xx



 
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Old Apr 17th, 2017, 05:53 AM   6
happycupcake
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Adoption as suggested above is also an excellent suggestion because they do usually match dogs to families which is good and obviously there are always lovely dogs who would benefit from a lovely home! Unfortunately many people get bored with their dogs past the age of 2, so after they are grown and aren't cute little pups anymore
The toilet training thing is a bonus with an adopted, slightly older pup or dog, but they do sometimes require additional training but it's usually fairly easy depending on breed, and don't believe the saying 'you can't teach an old dog new tricks' because it isn't true



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Old Apr 18th, 2017, 16:38 PM   7
SophiasMummy
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I would wait until you have had the baby and they're a bit older to get a puppy.

Just from the view point especially if you want a small dog that dogs espcially small dogs tend to be better with children if they've been brought up with them, small breeds can also be very difficult to toilet train so I wouldn't want a crawling baby around that and wouldn't deal well with a rough toddler.

I went against my own advice and got a puppy when my daughter was 15 months old though my boy is a border collie x gsd so not a small dog. It was very hard work but I grew up with dogs and had a lot of experience with dogs so hoped I could handle it. Honestly the day after I got him i was crying and asking myself what I had done and continued to do so on and off probably for the first year but we got there eventually and they've been best friends since day one.



 
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Old Apr 18th, 2017, 20:26 PM   8
jessmke
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I have quite a lot of experience with dogs, I used to own a dog walking and pet care company, and I am now a vet tech (nurse). I have to say that in my experience, a small dog is generally much less tolerant and much more likely to bite a small child than a large dog. Understandably so, when you are tiny it is much easier to get hurt. Larger dogs are more solid and able to take a bit more physical contact before it hurts. There are obviously many exceptions to this, but I wouldn't dream of bringing a small breed puppy into a home with children that are not yet old enough to understand how to properly treat the puppy. We see little puppies at my emergency clinic on a very regular basis who have broken bones from being handled too roughly by children who are too young to know better. If you are set on getting a smaller dog, I would go with a sturdier type like a pug, french bulldog, or boston terrier. They are still small and portable, but much more muscled than other small breeds. Pomeranians are another small breed that tend to be quite docile/tolerant. I read from your other thread that you are thinking of getting a mini poodle or a chi, those would probably be my absolute last choices to bring into a home with a small child. They tend to be nervous/skittish dogs, and honestly when we have one that comes into the clinic we almost immediately muzzle it unless it is a dog that we know because they are notorious for being "land sharks" as we like to call them! Again, there are probably many people who own these breeds and would completely disagree with me, but that is just my experience.

Greyhounds are can be fairly low energy dogs compared to their size, and are known to be good apartment dogs because they can be quite lazy. However, they are still a large dog so portability might be an issue.

There are lots of breeds and muts that fall in-between the small dog and greyhound size scale that would probably be more appropriate to your situation. I would recommend going to a shelter or rescue and tell them what personality traits you are looking for in a dog rather than focusing so much on what a dog looks like or what size it is. It is far more important that your dog's personality fits in with your family than what it looks like. Also, a dog's general temperament is pretty set by the age of 2, so getting an older dog means you know know what you are getting as far as temperament. Yes you can raise and train your own puppy, but genetics still play a role in the development of a puppy's temperament, so you really can't guarantee what type of dog your puppy will grow up to be. I like dogs that are mellow and laid back and "take anywhere with anyone to do anything" type of dogs, so I've always adopted dogs over the age of 2. There was 1 exception, a dog I adopted when she was 9 months old. For many months she was a dog I could take anywhere and she loved all people and all dogs. We did obedience training 3 days a week and lots of socialization with other dogs and people. By about a year and a half old she started to get picky with what dogs she would get along with, and by 2 years old there were only a handful of dogs she would tolerate. Despite my best efforts she did not turn into the type of dog I was looking for, I still loved her and she lived with me until she passed away, but I had to be cautious of the types of places I took her. On a very random chance I ended up meeting the person who owned her mother, and her mother was also not friendly with other dogs. So in her case, genetics overruled all my efforts at training and socialization. An older dog might require obedience training, but their general temperament will be set so you will know if you are getting a dog that is friendly with other dogs, friendly with people/kids, etc. Also, if you adopt from a rescue that keeps its animals in foster homes instead of a shelter situation you can get more information about what types of house manners the dog has, and whether or not the dog is tolerant with children.

And if you really can't decide on a breed, you can't go wrong with a golden retriever! But I am biased.

Yikes, sorry for the novel!



 
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Old Apr 18th, 2017, 20:31 PM   9
margeandmom
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French Bulldogs are a great compromise! That's how we ended up with ours! I wanted small, but husband didn't want a fluffy kind of dog, so we got a small but sturdy dog. Frenchies are incredible with children too! Especially if you socialize them well.



 
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Old Apr 18th, 2017, 20:34 PM   10
margeandmom
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I meant to add that Frenchies are also super portable!! I've taken them on flights and car rides all over the country! They also go with me to coffee shops. Very popular everywhere we go



 
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