Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Feb 3rd, 2013, 17:02 PM   1
special_kala
Mum (Mom)
BnB Spammer Elite
 
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: West sussex, england
Posts: 23,009

undermining women in labour?


A different thread has highlighted the fact that precautionary IVs are common place in some countries. The idea of that seems very strange to me.

It seems to me like women are expected to need intervention and things are expected to go wrong so its best to be prepared but to me women need to feel empowered and to feel like they can do it.

I'm pretty passionate about natural delivery so it really just baffles me.



 
Status: Offline
 
Old Feb 3rd, 2013, 20:16 PM   2
NaturalMomma
Mum (Mom)
BnB Addict
 
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Posts: 2,612
Yes that is common in the US. Not very many hospitals have faith in women to give birth naturally or unmedicated. We have high rates, up to 90% in some hospitals, of epidural and pain medication use. We have high rates of induction and vacuum extraction. It's pathetic.



 
Status: Offline
 
Old Feb 3rd, 2013, 21:30 PM   3
Proserpina
Mum (Mom)
Chat Happy BnB Member
 
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: Illinois
Posts: 1,153
In mild defense of routine IVs, some care providers really are going to be concerned that you be ready for surgery if an emergency is needed. And having an IV put in will waste precious minutes.

I think that a hep-lock is a good compromise. You retain your freedom and mobility, care provider gets the security of knowing that an IV can quickly be hooked up in an emergency.

That said, completely agree that a big part of it is the lack of faith in a woman's ability to birth naturally.



 
Status: Offline
 
Old Feb 4th, 2013, 02:19 AM   4
Fortune Cooki
Mum (Mom)
Active BnB Member
 
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: East Bay, CA
Posts: 764
Yep, I mentioned to a group of ladies at a party that I didn't want an IV (unless necessary), and they all tried to convince me that having the IV in 'just in case' was safer. One of them was a young nurse and said: "I hardly think they will let you go without one, it is standard where I work." Well, come to find out, my birthing center is more pro-natural. = )



 
Status: Offline
 
Old Feb 4th, 2013, 03:00 AM   5
special_kala
Mum (Mom)
BnB Spammer Elite
 
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: West sussex, england
Posts: 23,009
Does just having it in not give doctors more chance to use "well the iv is already in so..." When pushing further intervention.

The idea you don't have a choice in it is ridiculous to me. How in a 1st world country can you have no choice whether something is being stuck in your arm.



 
Status: Offline
 
Old Feb 4th, 2013, 11:48 AM   6
fionar
Mum (Mom)
Active BnB Member
 
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Minneapolis, MN
Posts: 562
Quote:
Originally Posted by special_kala View Post
Does just having it in not give doctors more chance to use "well the iv is already in so..." When pushing further intervention.
Exactly this. If for any reason I end up at a hospital to labor instead of being at home as is currently the plan, I'm refusing a hep lock on admit. WHEN and IF I need an IV, they can do it then. It feels really disrespectful to me that they'd try to get you to allow one when your plan clearly states you want to labor naturally.



 
Status: Offline
 
Old Feb 4th, 2013, 12:28 PM   7
gryphongrl
Mum (Mom)
Active BnB Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 400
Quote:
Originally Posted by special_kala View Post
The idea you don't have a choice in it is ridiculous to me. How in a 1st world country can you have no choice whether something is being stuck in your arm.
They absolutely will let you decline it. It's not in their wording, though. The wording is, "We're going to put in an IV right now." Then you have to say, "no, you're not." But definitely the way they phrase it makes it sound like they're going to do it. Everything does. They hand you a hospital gown and say put it on. You can just say no. (I said no.) But, they don't phrase it like you can. Another one is, "you can't have anything to eat or drink." Or, "get on the bed." You just keep your own clothes on, sit on the floor, and take out a granola bar. Those are all issued as directives but they aren't requirements.



Status: Offline
 
Old Feb 5th, 2013, 08:34 AM   8
aliss
AutoSignup (SAAB)
BnB Spammer Elite
 
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Québec
Posts: 26,285
I'm curious how many women & babies actually die or suffer lifelong complications because it took 2 minutes to put in an IV??



 
Status: Offline
 
Old Feb 5th, 2013, 08:41 AM   9
pinklizzy
Mum (Mom)
BnB Addict
 
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Wales, UK
Posts: 4,431
I had one put in and as far as I remember I was told they would be doing it rather than them requesting that I allow it but by that time I was fully dilated and ready to push and couldn't be bothered to argue.
I would've have refused one any earlier than that though, they're so uncomfortable.



 
Status: Online
 
Old Feb 5th, 2013, 08:49 AM   10
LoraLoo
Pregnant (Expecting)
BnB Addict
 
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Cumbria
Posts: 8,447
One of the Mums at school had one put in as a precation as it was her 5th baby and you are at higher risk of hemorrage. I had one in anyway for antibiotics. I dont think its undermiming women in labour as such.



 
Status: Offline
 
Reply



Bookmarks

Tags
labour, undermining, women

featured articles


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search






SEO by vBSEO