Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Jan 13th, 2011, 11:25 AM   11
PeanutBean
Mum (Mom)
BnB Elite
 
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Greater Manchester
Posts: 18,230
^ The info I have been given by the MW says the routine swab they do has a high false negative rate. If you have had a positive though it says you'll be offered the proper culture test (the accurate one) at 35-37 weeks. I've not seen my MW yet to discuss all this through. Sunflowers can you tell me, is the late swab something I could do myself so I don't have to be interfered with yet again?



 
Status: Offline
 
Old Jan 13th, 2011, 13:44 PM   12
KandyKinz
Pregnant (Expecting)
BnB Addict
 
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Canada
Posts: 3,695
The stats I have are pretty similar.... IF you test positive at 35-37 weeks then the chances of baby becoming ill with GBS is about 1/1000 (which doesn't take into account whether risk factors or present or not), then if you elect to have antibiotics then the risk of baby becoming ill is 1/2000... So it's definitly significantly lower.... but not by much.... AND it results in ALOT of women and babies receiving the antibiotics unnecessarily.

And from what I have read I also definitly agree that there's a huge connection between Prematurity and GBS morbidities and mortalities and I too would be more then willing to undergo the antibiotics if such a risk factor was involved..... But as for electing to have antibiotics on the sole presence of GBS.... well I don't know about that....

I do plan to swab though just to know but I remain very much undecided on what I should do should I swab positive and that remains the only risk present. So I guess if it's positive I'll buy the antibiotics just in case and go from there hopefully I will have made a decision on how I'd like it to be managed by that point! I am fortunate though that in my area the physicians are willing to prescribe antibiotics to women who are planning homebirths so that the midwives can administer them here as there are many areas in my provinces where women aren't so lucky.... So place of birth is not an issue for me.... It's really just the overall big picture that really has me skeptical about this overwhelming over usage of antibiotics.

And I'm curious to know what exactly the lab testing of the swab entails if it's not a proper culture??? Here the swabs we do are always cultured and in cases where allergies are present sensitivities are ordered as well as GBS resistance to antibiotics like erythryomycin and clindomycin are growing more and more common.... I've yet to see any results come back sensitive to Penicillin yet.... though I'm sure that day will come and that will be a scary day!

Also, I wanted to comment that the swabs for GBS are vaginal swabs. So all that is needed is to insert the swab into the vagina about 2 inches and just swab around and then it's suppose to be swept across the perineum and the tip of it should be inserted into the anus. It doesn't require a speculum or anything fancy and it's something women are more then capable to do themselves and often they feel more comfortable doing it themselves. So here midwives tend to just let the women do it themselves unless of course the woman would rather the midwife do it which doesn't really occur..... Then there's the doctors who don't believe women are capable sticking a q-tip into their vagina.... So they do it.... I prefer midwives.... Can you tell??



 
Status: Offline
 
Old Jan 13th, 2011, 14:00 PM   13
PeanutBean
Mum (Mom)
BnB Elite
 
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Greater Manchester
Posts: 18,230
Thanks Kandy. In which case I will ask my MW to let me do the swab I think.

Your question about the non-culture test is a valid one! I'm not sure how bacteria strains can be identified without sufficient culture nor could the amount of one strain compared to others be calculated. I've wondered myself but haven't seen anything with an explanation. I will try and find out I think. Maybe it's just PCR for DNA and then run a database match against the GBS plasmid? Given the high rate of false negatives one would wonder what the point of doing it at all is, especially given it has to be stolen as it'a not one of our routine tests...



 
Status: Offline
 
Old Jan 13th, 2011, 14:24 PM   14
Kitten
Mum (Mom)
BnB Addict
 
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Crawley, England
Posts: 6,467
If it puts your mind at ease, my midwife told me I do the swab myself. I think they just literally give you the generic pack but because you've been positive before you get it for free. You do it all yourself just like if you ordered it online or whatever.

To answer your earlier question, they didn't mention any link between the womb infection, however, I have made a mental note to ask my midwife what the causes could have been and if I had one last time if that makes me susceptible to another as I'm completely clueless. I didn't find out about the GBS until 3 days after I was discharged from hospital with the infection, the results got sent to my midwife and she phoned me and then came round to explain how to monitor LO for septicemia etc. but she's so lovely and didn't scaremonger at all.

To be honest I think the womb infection was more to do with my placenta. I had contractions at 35 weeks but due to baby's position didn't progress past 1-2cm and ended up having a sweep at 41 weeks to induce labour. When LO was born he was only 6lb 14oz and covered in vernix, and my placenta literally fell out within minutes of him being born and I had quite a lot of blood loss. I'm pretty certain the infection was on the placenta site too which is why I want to run through things with the midwife about it. But who knows?

I think if any of the risk factors for GBS were met, like high temperature, premature birth etc. you'd be co-erced (and I'd go along with it tbh) into giving birth in hospital anyway, at which point you might as well take the antibiotics since they'd be sticking a canula and stuff in anyway. It's just weighing up the comfort of a homebirth over the GBS risk. Basically any GBS risk factors rule out the possibility of a homebirth, but it seems my midwife is happy to bend round the testing positive part.



 
Status: Offline
 
Old Jan 13th, 2011, 15:17 PM   15
PeanutBean
Mum (Mom)
BnB Elite
 
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Greater Manchester
Posts: 18,230
I think if I am honest with myself I am so damaged by my last experience it will really take a lot to get me into hospital this time. I've probably said this but I'm going to arrange with the MW to get the antibiotics at home. I've been told by the other MW that if there is a problem this is the sort of thing that the Supervisor of MWs is able to approve. It'll be that or no antibiotics at all so they will do it I'm sure. I only intend to take them if my waters have been gone more than 18 hours as they were with my son. I'm going to do anything I can to try and stop them going first. Sounds ridiculous but I was so massive and it was all water and I'd spent the night before coughing all night with a chest infection and Byron was clearly not ready to be born so I think it was all mechanical. If I can but rest...



 
Status: Offline
 
Old Jan 13th, 2011, 15:49 PM   16
KandyKinz
Pregnant (Expecting)
BnB Addict
 
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Canada
Posts: 3,695
Apparently women who are GBS positive are more likely to experience PROM and from personal experience I'd have to agree with that. Apparently they have theorized it's because the bacteria weakens the membranes I've tried to find some good stats that look into the incidences of PROM among GBS positive vs GBS negative mothers but I have had little success so far.

Anyways I just wanted to comment on some 'natural' things that have been thought to reduce GBS. If anyone else has heard of any other things I'd love to hear about them...

1. I know you don't seem to be a fan of oral probiotics but there has been some thought (and I believe they are only just now doing a study on it) that taking 1-2 capsules of acidophilus prenatally in the third trimester reduces the incidence of having GBS.....

2. There's also garlic..... Apparently inserting garlic for an hour or so every couple of days is also suppose to get rid of bad or excess bacteria in the vagina. But in order for it to be effective you have to cut slits in it so that the allicin is released.... Personally I'm not a big fan of it because I find that garlic BURNS down there but if you do wanna give it a try be sure to tie a string or something to the clove so you don't have to spend all day fishing it out.

I'm using acidophilus. I started a few days ago when I hit 30 weeks. I feel much more comfortable consuming probiotics for 10 weeks then taking antibiotics.....



 
Status: Offline
 
Old Jan 13th, 2011, 16:11 PM   17
PeanutBean
Mum (Mom)
BnB Elite
 
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Greater Manchester
Posts: 18,230
Ah Kandy, there's a difference between boosting what is a normal bacteria already present and trying to recolonise the gut which is basically what the actimel type probiotics are marketing and which has been shown to be futile. (There's a very interesting scientist who made a synthetic gut and explored the formation of faeces; natural flora, trying to change that flora etc, very interesting stuff!) I am already on daily live yoghurt in the hope of generally outcompeting with the healthier lactobacillus naturally present. I have been using a little topically (but not inserting it) which is quite soothing but pretty messy even when used sparingly. I don't really fancy doing a yoghurt tampon...

Once again I am wishing my uni hadn't ditched Athens so I could easily access online journals from home. Hardly ever in the office now to be able to access them.



 
Status: Offline
 
Old Jan 13th, 2011, 17:11 PM   18
KandyKinz
Pregnant (Expecting)
BnB Addict
 
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Canada
Posts: 3,695
Quote:
Originally Posted by PeanutBean View Post
Ah Kandy, there's a difference between boosting what is a normal bacteria already present and trying to recolonise the gut which is basically what the actimel type probiotics are marketing and which has been shown to be futile. (There's a very interesting scientist who made a synthetic gut and explored the formation of faeces; natural flora, trying to change that flora etc, very interesting stuff!) I am already on daily live yoghurt in the hope of generally outcompeting with the healthier lactobacillus naturally present. I have been using a little topically (but not inserting it) which is quite soothing but pretty messy even when used sparingly. I don't really fancy doing a yoghurt tampon...

Once again I am wishing my uni hadn't ditched Athens so I could easily access online journals from home. Hardly ever in the office now to be able to access them.
Ahhhh, I see. I've used yoghurt tampons myself to combat yeast infections and BV in the past with great success.



 
Status: Offline
 
Old Jan 13th, 2011, 17:58 PM   19
PeanutBean
Mum (Mom)
BnB Elite
 
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Greater Manchester
Posts: 18,230
Have you? What is it like? I'm just too afraid to try if I'm honest!

I've just been looking into articles on the prom link but nothing linking it in that direction yet. It's hard to filter out from all the increased risk stuff. I do think in my own birth that my initial interpretation of the circumstances adds up but I'm by no means dismissing the possibility of it being a contributory factor, though there's no way to know if I was even a carrier then. The articles I did find (mostly medical literature) were so one-sided it was unreal. I suppose there's no reason really for clinical researchers to consider why it might be prudent to NOT use an intervention.



 
Status: Offline
 
Old Jan 14th, 2011, 14:06 PM   20
Freya
Mum (Mom)
BnB Addict
 
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Derbyshire
Posts: 2,623
Kandy, your post about the link between PROM and GBS+ status is interesting. I had PROM and whilst the midwife said there isnothing to suggest it will happen again, she became very interested in getting my previous pregnancy notes to see if I had been swabbed for gbs. I assume she was thinking about the link and how it may predict my labour this time.

I am now wondering if I can refuse the swab later on? My thoughts being they have to assume a negative status at labour? Or will this antagonise the Nhs? I won't be not putting my baby at risk and as before will accept iv antibiotics should I experience PROM again.



 
Status: Offline
 
Reply



Bookmarks

Tags
group , strep

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search



SEO by vBSEO