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Old Jan 24th, 2017, 16:13 PM   11
SarahBear
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It amazes me how early the UK expects kids to read. Here in the US, reading instruction doesn't start until 5 and even then, that's early for what research indicates is best. It amazes me that the UK starts it at 4! That's crazy!



 
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Old Jan 24th, 2017, 16:19 PM   12
sequeena
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I'd never thought much of it as I've been completely fine starting that early but watching my little cousins learn that curriculum it worries how much they're expected to do. They have homework pretty much every night. Thomas is learning from a different curriculum so he's not expected to do anything near what they do. At home we barely do anything school related. He has no homework, and he won't even tell me what he does at school. I read to him and we do colouring and crafts but it's all focused on play and I much prefer it that way.



 
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Old Jan 24th, 2017, 17:53 PM   13
SarahBear
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Originally Posted by sequeena View Post
I'd never thought much of it as I've been completely fine starting that early but watching my little cousins learn that curriculum it worries how much they're expected to do. They have homework pretty much every night. Thomas is learning from a different curriculum so he's not expected to do anything near what they do. At home we barely do anything school related. He has no homework, and he won't even tell me what he does at school. I read to him and we do colouring and crafts but it's all focused on play and I much prefer it that way.
That's the way it should be for ALL kids, not just those with special needs. While there are some kids who can learn and pick it up fine, it's not developmentally appropriate to expect it at that age. I wish the school system could provide an individualized education for every student that focuses on what those students are developmentally ready to learn regardless of age. Yeah, I know it's idealistic, but that's a large part of why I plan to homeschool my kids. Right now, Violet is in preschool because that school is in line with my educational philosophy. She'll go there next school year as well and after that she'll be kindergarten age (In the US, Kindergarten is just the first year of regular public school). I think Violet would actually do OK in school, but we're going to at least skip kinder since it's become very developmentally inappropriate.



 
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Old Jan 25th, 2017, 08:28 AM   14
Natsku
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Maria was a late talker (no words at all until 19 months) but caught up fairly quickly from by about two and a half. She's nearly 6 now and can't read at all except to recognise her name but that's not surprising as she hasn't started school yet. I've been trying to teach her to read in English using 'The ordinary parents' guide to teaching reading' but haven't got beyond the first two lessons yet. She wants to read (desperately!) but isn't ready to learn yet I think.

I think UK children learn far too young but English is a more complex language so its going to take longer to learn it compared to Finnish for example (they start learning in the 1st grade and most are fluent readers and writers by the end of the first term)



 
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Old Jan 25th, 2017, 10:30 AM   15
SarahBear
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An older study was carried out by Carleton Washburn, the famed Evanston, Illinois, educator. He introduced children to formal instruction in reading at different grade levels from kindergarten to 2nd grade. The children who were introduced to reading at these three levels were then retested in junior high school. The assessors didn’t know the grade at which each child had learned to read. Washburn found little difference in reading achievement among the groups. The children who had been introduced to formal instruction in reading later than the others, however, were more motivated and spontaneous readers than those who had begun early. Similar findings were reported in the Plowden Report in England, which compared children from the informal schools of rural areas with children who attended the more formal schools of urban centers.
http://educationnext.org/much-too-early/



 
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Old Jan 25th, 2017, 10:39 AM   16
SarahBear
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Originally Posted by Natsku View Post
Maria was a late talker (no words at all until 19 months) but caught up fairly quickly from by about two and a half. She's nearly 6 now and can't read at all except to recognise her name but that's not surprising as she hasn't started school yet. I've been trying to teach her to read in English using 'The ordinary parents' guide to teaching reading' but haven't got beyond the first two lessons yet. She wants to read (desperately!) but isn't ready to learn yet I think.

I think UK children learn far too young but English is a more complex language so its going to take longer to learn it compared to Finnish for example (they start learning in the 1st grade and most are fluent readers and writers by the end of the first term)
I think it being more complex is an argument to start later. It requires higher cognitive skills than a simpler language. I remembered some country starting formal instruction around 7 and having better results. Was that Finland that starts formal instruction around 7? I encourage reading with Violet and she goes to preschool, but I never put too much pressure on her. I do tell her that I think she's ready to learn to read if she wants to and I've had her decode simple words with help. However, we're missing that last piece of her feeling ready. And that's OK! She's only 4. I plan to go on like this until she's actually ready to learn to read... Well actually, I think she is learning to read. Learning pre-literacy skills IS learning to read. It's just the early stages. But anyway, I will not be putting her in kindergarten, so we can continue with this until she's 6, nearly 7. At that point, we can either continue as we are, or she can go to school. I would like to homeschool, but I have a feeling that Violet will want to go to school and would probably do well there. If not, then we'll just home school and she'll learn at her own rate.

(On a completely separate note, but linked by the country of Finland, I'm getting a Finnish Spitz this year and I'm excited about it!)



 
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Old Jan 25th, 2017, 14:49 PM   17
lau86
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It's like with swimming, I started my son swimming at three and a year later he was still going up and down with his float. Now he is 5 he is making much better progress, I think more because he is older rather than his earlier experience. I might be wrong. They'll all catch up in the end, the older starters will get it quicker. It doesn't seem to be harming my son at the moment but he only gets one book twice a week. My friends daughter gets a new book each night and more homework on top. I wouldn't be happy to do all that



 
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Old Jan 25th, 2017, 16:32 PM   18
Zephram
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It really depends on the child, to be honest, how early or late is appropriate for them to start reading and writing. My son is 4 and quite precocious and he would absolutely drink up learning to read and write at school right now. In NZ school doesn't start until 5 so he doesn't have the opportunity yet. We learn casually at home but he's very motivated by his peers and he would do well in school already. They are proposing to allow 4 year olds to start school if appropriate here instead of waiting until 5 and I would absolutely send him at 4 (they are proposing to leave it up to the parent whether they start at 4 or 5. I hope it goes through). He can't start school until his 5th birthday at the end of October and I think it's a total waste as he is ready now.



 
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Old Jan 25th, 2017, 16:46 PM   19
SarahBear
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Originally Posted by Zephram View Post
It really depends on the child, to be honest, how early or late is appropriate for them to start reading and writing. My son is 4 and quite precocious and he would absolutely drink up learning to read and write at school right now. In NZ school doesn't start until 5 so he doesn't have the opportunity yet. We learn casually at home but he's very motivated by his peers and he would do well in school already. They are proposing to allow 4 year olds to start school if appropriate here instead of waiting until 5 and I would absolutely send him at 4 (they are proposing to leave it up to the parent whether they start at 4 or 5. I hope it goes through). He can't start school until his 5th birthday at the end of October and I think it's a total waste as he is ready now.
I'm all for letting kids learn when they're ready. My issue is with forcing them to start when they're not ready.



 
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Old Jan 26th, 2017, 03:32 AM   20
Natsku
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Originally Posted by SarahBear View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by Natsku View Post
Maria was a late talker (no words at all until 19 months) but caught up fairly quickly from by about two and a half. She's nearly 6 now and can't read at all except to recognise her name but that's not surprising as she hasn't started school yet. I've been trying to teach her to read in English using 'The ordinary parents' guide to teaching reading' but haven't got beyond the first two lessons yet. She wants to read (desperately!) but isn't ready to learn yet I think.

I think UK children learn far too young but English is a more complex language so its going to take longer to learn it compared to Finnish for example (they start learning in the 1st grade and most are fluent readers and writers by the end of the first term)
I think it being more complex is an argument to start later. It requires higher cognitive skills than a simpler language. I remembered some country starting formal instruction around 7 and having better results. Was that Finland that starts formal instruction around 7? I encourage reading with Violet and she goes to preschool, but I never put too much pressure on her. I do tell her that I think she's ready to learn to read if she wants to and I've had her decode simple words with help. However, we're missing that last piece of her feeling ready. And that's OK! She's only 4. I plan to go on like this until she's actually ready to learn to read... Well actually, I think she is learning to read. Learning pre-literacy skills IS learning to read. It's just the early stages. But anyway, I will not be putting her in kindergarten, so we can continue with this until she's 6, nearly 7. At that point, we can either continue as we are, or she can go to school. I would like to homeschool, but I have a feeling that Violet will want to go to school and would probably do well there. If not, then we'll just home school and she'll learn at her own rate.

(On a completely separate note, but linked by the country of Finland, I'm getting a Finnish Spitz this year and I'm excited about it!)
Good point, but that does mean that children will miss out on reading for longer, but if it makes them better and more willing readers then that's better.

Yeah they start teaching reading at 7 here (1st grade), there will be pre-literacy things in preschool the year before (Maria starts this autumn - she's very excited!)

I love Finnish Spitzs, they are freaking adorable!



 
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