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Old Apr 26th, 2017, 12:31 PM   11
Kate&Lucas
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I was 18 when I figured it out



 
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Old Apr 26th, 2017, 12:33 PM   12
SarahBear
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Originally Posted by Kate&Lucas View Post
I was 18 when I figured it out
My husband still doesn't tie his shoes well and he's 34. He did better when I showed him the double bunny ear method that I use, but he still doesn't do it well. Violet is a lot like him with her coordination and body awareness. I suspect we'll just avoid laces until she expresses interest.



 
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Old Apr 26th, 2017, 14:33 PM   13
loeylo
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Even if shoes come with laces, there are things you can do to replace the laces. I think it's really a matter of whether or not you and your kid want to bother with it. I was sitting in a meeting regarding a high school student who couldn't tie his shoes. The dad wanted the school to focus on helping him learn and everyone else thought it was unnecessary including the kid's mother. During the discussion, someone looked under the table and pointed out that less than half the adults at the table had shoes with laces. There are always alternatives if it's not something you find important.

I did a quick google search. Check these out:
https://www.thegrommet.com/elastic-l...HAQ#color=neon
To a certain extent I disagree. When I was at school I was on the latter end of normal when it came to fine motor skills and coordination. As an adult I was diagnosed with dyspraxia and dyscalculia. These didn't necessarily hold me back, but it did make it more difficult for me to do the same tasks as my peers hence I was on the latter end of the normal timescales in tasks which were influenced by these conditions, compared to being early for skills which were not. For me, repetition and practice definitely helped and I eventually mastered skills with practice. I think avoiding laces by the time you are in mid primary school (7 years or so) definitely would lead to being ostracised by peers. By that age, kids want to follow fashion trends, and lace up "alternatives" such as curly laces are simply not cool.



 
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Old Apr 27th, 2017, 13:56 PM   14
SarahBear
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Originally Posted by loeylo View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by SarahBear View Post
Even if shoes come with laces, there are things you can do to replace the laces. I think it's really a matter of whether or not you and your kid want to bother with it. I was sitting in a meeting regarding a high school student who couldn't tie his shoes. The dad wanted the school to focus on helping him learn and everyone else thought it was unnecessary including the kid's mother. During the discussion, someone looked under the table and pointed out that less than half the adults at the table had shoes with laces. There are always alternatives if it's not something you find important.

I did a quick google search. Check these out:
https://www.thegrommet.com/elastic-l...HAQ#color=neon
To a certain extent I disagree. When I was at school I was on the latter end of normal when it came to fine motor skills and coordination. As an adult I was diagnosed with dyspraxia and dyscalculia. These didn't necessarily hold me back, but it did make it more difficult for me to do the same tasks as my peers hence I was on the latter end of the normal timescales in tasks which were influenced by these conditions, compared to being early for skills which were not. For me, repetition and practice definitely helped and I eventually mastered skills with practice. I think avoiding laces by the time you are in mid primary school (7 years or so) definitely would lead to being ostracised by peers. By that age, kids want to follow fashion trends, and lace up "alternatives" such as curly laces are simply not cool.
Did you look at the link? It wasn't curly laces. There are "cool" alternatives to laces. Also, if a kid is motivated to learn, then that's different. But if the kid doesn't care about learning to tie shoes or keeping up with trends, I don't think it really matters.



 
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Old Apr 27th, 2017, 14:47 PM   15
MrsMurphy2Be
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I think learning to tie your shoe laces is pretty important. It's one of those things that you can just do... I can't imagine why you wouldn't want to know how to tie, even if you don't wear laced shoes. I'd be pretty embarrassed if I couldn't tie my laces, and would also be questioning my parents as to why the heck they didn't teach me!? I also definitely don't think those are 'cool' alternatives, they are pretty ridiculous imo.



 
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Old Apr 27th, 2017, 15:11 PM   16
loeylo
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Admittedly I didn't look at the link, I have now and as a high school teacher these would definitely not be considered "cool" where I work/live. I teach kids from 11-18 and almost all of them are very into fashion and trends, anything which makes a kid "different" can lead to problems, I definitely would be forcing my kid to learn to tie laces as it's just one of those things that we need to do. Even if a kid doesn't wear laced shoes they still need to know how to tie a bow, for example during arts and craft or project works. At primary school, telling the time and tying laces were big milestones.



 
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