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Old Feb 26th, 2016, 13:50 PM   1
kerrymom
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Thoughts on skipping saline lock/ Hep lock in labor?


During my first labor the nurse inserted a hep lock into my right arm, which stayed, unused, in my arm for the next 48 hours. I hated it! It was so uncomfortable, and made it really difficult to be in certain positions during labor.

During my second labor I barely made it to the hospital before laying down on the bed, still in my shirt and pushing out the baby out in a manner of minutes. During the whole "labor" while on the bed, and after the birth a nurse was working on getting a hep lock in me, even after the baby was born. I just had my right arm stretched out, and could not even use my hand to hold on to anything. I got them, to finally take it out, unused, after 24 hours.

Now, my question is, has anyone been successful in convincing their doctors to skip the damn thing? I know they are hesitant to do this in case of any unforeseen problems, but I really don't want it.

Anyone want to convince me to go ahead and let them do it?

Thanks



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Old Feb 28th, 2016, 15:33 PM   2
marmoset
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I haven't given birth yet but I am adament that I will not get the lock unless I test GBS positive or something and know I'll need IV antibiotics.

As for what to say, it is your right to decline any medical procedure. Try using the exact words 'I decline this procedure'. If they keep going after you say that, it's assault!

That's for in the moment, I'm not sure about ahead of time. I plan on just saying i don't want it, they can argue all they want but ultimately they can't put it in without my consent (again, that would be assault.)

Hope this helps a bit!



 
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Old Feb 28th, 2016, 17:02 PM   3
jessmke
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They cannot do anything to your without your consent. Where I am (Calgary, Canada) they only put a saline lock in if you are having an epidural or need IV antibiotics. They don't put one in "just in case" they need it.

I ended up with an epidural after 24 hours of labour so they put the saline lock in and wanted it to stay in for 12 hours but I hated it and convinced them to take it out a few hours after the baby was born because it was really uncomfortable.



 
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Old Feb 29th, 2016, 06:21 AM   4
Wannabe Mommy
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In the UK they don't put in an IV or anything unless it is actually needed.

I was induced with my LG via a pessary and at no point was I even asked about putting in an IV or any medical procedures barring regular blood pressure checks and occasional belly band to monitor baby's heartbeat.

I think just be clear and say that unless they can give an explanation you accept and agree with you won't have any medical procedures done to you.



 
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Old Feb 29th, 2016, 16:03 PM   5
laila 44
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My hospital in Canada puts an IV line into all women in labor. However it's only hooked up if you choose to get an epi. The thing is, it's done incase of an emergency situation where it's already in and they can get the right meds in on time etc. Often in an emergency the mother is frantic and it's very hard to get a line in or find a vein not to mention they save time it already being in. Not something I'd loose sleep fighting over to be honest. It really is for YOUR best interest. What u can do is ask them to remove it right after delivery



 
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Old Feb 29th, 2016, 17:33 PM   6
Misscalais
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3 births and never had any type of IV. Only jab i got was for the shot they give you to help the placenta out. Im in Australia though.



 
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Old Mar 1st, 2016, 03:12 AM   7
cupcake23
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In an emergency someones role would be getting IV access/ blood.. Someone else would be getting fluids/ meds ready etc In the UK it's not routine and not done for 'Just in case' I would never have one put in for that reason alone.



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Old Mar 1st, 2016, 07:23 AM   8
laila 44
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cupcake23 View Post
In an emergency someones role would be getting IV access/ blood.. Someone else would be getting fluids/ meds ready etc In the UK it's not routine and not done for 'Just in case' I would never have one put in for that reason alone.
It doesn't affect you in any way though? It's just a plug in your arm that's all. Non active nothing going in. It's merely used where I am as a precaution. For me I just don't see the point in refusing? It really isn't uncomfortable at all! If it is its bc it hasn't been put in right. After all, noting is more uncomfortable than labor itself lol. In UK it's a totally different story though. They don't use a lot of the practices we do so it makes sense that it wouldn't be routine to install a plug. I'll give you an ex: while I was in labor with my first they had to immediately administer an antibiotic as I started a sudden raging fever right before going in for emcs. Baby's hb was dropping and I was loosing consciousness. My veins are rolling veins as in it takes several tries by an experienced nurse to get an iv plug in. Thank goodness it was already there and I got the dose and intravenous and it began to take effect immediately. Had they had to waste time putting one in while being rushed into cesarian it just would have taken more time and more stress as baby's hb was decelerating.



 
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Old Mar 1st, 2016, 07:47 AM   9
cupcake23
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As part of my role I put them in, if it's not clinically indicated then it's not done, you may have been lucky that it wasn't uncomfortable but it's the first thing a mum asks me to remove once baby is out... Like you say the US do different things but I know in my experience it's taks merely seconds to put 1 or 2 IVs in someone in an emergency, even our drs don't insist on them. I've seen on tv saline locks and they do look different than the venflons we use here in the uk, plus we use the 2nd largest size so that maybe why UK women hate them.



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Old Mar 1st, 2016, 11:37 AM   10
kerrymom
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It doesn't affect you in any way though? It's just a plug in your arm that's all. Non active nothing going in. It's merely used where I am as a precaution. For me I just don't see the point in refusing? It really isn't uncomfortable at all! If it is its bc it hasn't been put in right. After all, noting is more uncomfortable than labor itself lol. In UK it's a totally different story though. They don't use a lot of the practices we do so it makes sense that it wouldn't be routine to install a plug. I'll give you an ex: while I was in labor with my first they had to immediately administer an antibiotic as I started a sudden raging fever right before going in for emcs. Baby's hb was dropping and I was loosing consciousness. My veins are rolling veins as in it takes several tries by an experienced nurse to get an iv plug in. Thank goodness it was already there and I got the dose and intravenous and it began to take effect immediately. Had they had to waste time putting one in while being rushed into cesarian it just would have taken more time and more stress as baby's hb was decelerating.[/QUOTE]

It is uncomfortable, as I stated in my original post. For both of my births I repeatedly asked for it to be removed. I do not have rolling veins, and I have already had two children with no complications. Also, they probably gave me pitocin without my consent in order to deliver the placenta. It's a common practice where I live, and the nurses just administer it without asking if you have the hep lock. I would prefer not to have pitocin, and want to be asked before being given any medicine.

I am glad it all worked out for you, it sounds frightening. However, I don't want to be treated like I am a walking disaster-waiting-to-happen. I am giving birth in a hospital as opposed to a birthing center in case of emergencies, but I don't see the need for extra precautions. If I need an IV there are plenty of nurses around to give me one. When my second daughter was born there must have been 6 nurses in the room! Surely one is qualified to start an IV!



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