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Old Aug 22nd, 2016, 03:01 AM   31
jtr2803
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In my area now they are doing outpatient induction! You go in for monitoring, if everything is fine they do the gel and then let you go home to see if things start.

Obviously more formal methods would mean having to stay in but at least you can be at home to start.

I'm 40+9 today, midwife tomorrow where she'll offer a sweep but I'll be declining. I've been losing plug over the past few days so hoping this is a sign. If I go past Saturday I'll opt for monitoring and see how that goes.



 
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Old Aug 22nd, 2016, 06:47 AM   32
tommyg
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Outpatient induction sounds like a great compromise. Which hospital is that?



 
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Old Aug 22nd, 2016, 10:30 AM   33
jtr2803
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I'm down south, under Maidstone and Tunbridge Wells nhs trust. I've read of it happening at other hospitals but it does seem rare now.

They must obviously see some benefit in doing it, everything I've read indicates that a relaxed mum is likely to progress better. It's also a crazy busy hospital so I'm sure it helps them with bed management too!



 
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Old Aug 22nd, 2016, 10:56 AM   34
Tasha
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The thing is a nurse is going to see all the bad outcomes and not all the good ones as they would have gone straight home not to neonatal.

Any way, you know my history and if I was low risk then absolutely I'd hang on. I had an induction with Kaysie at 39 weeks because of Honey being stillborn at 36+6. We ended up with a section because the induction made her distressed. It was one hour and I went from 0cm to 8cm in that time, it was too much for her and out her in danger. That intervention affected my life in so many ways.

I would want regular monitoring and then I'd be happy to listen to my body in that the placenta is watched and also if baby is happy.



 
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Old Aug 22nd, 2016, 17:12 PM   35
tommyg
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Tasha, I'm guessing that I am forgetting that their could be a risk to baby going over my date. Sorry about what happened to Honey, hugs xx. I was in the "won't happen to me camp".

I have yet to hear of anybody having a good induction story. I've heard long painful labours involving epidural's, forceps, emergency sections, and the opposite end of the scale baby almost being delivered in a bathroom, midwives opened the door and go mum onto a bed with the head already out - not even a curtain for privacy.

But I guess any delivery is a success as long as you both go home and make full recovery at the end of it.



 
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Old Aug 22nd, 2016, 17:28 PM   36
Tasha
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For me it was too long without water, which is why it isimportant to have regular scans post 41/42 weeks to check the waters and placenta.

My point actually was that despite my experiences that dates wouldn't push me to induction just based on that alone. Clinical factors are more important to me.

I had an awful induction with my first, second spontaneous, Honey was an induction (was great but sad and very quick ninety minutes first contraction to holding her), Kaysie I already wrote about, Riley Rae was spontaneous and then Orion was an induction at 36+3 and that was fantastic but only because I'm headstrong, they were trying to get me to have pain killers, an epidural etc purely because I was on the drip for induction and they told me no one copes with out pain killers, I refused them even when I had the most amount I could have, refused to stay on the bed etc, so if I listened to them I'm sure more intervention would have happened.

Obviously you both being healthy and going home at then end of it is the most important outcome, however that doesn't mean that other stuff isn't important too. I look back at certain experiences and they will beautiful, I don't regret a second and every woman should have that if at all possible. They wouldn't feel like it is a means to an end or they have no say. Research, talk to professionals, talk to like minded people, talk to the head of midwifery and anyone who is pro-normal birth and then make your decision knowing you're doing what you feel is right. Statistics are important but in these cases the individual circumstances and care should be the biggest factor.



 
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Old Aug 22nd, 2016, 19:31 PM   37
tommyg
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Thanks Tasha I really appreciate your experiences.
Did you cope ok being on drip without epidural?

I'm half convinced epidural is best avoided if possible. The thought of a needle in my spinal cord freaks me out. I was told the other day of somebody who was perched on the bed for an hour while they faffed trying to get epidural in.
Then take into account it meaning you can't walk or stand. It can't be natural to birth lying down.

In very early labour the last time with bearable when upright contractions I decided to try and get some sleep / rest. I just about went into orbit with the next contraction. Tried again and gave up. Concluded lying down wasn't meant to happen.

I think you are right research so I know the risks. Ensure that there is a real reason for being induced (not just national stats).



 
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Old Aug 23rd, 2016, 00:56 AM   38
smileyfaces
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I had a positive induction with my first. Second induction was a veryblong process but once established labour started it was actually another very positive experience. I never had an epidural with either of them!

The whole point of the thread wasn't to bash inductions or anything, as I said, I've had two and they were okay, I would just rather avoid it and let my body do its thing as long as baby is happy and placenta is functioning okay!



 
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Old Aug 23rd, 2016, 05:45 AM   39
Tasha
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I really did cope fine. I had only had the drip twice before, with Kaysie and with Morgan. Morgan they instantly put an epi in as they put up the drip. If I'd had known then what I do now I wouldn't have allowed that. Orion they did keep saying right from the beginning about an epi. This time it never happened and I was much more assertive. I was on beanbags, squatting, all sorts during mine. So if you need to go down that route then just know what you want.

I think that was really clear smiley, I just wanted to reassure those that have only read about bad inductions incase it is necessary for them. I hope you don't think I was saying to just do it, I 100% agree with you, baby, placenta and clinical signs are more important than gestational age.



 
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Old Aug 23rd, 2016, 06:16 AM   40
tommyg
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Smiley I didn't mean to knock induction we are just opposite sides of the same coin.

Simply I'm terrified of the idea of being induced. Days before going into labour the last time I was advised to be induced - I pushed the date back by a few days and was dreading it. Wrote my birth plan in the middle of the night & broke the pen I was so stressed at the idea.
A back massage chilled me out enough to start labour.

This time i have been told of induction at 40 weeks (DS was born at 40&6). Frankly I have 4 months to worry about it.

Please give me your positive stories.



 
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