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Old Jul 21st, 2017, 00:32 AM   1
WackyMumof2
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Birthing Positions


I really want to be able to squat on the bed this time round. I found pushing on my back hard and I want to use gravity to my advantage. But I also feel that being in a squat position will allow me a better chance to actually be able to witness my baby's birth. And it means afterwards I can just relax and not have to worry about where to move until later on. I just need to find out if my hospital has a Birthing Bar available. Anyone else birthed like this?? What did you ladies do and did you find it to work well? Want some different views on this. Really adamant I don't want to be on my back working against gravity.



 
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Old Jul 21st, 2017, 04:03 AM   2
MindUtopia
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You might see what options they have for letting you just generally move around the room. Many hospital beds I've seen do have a headboard like things that you can lean against, or they can just put the bed upright and you can lean against the back. A birth pool might be an option too if you want a water birth as you can lean against side. I've also seen a few that have like hoists that hang from the ceiling or a door that you can use to squat.

I had a home birth, so I just went wherever I wanted in whatever position I wanted. But I pushed while squatting and being supported by my husband (just in the middle of the room, not on the bed), and then when I got tired of that, they brought me a chair and I knelt on the floor and leaned over the chair and that's how she was born. (Much easier because I was on a carpeted floor with coverings underneath me, so easy on the knees). Then I just got up and moved about 4 feet to the bed. I never got in a bed once when I was actually in labour. It really was much nicer to be upright and moving around. I sat on a birth ball for most of it, then walked around a bit, and then started pushing.



 
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Old Jul 21st, 2017, 05:37 AM   3
MrsC10
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I'd like to birth this way too. It's the way I wanted to birth with my DD, but because I was induced and ended up with an epidural, I had to labour on my back. Not very comfortable. I'm interested to hear what ladies that birthed like this have to say.
I'm hoping I can walk around as well, rather than be stuck to the bed the whole time.



 
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Old Jul 21st, 2017, 06:50 AM   4
WackyMumof2
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Then I just got up and moved about 4 feet to the bed.
Because I want delayed cord clamping this is what worries me. If I want to move then the cord will need to be cut? That is something that I want to avoid because 1/3 of baby's total blood volume is still in the cord and placenta. I am pretty sure that after the birth I just want to lay back and cuddle my baby and just forget about the need to wash, deliver the placenta etc even if just for a bit. And I will most likely be a little wobbly on my feet. I don't want to share my baby with anyone (including hubby) in the first hour. Did any of this prohibit what you wanted or needed to do?

But I want to be able to walk until the contractions are too much that's for sure.



 
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Old Jul 21st, 2017, 09:44 AM   5
MindUtopia
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Originally Posted by MindUtopia View Post
Then I just got up and moved about 4 feet to the bed.
Because I want delayed cord clamping this is what worries me. If I want to move then the cord will need to be cut? That is something that I want to avoid because 1/3 of baby's total blood volume is still in the cord and placenta. I am pretty sure that after the birth I just want to lay back and cuddle my baby and just forget about the need to wash, deliver the placenta etc even if just for a bit. And I will most likely be a little wobbly on my feet. I don't want to share my baby with anyone (including hubby) in the first hour. Did any of this prohibit what you wanted or needed to do?

But I want to be able to walk until the contractions are too much that's for sure.
There's no reason you'd need to cut the cord to get up and move. My daughter's cord was left intact for over an hour. I got up and moved just fine. It may be a bit trickier if you have a very short cord, but then one of the midwives just needs to help you carry baby so that you can be more upright until you get to the bed and then pass him or her back to you. I think I did still hold on to my daughter, but my legs were really tired after the squatting (I squatted on and off for 4 hours, so quite a workout!). So I'm pretty sure one of the midwives helped to support me a bit until I got to the bed. That's what they're there for anyway. Or your partner could help as well. But yes, my daughter was skin to skin for the first hour. Then after that they cut the cord and I needed to get a couple stitches, so I passed her off to my husband who sat down next to us on the bed and had skin to skin.



 
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Old Jul 22nd, 2017, 01:19 AM   6
WackyMumof2
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Originally Posted by MindUtopia View Post
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Originally Posted by WackyMumof2 View Post
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Originally Posted by MindUtopia View Post
Then I just got up and moved about 4 feet to the bed.
Because I want delayed cord clamping this is what worries me. If I want to move then the cord will need to be cut? That is something that I want to avoid because 1/3 of baby's total blood volume is still in the cord and placenta. I am pretty sure that after the birth I just want to lay back and cuddle my baby and just forget about the need to wash, deliver the placenta etc even if just for a bit. And I will most likely be a little wobbly on my feet. I don't want to share my baby with anyone (including hubby) in the first hour. Did any of this prohibit what you wanted or needed to do?

But I want to be able to walk until the contractions are too much that's for sure.
There's no reason you'd need to cut the cord to get up and move. My daughter's cord was left intact for over an hour. I got up and moved just fine. It may be a bit trickier if you have a very short cord, but then one of the midwives just needs to help you carry baby so that you can be more upright until you get to the bed and then pass him or her back to you. I think I did still hold on to my daughter, but my legs were really tired after the squatting (I squatted on and off for 4 hours, so quite a workout!). So I'm pretty sure one of the midwives helped to support me a bit until I got to the bed. That's what they're there for anyway. Or your partner could help as well. But yes, my daughter was skin to skin for the first hour. Then after that they cut the cord and I needed to get a couple stitches, so I passed her off to my husband who sat down next to us on the bed and had skin to skin.
That makes me feel much better. Thank you.



 
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Old Jul 22nd, 2017, 14:12 PM   7
Mum2BKW
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Delayed cord clamping doesn't mean you need to wait hours - the cord stops pulsing within 5 or so of delivery. Unless you are planning a lotus birth I really wouldn't worry about delayed clamping affecting you much post delivery



 
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Old Jul 25th, 2017, 01:11 AM   8
WackyMumof2
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Delayed cord clamping doesn't mean you need to wait hours - the cord stops pulsing within 5 or so of delivery. Unless you are planning a lotus birth I really wouldn't worry about delayed clamping affecting you much post delivery
I'm not sure if I want the cord cut before or after the delivery of the placenta but I know I don't want a lotus birth. I do know I want to be left alone for a while before the cord is cut though. Caring for a baby is hard enough without dealing with a still attached placenta. And I think here in NZ it's almost unheard of so I think there would be a lot of grossed out people if we left it in place until it fell off on it's own.



 
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