Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Jun 30th, 2011, 16:19 PM   11
Lina
Other
Chat Happy BnB Member
 
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 1,538
The blog entitled "You should be grateful---after all, you've got a healthy baby."
has brought tears to my eyes. Every single word and emotion resonates with me.
I cannot thank you enough Chuck for starting this thread. I too had an emcs for reasons I believe were
'The woman has been here for 24 hours and we are really busy and in need of beds.'
It is an experience which I will likely never recover from.



Status: Offline
 
Old Jul 1st, 2011, 00:49 AM   12
Nikki_d72
Mum (Mom)
Chat Happy BnB Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Scottish, living in New Zealand
Posts: 1,213
Quote:
Originally Posted by chuck View Post
UTERINE RUPTURE (insert intense scary music here!)

UR is the reason cited to you by OB's as to why a VBAC is 'dangerous' and particularly the reason why you are not allowed a water birth/homebirth etc and why you need to labour in hospital the minute you feel a niggle and have a cannula and monitor strapped to you.

<facepalm>

Risk of UR for a VBA1C is around 0.5%, so a 1 in 200 chance of it happening or thereabouts.

This is a really small risk 1 in 200 sounds quite big given how many women have babies every day but look at it this way, there are always risks with a vaginal birth and plenty of those risks can have just as poor outcome if you are unlucky enough to suffer them and many of those risks have a higher chance of occurring than UR.

Risk of cord prolapse in a normal vaginal delivery is the same 0.5% (ranging up to 20% for a transverse baby and in between for various breech presentations). Now an overt cord prolapse is an emergency which can lead to fetal brain damage or death.

Scary stuff eh?

...and this can happen in ANY vaginal birth not just my dangerous VBAC? YES it can, yet why isn't every mother forced to have constant monitoring and a cannula 'just in case'?

Because UR is an additional risk on top of that yes I understand that but still with all risks it can be monitored and managed. One of the best indicators of UR is funnily enough the Mother feeling something is wrong and pain between contractions...how is the Mother supposed to be able to pay attention to her body properly if she is worried about the cannula in her arm or very uncomfortable because she cannot move how she wants because of the monitor? Not to mention on edge because she is being offered interventions she may not want in a cold hard clinical setting?

I digress...but yes UR is a an additional risk but a very small one, one that can be most effectively managed if the Mother is allowed to labour how she wants which will in turn increase the likelihood of a normal vaginal Birth which is better all around for everyone involved.

Read through some of the links above there is some good info about UR - just dont be scaremongered but awful unsupportive OB's.
Thanks for bringing this all together, Chuck! (there goes another couple of days to the net, then, hehe)

What the stats don't tell us either is that only a tiny percentage (of the already tiny percentage) of UR's are catastrophic full ruptures, most are only slight separations of scar, causing no major problems and repaired afterwards. The other thing is the stats also don't differentiate between those who had Pitocin or Syntocinon to induce or augment labour and the effects that had. They also don't tell you that as many UR's occur prior to labour as in labour (so doing away with any logic in limiting time spent in labour, as they do) and in women with no scarring nearly as commonly as those with (mainly thought to be caused by synthetic oxytocin administration, although never proven and never admitted as no comprehensive study into the full effects of these drugs has been undertaken, despite their wide usage). Brilliant, eh?



 
Status: Offline
 
Old Jul 1st, 2011, 01:31 AM   13
indigo_fairy
Pregnant (Expecting)
Active BnB Member
 
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: UK
Posts: 481
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nikki_d72 View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by chuck View Post
UTERINE RUPTURE (insert intense scary music here!)

UR is the reason cited to you by OB's as to why a VBAC is 'dangerous' and particularly the reason why you are not allowed a water birth/homebirth etc and why you need to labour in hospital the minute you feel a niggle and have a cannula and monitor strapped to you.

<facepalm>

Risk of UR for a VBA1C is around 0.5%, so a 1 in 200 chance of it happening or thereabouts.

This is a really small risk 1 in 200 sounds quite big given how many women have babies every day but look at it this way, there are always risks with a vaginal birth and plenty of those risks can have just as poor outcome if you are unlucky enough to suffer them and many of those risks have a higher chance of occurring than UR.

Risk of cord prolapse in a normal vaginal delivery is the same 0.5% (ranging up to 20% for a transverse baby and in between for various breech presentations). Now an overt cord prolapse is an emergency which can lead to fetal brain damage or death.

Scary stuff eh?

...and this can happen in ANY vaginal birth not just my dangerous VBAC? YES it can, yet why isn't every mother forced to have constant monitoring and a cannula 'just in case'?

Because UR is an additional risk on top of that yes I understand that but still with all risks it can be monitored and managed. One of the best indicators of UR is funnily enough the Mother feeling something is wrong and pain between contractions...how is the Mother supposed to be able to pay attention to her body properly if she is worried about the cannula in her arm or very uncomfortable because she cannot move how she wants because of the monitor? Not to mention on edge because she is being offered interventions she may not want in a cold hard clinical setting?

I digress...but yes UR is a an additional risk but a very small one, one that can be most effectively managed if the Mother is allowed to labour how she wants which will in turn increase the likelihood of a normal vaginal Birth which is better all around for everyone involved.

Read through some of the links above there is some good info about UR - just dont be scaremongered but awful unsupportive OB's.
Thanks for bringing this all together, Chuck! (there goes another couple of days to the net, then, hehe)

What the stats don't tell us either is that only a tiny percentage (of the already tiny percentage) of UR's are catastrophic full ruptures, most are only slight separations of scar, causing no major problems and repaired afterwards. The other thing is the stats also don't differentiate between those who had Pitocin or Syntocinon to induce or augment labour and the effects that had. They also don't tell you that as many UR's occur prior to labour as in labour (so doing away with any logic in limiting time spent in labour, as they do) and in women with no scarring nearly as commonly as those with (mainly thought to be caused by synthetic oxytocin administration, although never proven and never admitted as no comprehensive study into the full effects of these drugs has been undertaken, despite their wide usage). Brilliant, eh?
Exactly, they don't go into details do they! And if I'd remember all that lot when seeing my consultant I would have loved to hear his response... oh no hang on.. he wouldn't have had one - selective hearing would have kicked in no doubt.



 
Status: Offline
 
Old Jul 1st, 2011, 02:03 AM   14
chuck
Mum (Mom)
BnB Addict
 
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Kent
Posts: 7,700
The fact that UR can and does occur in unscarred uterus's (or is that uterii? LOL)

It's touted as such a scary fatal thing and I'm sure it can be catastrophic for some but there's no need for such fear when birth is a risky business anyway.

Like another poster has already mentioned we're more likely to end up in theatre because of time/bed constraints.

I'd rather avoid theatre all together and thankfully did this time but I'd rather be there for a good reason - a real need for surgery.



 
Status: Offline
 
Old Jul 1st, 2011, 07:22 AM   15
Samantha675
Trying to conceive (TTC)
BnB Addict
 
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Austin Texas
Posts: 8,122
I read this on my midwife's partnering MW's blog the other day.

It is an article written by an OB, which was meant to sound really supportive, but comes off condescending. It is the follow up reply which made me clap my hands while sitting at the computer. It is written by an OB who left the hospital setting TO ONLY ATTEND HOMEBIRTHS!!! He was so disgusted by the system in the US, he left it. AMAZING!!!!

http://www.motherbloommidwifery.com/...-response.html



Status: Offline
 
Old Jul 1st, 2011, 11:44 AM   16
chuck
Mum (Mom)
BnB Addict
 
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Kent
Posts: 7,700
I think all OB's should be made to attend homebirths and waterbirths and good ol fashioned normal births at least 1 week a month.



 
Status: Offline
 
Old Jul 1st, 2011, 13:51 PM   17
SmokyJoe78
Mum (Mom)
Active BnB Member
 
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: UK
Posts: 600
Thanks Chuck for starting this thread - brilliant



 
Status: Offline
 
Old Jul 1st, 2011, 15:29 PM   18
Samantha675
Trying to conceive (TTC)
BnB Addict
 
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Austin Texas
Posts: 8,122
Quote:
Originally Posted by chuck View Post
I think all OB's should be made to attend homebirths and waterburyhs and good ok fashioned normal births at least 1 week a month.
But how would they control the birth? What about being home in time fir dinner?



Status: Offline
 
Old Jul 7th, 2011, 08:32 AM   19
RyliesMummy
Mum (Mom)
Chat Happy BnB Member
 
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: North Yorkshire, UK
Posts: 1,953
Thanks for this, great info



 
Status: Offline
 
Old Jul 7th, 2011, 15:31 PM   20
chuck
Mum (Mom)
BnB Addict
 
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Kent
Posts: 7,700
Quote:
Originally Posted by Samantha675 View Post
But how would they control the birth? What about being home in time fir dinner?
LOL maybe they might need a gag and chains a strict no bloody messing it up policy!

IN all honestly though I'm sure there are amazing OB's out there and yes they will and do save lives but from what I read and speak with women and MW's about there sure seem to be plenty of OB's who have no idea why birth is important any more or how it can and mostly happens without following the textbook or policy.



 
Status: Offline
 
Reply



Bookmarks

Tags
info support , vbac

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search



SEO by vBSEO