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Old Aug 16th, 2016, 14:02 PM   21
SarahBear
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Originally Posted by EcoMama View Post
Thanks Sarah. Yes he is nearly 7, he's currently in school but I'm keen to pull him out as I know he would develop better at his own pace at home.
But when I look at out weekends it's mostly taken up by being outside, riding bikes and walking.
When we're inside I go in to hime maker mode and leave dc to play with toys. I can't seem to grasp doing an activity in the house 😕 I need to change my mindset.
Also... Do you think it is possible to exclusively homeschool outside of the home, such as in forests, lakes, beaches, town, park, NT sites etc or is there a certain element which needs to be done sitting down at the table?
Thanks x
You can homeschool anywhere!



 
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Old Aug 16th, 2016, 14:04 PM   22
SarahBear
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I personally am in the "life learning"/unschooling camp, where we don't really actively teach any bookwork. We do sit down with writing at the moment, but that's cos he wants to. If he didn't want to write and he didn't ask us to teach him, we would leave him to play freely. There are no rules, and yes you can just play outside for years and still learn a lot.
You can also squeeze in mini-lessons anywhere and any place that your child asks questions or work certain things that your child enjoys, into your routine. For a while now, Violet has enjoyed spelling and rhyming in bed before sleep. I've recently asked her if she wants to add and subtract. So we do that (with fingers as visuals) as well. Since it's sleep-time, we just do one of each and then it's off to sleep. But questions can be asked and answered anywhere - in the car, at the park, at dinner, hanging out around the house, while watching a movie, et cetera. Or even answering questions with "I don't know, let's look it up."



 
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Old Aug 17th, 2016, 04:06 AM   23
minties
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I was looking into homeschooling my son, but the application process is daunting (you have to apply for permission for 6-16 year olds as school is a legal requirement) and I'm not sure if I have the ability to make myself into a good treachery. I never did well at school myself, despite being told I had a lot of potential and smarts. I just slacked off.



 
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Old Aug 18th, 2016, 16:30 PM   24
jessmke
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I'm curious for those who won't be using workbooks as teaching aids, how do you teach math?



 
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Old Aug 18th, 2016, 21:42 PM   25
SarahBear
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Originally Posted by jessmke View Post
I'm curious for those who won't be using workbooks as teaching aids, how do you teach math?
Life experience, conversations, card games, board games, spending money, computer games, paper and pencil, fingers, manipulatives, following and altering recipes, the list goes on. I plan to get workbooks, but they'll just be resources around that my kids may choose to use or not.



 
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Old Aug 19th, 2016, 01:56 AM   26
LoraLoo
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Originally Posted by minties View Post
I was looking into homeschooling my son, but the application process is daunting (you have to apply for permission for 6-16 year olds as school is a legal requirement) and I'm not sure if I have the ability to make myself into a good treachery. I never did well at school myself, despite being told I had a lot of potential and smarts. I just slacked off.
Here, if they're slready at a school, you just write a note stating you are deregister ing them and home educating.

If they've not started school yet, you don't need to do anything.



 
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Old Aug 19th, 2016, 04:27 AM   27
flyingduster
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LoraLoo View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by minties View Post
I was looking into homeschooling my son, but the application process is daunting (you have to apply for permission for 6-16 year olds as school is a legal requirement) and I'm not sure if I have the ability to make myself into a good treachery. I never did well at school myself, despite being told I had a lot of potential and smarts. I just slacked off.
Here, if they're slready at a school, you just write a note stating you are deregister ing them and home educating.

If they've not started school yet, you don't need to do anything.
Here we have to do a fairly in depth essay style application to prove you'll teach your kid as well and as often as if they went to a registered school. That then gets reviewed and considered by the ministry of education, often wanting more information before they then grant you an exemption to home school.

Once you get your exemption they leave you to it though! So it's totally worth it.

Minties, where are you located in the world??




As for math, I agree with SarahBear! Life!!! My four year old already has some of the basics just by general conversation And life.



 
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Old Aug 19th, 2016, 09:10 AM   28
SarahBear
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The US has different laws in every state, but in Oregon you register with the local school district and do statewide testing at select grade levels.



 
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Old Aug 19th, 2016, 10:05 AM   29
misspriss
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In my state you have to file a "notice of intent to home educate", and take various standardized tests. They have changed them many times, I think it is just 3rd -9th right now, used to be every year, was 5th, 7th, and 10th for a while...



 
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Old Oct 7th, 2016, 19:57 PM   30
NDH
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I'm another unschooler. My eldest did spend one day a week during one term at a forest school last year which was lovely but we cant afford it.

I am planning to be naughty and be one of the many home educating families in Australia who is not registered... My state the registration requirements are way over the top and once registered you have to show how you fulfilled everything you laid out in your application plan, submit examples of your child's work etc in order to be able to re register for another 6-12 months. Totally incomparable with unschooling without a lot of work. I cant apply to register to home educate until 6 weeks before she turns six anyway so I still have a year to decide if I will do it all above board after all, but its easy to be unregistered if your kids have never been registered for school anywhere and since I can only see regulations getting more restrictive I think I would rather just stay out of the hoops and red tape as long as I can get away with it.



 
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