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Old Jun 1st, 2018, 12:03 PM   1
Missy08
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Anti-Kidd antibody??


Hello! I had blood work done at my first OB appointment (last Friday). I got a call today that I have an anti-kidd antibody. I understood this to mean my body is creating antibodies to my baby's red blood cells.
Has anyone else had this/heard of it?

Not sure how "bad" this is or what it can mean for the baby/myself....They are referring me to a high risk doctor, but just to meet for now (unless things do get worse).



 
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Old Jun 2nd, 2018, 15:26 PM   2
WhisperGirl
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Sounds like you may be rhesus negative and your baby is not? In that case your blood may recognise the baby as a foreign body and attack. I'm rhesus negative too. They will give you anti D (your baby has the D antigen in their blood whereas you dont) to fight this. Everything should be fine, don't be worrying. It's not as bad a thing now we have modern medicine and a vaccine fixes it.



 
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Old Jun 2nd, 2018, 15:31 PM   3
jessicaftl
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I'm A- and had rhogam my first and second pregnancy, didn't get it last time and won't this time around as my husband also happens to be A- and not necessary.



 
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Old Jun 2nd, 2018, 16:43 PM   4
VALiz
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I looked this up after you posted about it. It is a complication but sounds like they know how to treat it if things get worse. Possibly with an intra uterine transfusion to the baby. Thatís good at least that they know what to do and itís treatable. Stressful still though...

Thinking of you.



 
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Old Jun 3rd, 2018, 11:15 AM   5
bdb84
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I'm not sure why you are being considered high risk simply because you have a negative blood type. I, too, am RH-. The only thing that is different is that we are given a RhoGAM injection at around 28 weeks and then again after birth if the baby's blood type ends up being positive. All three of my kiddos have a positive blood type, so I've received the injection post delivery three times. No issues, no complications.

However, from your signature I notice you already have two children so you should be used to this. Am I thinking you have something more than a negative RH?



 
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Old Jun 3rd, 2018, 13:05 PM   6
Wriggley
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Yes I’m anti-E people assume it’s because your rhesus neg and the baby isn’t this is NOT the case. It’s basically the same thing in the sense that your body is building antibodies against the baby but it can’t be controlled with a vax like the anti-D for rhesus negative people.

Yeah there are a few complications and this and that could happen but as long as you follow what the doctors tell you and go to all the appointments have have all the blood work done they can monitor it

Your level is likely to slowly rise during pregnancy but as long as it doesn’t go over 32 they don’t really worry



 
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Old Jun 3rd, 2018, 13:06 PM   7
Wriggley
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To add I’ve just noticed you have two children already it’s possible one of your children is a different blood group to you and you got the antibodies from child birth



 
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Old Jun 3rd, 2018, 17:15 PM   8
Missy08
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Thanks Wriggley, I was assuming someone I got it after my second was born. How are you been monitored? Extra blood work and appointments?

My blood type is A+ so I don’t think it has to do with that.



 
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Old Jun 3rd, 2018, 17:17 PM   9
Missy08
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bdb84 View Post
I'm not sure why you are being considered high risk simply because you have a negative blood type. I, too, am RH-. The only thing that is different is that we are given a RhoGAM injection at around 28 weeks and then again after birth if the baby's blood type ends up being positive. All three of my kiddos have a positive blood type, so I've received the injection post delivery three times. No issues, no complications.

However, from your signature I notice you already have two children so you should be used to this. Am I thinking you have something more than a negative RH?
Yes, my blood type is A+. This is a different kind of antibody. To my understanding, it needs to be monitored but can cause anemia in the baby which could require an intra uterine transfusion. It seems like all that can be done is monitoring the levels.



 
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Old Jun 4th, 2018, 17:14 PM   10
Wriggley
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Missy08 View Post
Thanks Wriggley, I was assuming someone I got it after my second was born. How are you been monitored? Extra blood work and appointments?

My blood type is A+ so I donít think it has to do with that.
I have to be under a consultant and I have to have 4 weekly scans (after 20 weeks) as it can effect the babies growth

My last two pregnancies I had to take aspirin but I canít remember if that was because of the antibody or because I also had a low Papp-a



 
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