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Old Jun 17th, 2017, 15:25 PM   1281
lilmisscaviar
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Makes sense, babybump. If the baby shifts position to where all of the kicks/movements are going into the placenta then you're likely to feel less movement. I had a couple days this past week where I didn't feel baby move much but today he's been moving quite a bit. I also notice that he seems to move less during a growth spurt. The only reason I think it is a growth spurt is because when he starts moving a lot again, I'll get bad SPD and my belly feels really heavy.



 
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Old Jun 17th, 2017, 23:01 PM   1282
gingmg
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Did anyone else see that the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists changed some of its recommendations this month? Basically their new position is that as long as nothing is wrong, leave the woman alone. This may sound so simple but the truth is that has not been standard hospital practice at all. There is an unnecessary amount of inductions and interventions associated with hospital births and hopefully these new guidelines will help change that and lower the cesarean section rates in the US. The new guidelines recognize that laboring on your back confined to a bed and hooked up to a monitor may not be in the laboring woman's best interest or the best way to encourage labor to progress. It recommends using a hand held Doppler intermittently so that the woman can freely move around. It also states that low risk woman should not be placed on a timeline to delivery, even if they have an epidural, that letting labor progress naturally is now recommended. The new guidelines also now let laboring women drink and recommend that doctors think twice about whether IV fluids are necessary or not, instead of it being part of the common practice that everyone gets. It doesn't go so far to say that women should be allowed to eat during labor, but it does suggest that this be reevaluated in the near future. Basically, the new guidelines recommend for OBs to be more hands off (as long as nothing is wrong) and to start to take on more of the birthing philosophy of midwives. I would imagine it will take time for OBs to change how they are accustomed to doing things but hopefully the culture slowly will start to change. I totally understand that birth is unpredictable and so many things can happen BUT, I think what many people don't realize is that sometimes interventions bring on the need for more interventions which can bring on the need for more interventions etc. I'm not saying that interventions aren't ever necessary, just that some things shouldn't be as "routine " as they are. Has anyone watched the documentary "The business of being born?" I was so happy to see these new guidelines this month, they sound so simple, but I really think it's going to bring more women closer to the experience that they hoped for and hopefully lower the Csection rate.



 
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Old Jun 17th, 2017, 23:05 PM   1283
MrsKChicago
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I think it's great to see the new recommendation, but it's crazy to me that it's necessary. You'd think leaving well enough alone would be pretty obvious...



 
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Old Jun 17th, 2017, 23:43 PM   1284
gingmg
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Right on



 
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Old Jun 19th, 2017, 07:01 AM   1285
Savasanna
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I saw "The Business of Being Born" ages ago and I still think about/reference it. It was a powerful documentary. I will say that I've grown more comfortable with the idea of interventions than I was when I first watched it (at the time I wanted a completely hands off, home birth - whereas now I'm happy with the idea of birthing in a hospital with the intent of no interventions, but am open to the idea if that's where the experience takes me) but I think it had a LOT of great points and really brought to light some inherent conflicts with a for-profit medical system.

That's really great news about the changes to ACOG!



 
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Old Jun 19th, 2017, 17:36 PM   1286
gingmg
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I'm not opposed to interventions either, when necessary. It's some of the routine practices that are beneficial for the flow of the system not the laboring woman and her baby that I am happy to see change.



 
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Old Jun 19th, 2017, 20:46 PM   1287
lilmisscaviar
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I've always wanted to attempt a home birth, but then when the time comes, I don't know if I'd chicken out. As much as I want as few interventions as possible, the baby's health, as well as my own comes before all. All of my kids were born at a birth center with a midwife rather than a OB/GYN which was perfect because I feel more comfortable knowing that those interventions are there if I need them, yet I like to deliver as natural as possible. Thankfully my first three babies were born without the need for any pain relief.



 
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