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Old Sep 21st, 2010, 17:20 PM   1
sparkle1
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shoulder dysplasia


Hello
my Lo was 10lb 1 when he was born. Ive been to see my midwife today, I am 19 weeks pregnant & she has referred me to a consultant as I will need to have extra scans to monitor the size of baby. She mentioned shoulder dysplasia & I have just googled it & its scared me.
Im not sure if I will have another big baby?
Did any one here have more than one big baby or has anyone been affected by shoulder dysplasia?
Thanks



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Old Sep 21st, 2010, 21:41 PM   2
KandyKinz
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sparkle1 View Post
Hello
my Lo was 10lb 1 when he was born. Ive been to see my midwife today, I am 19 weeks pregnant & she has referred me to a consultant as I will need to have extra scans to monitor the size of baby. She mentioned shoulder dysplasia & I have just googled it & its scared me.
Im not sure if I will have another big baby?
Did any one here have more than one big baby or has anyone been affected by shoulder dysplasia?
Thanks
Hmmmmm I'm just a little confused by the terminology.... I think however you're referring to what here in canada we call shoulder dystocia.... It's when the baby's shoulder becomes impacted on the pelvic bone. It happens in about 5% of births. Despite the common perception that baby is still receiving blood from the cord.... most of the time by the time the head is crowing the blood supply to baby is not very adequate for a prolonged period of time as at that time the cord is being compressed between baby and the cervix.

Most of the time there tends to be a small delay between the birth of the head and the rest of the body... That's perfectly fine.... but when that delay exceeds 4 minutes oxygen deprivation can occur and after 5 minutes incidences of brain damage and cerebral palsy can occur.

Luckily, doctors and midwives are taught several maneuvers to dislodge the babies arm and because of that it's not common at all for a bad outcomes to occur despite a dystocia other then a couple dozen more grey hairs!!!! Occasionally though, they may have to break baby's clavicle to get them out.... this tends to be self limiting and heals well with no future problems... More rarely will a baby develop nerve damage to it's arm as a result of them trying to get the baby out... sometimes this will recover spontaneously.... sometimes it won't

Anyways, shoulder dystocia's are more common if you're experienced them in the past but the incidence of it repeating is still relatively low at 15%.... Meaning that there is a 85% that it will not be an issue at all.... There's also things that can be done to prevent shoulder dystocias.... In pregnancy, you can be vigilent in eating healthy to try to minimize baby from gaining any unnecessary weight and during the birth you can reduce the chances of shoulder dystocia by birthing in a hands and knees position as that position opens your pelvis the widest.



 
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Old Sep 21st, 2010, 21:47 PM   3
Sophist
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My son was 9 lbs 9 oz, I was worried my next baby would be as big or bigger, and so worried about shoulder dystocia. (Mom and MIL kept telling me your first is always the smallest and they just get bigger every time.) My daughter was born at 8 lbs 13.5 oz, so she was still big, but not as big.

We didn't have any problems with shoulder dystocia with either of them. I'm hoping this one will be just a little smaller, maybe 8 1/2 lbs or so....

KandyKinz--I guess that's the reminder that I need to keep eating healthy. Normally my diet has been pretty good, but today I had an ice cream sandwich and a cinnamon roll.



 
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Old Sep 21st, 2010, 21:54 PM   4
aliss
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Hehe, yes, shoulder dystocia. As you can see from my signature, my son had it. My son received multiple fractures (including the clavicle) because my labour was prolonged and the dystocia was quite severe.

Smaller babies (even 6lb'ers!) can get SD, but it is more common with larger babies (larger meaning wider - a big skinny baby with slim shoulders is not at the same risk as a short wide one)

Check the link in my signature for more info, including remedies.

I will admit, the google stuff is scary. And to be honest, mine was a very serious/dangerous one (although my miracle baby is ALIVE for which I am grateful). Most cases of shoulder dystocia can be dealt with safely when it happens (keep in mind that a fractured clavicle is not a bad outcome considering the alternative).

I will be wanting an elective C section next time though.

My mom had all 10lb babies and none of them had SD. It's quite random although there is increased risk if you've had it before.

And yes be fit and healthy!!! It's not just making sure the baby does not gain excess weight. I had a 3 day labour and if I had not been a weightlifter/athlete before and even during my pregnancy, I would not have had the strength to push those 4 hours and deliver him (I did vaginally btw). Even my doctor and the nurses were amazed at my endurance. It really did save my little man's life. I can't stress enough how important it is. It's not just about weight.



 
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