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Old Dec 27th, 2012, 11:50 AM   1
_Nat_
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Question on Birth Certificate


Hi I have just got a quick question me and my partner are ttc and was wondering if we weren't in a civil partnership would my partner still be able to go on birth certificate or is it just civil partnership couples that can. We are in a civil partnership but was just wondering.
Thanks



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Old Dec 27th, 2012, 12:03 PM   2
The2mums
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If you was not CP then no you have to adopt.

If you are CP (like me) then you both go down as parent 1 and parent 2. The donor has no rights at all.

Catherine



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Old Dec 28th, 2012, 02:20 AM   3
Rainbow82
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The only way for both to ne in the birth certificate if not in a civil partnership is if you are ttc through a fertility clinic, IUI, IVF etc and have both signed all the paperwork together.



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Old Dec 31st, 2012, 08:25 AM   4
whatwillbex
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Hiya, both my partner and I are on the birth certificate. We are not in a civil partnership. I just had to confirm that I wanted my partner to be named as the parent on the Certificate.



 
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Old Jan 1st, 2013, 11:10 AM   5
_Nat_
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Whatwillbe that's what I had read somewhere and wasn't sure are you from the UK?



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Old Jan 2nd, 2013, 02:22 AM   6
Indiapops
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Quote:
Originally Posted by whatwillbex View Post
Hiya, both my partner and I are on the birth certificate. We are not in a civil partnership. I just had to confirm that I wanted my partner to be named as the parent on the Certificate.
confirm how hun?? i've never heard that but would like to do it if possible.. i'm due today so would like to look into that soon lol x



 
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Old Jan 2nd, 2013, 04:55 AM   7
Katiejac
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I'd be really interested to know if this is possible too, we're not in a CP, it is booked for 2014 though and I would love for my partner to go on the birth certificate, I had thought this would not be an option.

Indiapops can't believe its your due date, its gone so fast. Hope the little fella doesnt keep you waiting too long!! xx



 
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Old Jan 2nd, 2013, 06:01 AM   8
The2mums
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I honestly read that if its home AI and you're not in CP then you cannot have your partner on the certificate. Sure I read it on stonewall



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Old Jan 2nd, 2013, 06:09 AM   9
The2mums
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http://www.stonewall.org.uk/document...th_cover_2.pdf

Page 16

Q: are you in a CP
A: No
Then

Your partner cannot be the automatic legal parent of the child. The non-birth mother will have to apply to adopt the child.


Q:are you in CP
A: yes
Q does none birth mother want to be second parent
A: yes

Then

Your partner is automatically the second parent of the child. When you register the birth make sure you indicate that you are in a civil partnership and both names will be added to the birth certificate.


Unless you did it in a registered clinic then think it's ok and yes partner is other parent



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Old Jan 2nd, 2013, 06:16 AM   10
The2mums
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Below are a number of scenarios to explain the legal parenthood of couples looking to conceive either through a fertility clinic or at home.

A couple in a civil partnership who conceive at a fertility clinic. If you and your partner are in a civil partnership when you conceive, and you conceived through a fertility clinic after 6 April 2009, you will automatically both be considered parents with parental responsibility from the moment you are inseminated or an embryo or gamete is transferred to the womb. Both of you will be listed on the birth certificate.

If you have used a donor supplied by the clinic, or have provided your own donor, he will not legally be a parent of your child.


A couple, not in a civil partnership, who conceive at a fertility clinic. If you and your partner are not in a civil partnership at the time you conceive, and you conceived through a fertility clinic in the UK after 6 April 2009, you will both be considered legal parents so long as both of you have completed and signed the relevant forms, as parents, at the clinic before you conceive.
In this case, you will be considered parents from the moment you are inseminated or an embryo or gamete is transferred to the womb. Both of you can be listed on the birth certificate, provided that you attend the birth registration together. If the non-birth mother is not named on the birth certificate, she will be a legal parent but will not have parental responsibility.
If you have used a donor supplied by the clinic, or have provided your own donor, he will not legally be a parent of your child.


A couple in a civil partnership who conceive at home (or anywhere in the world outside the UK) with a donor. If you and your partner are in a civil partnership and conceive at home using a donor, you and your partner will automatically be considered legal parents with parental responsibility, provided that you conceive by artificial insemination (i.e. not by sexual intercourse).You will both be considered parents from the moment you are inseminated. Both of you will be listed on the birth certificate.
The donor will not be a legal parent of your child.You must be in a civil partnership at the time of conception in order for this to be valid.


A couple, not in a civil partnership, who conceive at home (or at a clinic outside the UK) with a donor. If you conceive at home (or outside the UK) using a donor but are not in a civil partnership at the time of conception, the birth mother (the one who gives birth to the child) is considered a legal parent, but the non-birth mother is not, unless she later goes through an adoption process.
The donor will be considered the legal father and may be recorded on the bir th cer tificate if the bir th mother and donor attend the birth registration together. Naming the donor on the birth certificate will give him parental responsibility and may affect your ability to later apply for an adoption order to give the non-birth mother legal status.

The adoption process. The above rules do not apply to children conceived before 6 April 2009. If you have a child conceived before 6 April 2009, the birth mother (the partner who gives birth) is a legal parent, but the non-birth mother (her partner) has no automatic recognition as a parent, even if you are civil partners. It is, however, possible to go through a legal process to acquire parental status for the non-birth mother.
The non-birth mother will also need to go through this process in respect of children conceived after 6 April 2009 if you:
• Conceive through home insemination and you are not civil partners at the time you conceive
• Conceive outside the UK and you are not civil partners at the time you conceive
• Or conceive through sexual intercourse with a man
The process differs from social service to social service, and in Scotland the process may vary, but it generally follows this format.


Hope this helps



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