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Old May 3rd, 2017, 19:56 PM   51
smurff
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Hi jessicasmum glad your feeling better, i to have some mental health issues, i have horrible ocd and anxiety problems, just waiting to see doc to finally get some help.

I can totally relate to how you must have felt when assesment lady thought the same as you. I'd known in my head my daughter was autistic for a few years, nobody thought the same as me and kept saying she'll catch up but i knew i was right.
When i was pulled into the office of my daughter's special teacher at the child development clinic i asked her did she think autism, when she said yes i swear you could have knocked me down with a feather , i burst into tears and just crumbled, even now remembering that moment is still upsetting, i could'nt understand why i was so shocked as I'd known it all along but to have it said out loud by someone else just made it all real.
I agree with you, I've had lots of people telling me that they don't like labeling children at a young age but i don't see it as a label at all, i find it a big help giving what my daughter has a title. In certain circumstances i do have to explain about my daughter, I'm so tired of saying oh she has development delay, sensory issues, autistic features, speech delay . Now i can say this is my daughter and she has autism, it's alot better for my daughter as she can get alot more help.
I am very lucky in the fact that i have an amazing family who help and support my daughter and can totally understand her needs, they know if they can go to her to say hello or when to just stand back and let her come to them, the same with my husbands family aswell.
Has your husband not mentioned autism to his mum at all?,. It must be very hard not having family behind you because you do need that extra support. To be honest if it was me I'd explain about your previous fears of autism and that you have possibly had it confirmed by your assessment lady, if she didn't accept it then that's her problem.



 
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Old May 4th, 2017, 08:41 AM   52
happycupcake
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Jessica's mum, I'm sorry you have been having a hard time of it. I somewhat understand since I have MH problems too. It isn't always as easy as get out of bed, be motivated! Sometimes it doesn't happen. I understand this and it's rubbish when it's like this.

Have you settled into your new home yet? I hope so.

I'm pleased your daughter's appointment went ok, I guess it was a relief that someone understood and listened? It was for me.

We had to rearrange the appointment for him since he was suffering with his constipation and there wasn't any way I was dragging him there in pain.
My mum didn't attend any of my appointments, my husband came with me. She didn't attend or get involved with the children regarding this as well. She doesn't accept it. I don't know why. We haven't spoken since February, she won't acknowledge me.

To both of you, have you thought about trying acupuncture for any MH issues? I use it for anxiety and it is amazing, by far the most helpful treatment I have tried



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Old May 4th, 2017, 14:54 PM   53
smurff
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Hi happycupcake, I never thought about acupuncture for anxiety, I didn't know that could help, to be honest I'm willing to try anything. It's got to a point where I have had to give up driving because I am convinced everytime I pass someone on the pavement that I've run them over!, sometimes I can drive round the block 6/7 times until in my mind I know I didn't knock anyone over. it's so stupid I know but it's the horrible thoughts, I'm so over protective on my children, I can't look at numbers or water I wash my hands 20 times an hour, believe me the list goes on and on.

I can't understand why family members have trouble accepting things, children with autism are so special and it's amazing how they see the world. I find it so hard to understand how family members and just turn thier backs because they can't accept things. It's really sad because they have no idea about the special times they are missing



 
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Old May 11th, 2017, 05:19 AM   54
happycupcake
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Yes acupuncture can be an absolute godsend, I rate it highly. It can take a few sessions to help but some respond quicker than others - I felt a huge difference after my first session and didn't have to take meds from that day. It's expensive but it's worth it. Unless you are lucky and have a GP who practices it, or is willing to refer you instead of having to have private sessions.

I don't understand, some people are weird. Autism doesn't make you a weirdo or someone to be ashamed of, it simply means your brain does things differently and you see and communicate with the world differently. Different doesn't equal shame or anything like it, but some people don't see that. They see it as an effort, a disability which will be impossible, or something that makes you stupid or lesser in some way. Sod them, they can keep their ignorance



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Old May 11th, 2017, 14:32 PM   55
smurff
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Couldn't have said it better myself happycupcake, at the end of the day they are the ones missing out, they see the world in such a special way, sometimes I think its us at a disadvantage not autistic children.



 
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Old May 12th, 2017, 04:42 AM   56
happycupcake
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I love that our little girl is incredibly clever, her speech is incredibly delayed but she's a problem solver. So, she may sound as if she speaks some alien language, but she is intelligent. Her only issue is being able to talk clearly, which must be frustrating for her



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Old May 13th, 2017, 02:22 AM   57
smurff
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Ah your little girl sounds amazing, and your right it must be so frustrating for them to not be able to say what they need. I think my daughters speech is around an 18mth old stage (she's nearly 5) and although she can say lots of things it's mostly just thing means her dad can understand and the majority of the time she does talk in her own language but we're so good at picking out words that we can genuinely understand what she wants, only yesterday she was a bit upset and tired and kept asking for something and for the first time I couldn't understand what she wanted and it was so upsetting cause she was looking at me and trying very so hard to try to say her words.
She is a problem solver as well, if she is doing something or trying to fix something you cannot get her away from it till she's solved it. She loves jigsaws, she has a box which Contains 3 jigsaws and they are all mixed in together, she sorts out all the pieces first just by looking at them them compleat's them all in about 5 minutes



 
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Old May 13th, 2017, 05:45 AM   58
happycupcake
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Our daughters sound quite similar, I would put our daughter's speech at about 18 months too. She can say many words but struggles putting sentences together and telling us what she wants. I think we inadvertently make this harder because we intuitively know what she wants or what the issue is and can sort it, many a time. Sometimes we haven't a clue though and it is rubbish when this happens.
She's more for taking jigsaws apart lol she likes tidying them away



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Old May 22nd, 2017, 17:21 PM   59
happycupcake
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We had the appointment for our youngest daughter today with the paediatrician. They diagnosed her today with an ASD. This hasn't come as a surprise



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Old Yesterday, 10:10 AM   60
jessicasmum
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Sorry yet again not posting for ages, just how my moods can make it hard to be able to post sometimes, I'm not being rude if anyone sees me on here and I just don't post, just how I get at times.

My daughter had her first paediatrician appointment on Thursday and she said she also thinks it's autism and she will be assessed for it now and she normally says 6 months to find out but should be before that. She's being assigned to a specialist health visitor now. She said to apply like we were going to for the nursery within the school that we need to apply for in January next year for her to start in September 2018 but I asked and she said she might have to go to a special needs school.
Yet again I already knew she had autism but it's hitting me hard, having a lot of crying moments recently.
Hubby told his mum and she was actually ok about it but I'm not sure she knows much about ASD.

Happycupcake: Sorry I realised I didn't answer from one of your previous posts about hypnotherapy over my dog phobia, I've looked into it but never tried it, obviously not something they will give you on the nhs. I've had quite a lot of CBT but that wasn't really for me.
I've never heard of acupuncture for anxiety either, something to keep in mind. How often have you had it done?
How do you feel now it's been confirmed about your daughter having ASD? Myself I feel bad for being upset about it because she's still my little girl and I'll love her no matter what.

Smurff: Sorry you also suffer quite bad with anxiety etc Have you had much different therapys to help?

Do either of you recommend any good sensory toys/equipment thats really helped your children? My daughter at the moment spends most of the time upstairs with hubby while I'm with the baby downstairs, she feels calmer up there bouncing about on matteress and I'm thinking we can't live like this and wanted to see if reorganising downstairs and getting some sensory things that would make it more calmer for her to be downstairs also, we have a middle room downstairs that we could turn into a bit of a play/sensory room.



 
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