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Old Feb 24th, 2017, 15:27 PM   1
SarahBear
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Questions for those who have kids with speech issues


How early did you start to suspect a problem?

With my oldest, Violet had about 3 words at a year, had a spurt in vocabulary growth at 17 months, and by 20 months, was speaking in 1 to 3 word phrases. By 2, she was speaking in sentences and shortly after, fairly long sentences.

I know that although Violet didn't start talking early, language has always been a strength of hers. Her bother, however, not so much.

Leo didn't have any words at a year. At some point he picked up "this" which was his only word for a long time. He had all sorts of bizarre ways of pronouncing it too. I don't remember if he had 3 words prior to 17 months, but around that age, he seemed to be going through a similar developmental stage to what Violet went through at the same age. I thought that he was going to have a similar expansion of language and maybe start talking some more. Instead, he solidified his skills with the 3 words he already had, using them with more purpose and consistency. Language growth has been generally really slow with occasional language "bursts" that feel like things are going to get started, but then they don't go far and end up plateauing for a while. Being able to sign has really helped him fill in some of those gaps. This recent "spurt" has resulted in a reasonable amount of vocabulary growth, but his language is still lower than I'd expect. I looked at a list of 25 common words that all 2 year olds "should" have. Leo only uses 10 of them. Six of them are words that he used in the past or he's approximated a couple times but isn't fully integrated into his vocabulary. Eight are words I don't ever recall him saying. I know the list should be taken with a grain of salt, but it does seem he should be able to say some approximation of milk, car, nose, hot, bath, book, more, and all gone. Those seem pretty basic and relevant to him.

Back at that original developmental leap that seemed like it would result in vocabulary growth at 17 months, it really felt like he was limited by his verbal motor planning. I'm wondering if that has anything to do with what's going on. He also will say certain words a few times and then not say them again for a while. It seems like he's learned the words "yes" and "no" about three different times. I remember Violet learning words and then apparently forgetting them when focused on other words, but this feels different.

How early could you tell there was something more going on than simply late talking? Were you right about what the problem was?

P.S. No I'm not concerned about autism. His weakness is in verbal communication, not social or non-verbal communication. He also has excellent receptive communication.



 
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Old Feb 24th, 2017, 15:35 PM   2
ClairAye
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My son is almost 5, he didn't say his proper first word until 21 months. I wasn't worried at the time, didn't worry a huge amount until around 2.5 where he still wasn't saying a huge amount of words. He now is about as coherent as his 3 year old sister and struggles with a lot of sounds like th, f, s, sh etc. He was meant to be seeing speech therapy from 2.5 but they completely neglected his case and so he's not being helped properly. A psychologist and myself think his is likely caused by a mixture of a traumatic birth and sepsis at 4 weeks old, she's the only person who's really recognised that this may be the issue, but obviously that is very specific to him.



 
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Old Feb 24th, 2017, 17:24 PM   3
sequeena
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I knew Thomas was behind other children speech wise early on. He didn't make many sounds and had no words when he was checked by the health visitor at 17 months. At the time I didn't have many concerns but the health visitor was worried as he couldn't do many major milestones, rolling over, walking etc. She noted his lack of speech and when she did her referral speech was one of them. If speech had been his only problem I don't think anyone would have taken much notice until he was 3. Thomas said mum at 18 months and no other words until 2. It was only when he was almost 5 that he learned to say his name and construct simple sentences.

From that initial assessment things snowballed and we're still finding new issues. Today he was diagnosed with central sleep apnea.



 
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Old Feb 24th, 2017, 19:56 PM   4
Beth04
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We suspected a problem before a year old because our son did not babble much. He was evaluated at 18 months, and since then he has been seen by a speech pathologist. He is now three and a half, and he has many approximations of words but they are all whispered. He is just starting to use short sentences. So in our case, we were right about our suspicions about a speech delay. In our situation, he just didn't make a lot of sounds at all (and it's recently that this has increased). We also signed with our son (and still do but we have recently started using an AAC device) and I believe that this has contributed to his speech improving.

My son is similar to yours when it comes to speech being the only concern. He has excellent nonverbal communication, social skills, and receptive language.

We still don't know for sure what the exact issue is, but he has suspected apraxia of speech.



 
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Old Feb 24th, 2017, 20:14 PM   5
SarahBear
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And I know that if there's something apraxia-like it's mild, but it really feels related to it. We'll see what happens over time.



 
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Old Feb 24th, 2017, 20:54 PM   6
Beth04
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If it does turn out to be apraxia related, then the majority of the time it's very resolvable with speech therapy. I hope that you find some answers, but being aware of a possible issue and working with him on it is key and you are already doing this.



 
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Old Feb 24th, 2017, 21:43 PM   7
SarahBear
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So, play skills and speech are supposed to be related, but they're definitely NOT for Leo. His play skills aren't delayed at all. Today, he was putting some small dolls into a toy truck and labeling them as "mama" or "dada." He knows who mama and dada are, but he's been labeling men and women with those words since he doesn't have any other gendered words to label people. Anyway, I started using a doll to talk to the doll he had and he responded completely appropriately. I had the little doll say to the big dolls things like "are you my mama?" or "are you my daddy?" and he said "yeah!" Then I'd say "let's jump!" and I'd make my doll jump. He imitated or joined in. Then I'd say other things and he'd follow along and respond by making his doll do the same thing. Then at one point I said something like "let's go for a walk!" and he took his doll's hand and reached it to my doll's hand. At another time I had my doll go in the back of the truck and he put his in too. Also, when I said "can I have a hug?" He put his doll up to mine. He pretends all the time, but I haven't done much of this kind of play with him, but he totally gets it and acts out his part with his doll. I've read about play and language development paralleling each other and I've been learning how to administer a certain play based assessment for autism, so I find his skills really interesting.



 
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Old Feb 25th, 2017, 17:15 PM   8
george83
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My ds2 only started talking at 2 months before his third birthday. Up until then the only real words he said were mum, yes and no, he had sounds that he used as if they were real words but they most definitely weren't. He pretty much just started talking and never stopped - one day he had a new word and by the end of the following week he was using full sentences and now he genuinely doesn't stop.

Although I never had any other concerns about his development in other areas and I know the professionals know what they are dealing with I never had any guidance or support for helping my Lo talk. I had to push and eventually self refer for a hearing test. As much as I trusted what I was being told it was extremely difficult to sit back and not do anything for him especially as the months went by and he made no progress, hopefully your lo will pick things up just as quickly



 
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Old Feb 25th, 2017, 22:02 PM   9
SarahBear
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He really is picking things up much faster recently. However, his articulation is really off on a lot of words and certain words sound the exact same. For example, "hat" and "light' sound identical. They can't do anything until closer to three for speech, but they seemed to think he was behind in language as well. I guess we'll have more info in April when he has his evaluation.



 
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Old Feb 27th, 2017, 15:21 PM   10
counting
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My nearly 23 month old has almost no language. I got his hearing tested and he is partially deaf. We are waiting for a call back in 3 months to see if some fluid has cleared from behind his eardrums. In the meantime we have been signing. Since the discovery less than a week ago, he has been using 10-20 different words/signs a day.

He is also definately not autistic but can'/won't point at body parts, etc. Though he has some. Obvious language comprehension.



 
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