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Old Jan 25th, 2015, 13:21 PM   1
Nataliieexo
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Abnormal smear results


I had a smear Monday and got the results in the post Saturday that they are abnormal it said I had highl grade cells and will receive a app for a further look I'm now paranoid I might have cancer even though it said that it's unlikely I do but there's always a chance and a chance it could turn into cancer one day. I'm 24 and have a 7 month old I'm thinking the worse because that's what I do, has anyone got any experience x



 
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Old Jan 25th, 2015, 14:07 PM   2
Kitteh_Kat
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I had an abnormal result for my second one, back in my early 20s. My doctor wasn't concerned though, and didn't even have me re-tested. Had a pap smear the following year and it was normal, and every one I've had since then has been normal. Hope everything turns out okay



 
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Old Jan 27th, 2015, 15:29 PM   3
seoj
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Hope this helps ease your mind hun...

It's VERY common for most women to get abnormal results at one time or another. Our bodies typically resolve the issue on it's own. But, on the off chance you get a pap and the abnormal results show up- they always "play it safe". As they should. I too got abnormal pap when I was in my 20's- got a biopsy, and further tests- but just confirms that they were abnormal, not cancerous. They had me come back twice a year for 2yrs for additional paps- all were normal after that and no further issues since. I'm now 41. I have many friends who all went through similar at one time or another. It's never fun- and there is never a guarantee, but statistically, it's very normal and common. Worse case- they caught it early- and would do everything to take care of it. It's only when it's not caught for years- and does manifest into something worse that there is much worry hun. Best of luck you get your mind reassured soon!



 
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Old Jan 30th, 2015, 08:44 AM   4
jd83
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I do cancer diagnostics for a living, look at pap smears the majority of my day, so here's my explanation of what your pap results mean:

ASCUS - means you had some atypical cells on the pap, but not enough of them to determine what they actually mean. Further testing should be done to see if there is an actual lesion, or if they were just very reactive cells. usually they will order an HPV test to confirm if high risk HPV is present or absent. If positive, they will follow up accordingly with a colposcopy to view the cervix and see if any lesions are present.

LSIL - means you have a low-grade lesion. This is the first lesion in the progression towards cervical cancer. They don't always do anything with this diagnosis. Sometimes they will just watch the patient closely to see if it resolves itself, as many LSILs will resolve on their own. If you also test positive for high risk HPV, they would be more likely to do a biopsy to confirm its only LSIL, and make sure HSIL is not present. Will continue to monitor either way for it to resolve itself. Usually continued monitoring means coming in more often for paps, maybe 2x a year rather than once a year until they return to normal for several consecutive paps.

HSIL - this means a high grade lesion is present. There are 3 stages to high grade: moderate, severe, and carcinoma in situ (cancerous cells that are still contained within the cervix, not invasive). High risk HPV is nearly guaranteed to be the cause, as most HSILs are caused by high risk HPV (the leading cause of cervical cancer. HPV inserts itself into cervical cells, causing mutations that develop into lesions, and then later cancer). HSIL diagnosis requires follow up treatment, which at minimum will be a colposcopy to view cervix, and usually involves biopsy removal of the lesion. The good news is that HSILs are still fully contained on the cervix, so can be fully/completely removed and typically patient goes back to normal results following complete removal. This is usually done with a cone biopsy or a LEEP biopsy (cone means they remove a cone shaped section of the cervix to completely remove the lesion, LEEP means they use a loop excision tool to remove the lesion). Yes, I realize it can be a scary process to go through, but this is why cervical cancer screening is SOOO effective. Catching these precancerous lesions, and being able to completely remove them means they won't further develop into cancer later. They will be gone. Removed. Cervical cancer rates have decreased significantly in developed countries because of this.

Cervical cancer - malignant cells are present, and have broken through the basement membrane to become invasive. Typically treated with hysterectomy to remove cancerous cells. Again, if caught early, very treatable with hysterectomy if cancer still confined to that area. This diagnosis is extremely rare in this day and age, honestly, as most women are getting screened regularly, and pre-cancerous lesions are caught, followed, or treated/removed to prevent getting to this point.

I hope this helps you understand it a little better, and puts your mind more at ease. I know it always makes me feel better to know more about something, so I don't feel so in the dark about it. Please don't think the worst of this diagnosis; I'm sure your doctors will take great care of you and make sure to follow up however needed to ensure you return to normal paps.



 
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Old Feb 5th, 2015, 03:13 AM   5
Nataliieexo
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thank you for the reassuring posts, I have my appointment tomorrow I think I will be getting a biopsy, I think most of all I am worrying if I don't have cancer if that will reduce my fertility or put me
at risk of cervical incompetence, because I am not done having kids either obviously my health is more important but not being able to experience another baby would crush me, I had every intention of ttc in the summer aswell. I'm really nervous about the procedure tomorrow aswell.



 
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Old Feb 5th, 2015, 07:02 AM   6
jd83
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yes, that can happen, but they have a lot of medical advancements to help in cases where the cervix has been shortened from biopsy. One of my friends actually dealt with this a few years ago when she was pregnant with her twins, and then again with her next child. They put a cervical cerclage (stitch) in for most of the pregnancy to keep the cervix closed, and then removed it when she was full term. Her pregnancies were both healthy, and she has three healthy kids now. The main thing right now is just making sure they remove all the abnormal cells. Good luck tomorrow, I am sure they will take good care of you hun!



 
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Old Feb 6th, 2015, 15:57 PM   7
Nataliieexo
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ok so I had my app he said I had moderate pre cancer cells and talked about a biopsy I said I would rather avoid the loop procedure as long as possible he took a quick biopsy which did hurt then he said we will wait for the results to see if they are severe then the loop will need to be done if it's mild we can keep a eye on it and I could have another baby without the risk of premature birth, I was ok with this but my oh is not and he wants the cells gone now, basically he doesn't want anymore now having another child doesn't interest him he already has 3 so it's ok for him but I have one and I don't want him to be a only child, so much to take in and think of.... I am sort of leaning towards just getting the loop because I feel selfish on my oh and son if I don't and I get pregnant and it turns out I have cancer because I didnt get them removed right away, my head is mashed.



 
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Old Apr 5th, 2015, 17:34 PM   8
Hausfrau
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jd83 View Post
I do cancer diagnostics for a living, look at pap smears the majority of my day, so here's my explanation of what your pap results mean:

ASCUS - means you had some atypical cells on the pap, but not enough of them to determine what they actually mean. Further testing should be done to see if there is an actual lesion, or if they were just very reactive cells. usually they will order an HPV test to confirm if high risk HPV is present or absent. If positive, they will follow up accordingly with a colposcopy to view the cervix and see if any lesions are present.

LSIL - means you have a low-grade lesion. This is the first lesion in the progression towards cervical cancer. They don't always do anything with this diagnosis. Sometimes they will just watch the patient closely to see if it resolves itself, as many LSILs will resolve on their own. If you also test positive for high risk HPV, they would be more likely to do a biopsy to confirm its only LSIL, and make sure HSIL is not present. Will continue to monitor either way for it to resolve itself. Usually continued monitoring means coming in more often for paps, maybe 2x a year rather than once a year until they return to normal for several consecutive paps.

HSIL - this means a high grade lesion is present. There are 3 stages to high grade: moderate, severe, and carcinoma in situ (cancerous cells that are still contained within the cervix, not invasive). High risk HPV is nearly guaranteed to be the cause, as most HSILs are caused by high risk HPV (the leading cause of cervical cancer. HPV inserts itself into cervical cells, causing mutations that develop into lesions, and then later cancer). HSIL diagnosis requires follow up treatment, which at minimum will be a colposcopy to view cervix, and usually involves biopsy removal of the lesion. The good news is that HSILs are still fully contained on the cervix, so can be fully/completely removed and typically patient goes back to normal results following complete removal. This is usually done with a cone biopsy or a LEEP biopsy (cone means they remove a cone shaped section of the cervix to completely remove the lesion, LEEP means they use a loop excision tool to remove the lesion). Yes, I realize it can be a scary process to go through, but this is why cervical cancer screening is SOOO effective. Catching these precancerous lesions, and being able to completely remove them means they won't further develop into cancer later. They will be gone. Removed. Cervical cancer rates have decreased significantly in developed countries because of this.

Cervical cancer - malignant cells are present, and have broken through the basement membrane to become invasive. Typically treated with hysterectomy to remove cancerous cells. Again, if caught early, very treatable with hysterectomy if cancer still confined to that area. This diagnosis is extremely rare in this day and age, honestly, as most women are getting screened regularly, and pre-cancerous lesions are caught, followed, or treated/removed to prevent getting to this point.

I hope this helps you understand it a little better, and puts your mind more at ease. I know it always makes me feel better to know more about something, so I don't feel so in the dark about it. Please don't think the worst of this diagnosis; I'm sure your doctors will take great care of you and make sure to follow up however needed to ensure you return to normal paps.
I know this is an old post, but it's extremely helpful thanks!



 
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