Breastfeeding noob, any help?

Discussion in 'Breastfeeding' started by wasey, Apr 5, 2011.

  1. wasey

    wasey mummy to Summer-Rose <3

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    I'm REALLY looking into breastfeeding once LO's born. I was on formula when I was a bubba, mum tried breastfeeding me but I was going into a coma as I wasn't getting enough.

    I am though, an uber noob when it comes to this, I have no idea on basically anything. I'm really not a huge fan (and I don't mean to offend anyone, it's just my personal opinion), on breastfeeding in public, so I would need to make bottles up anyways but... can anyone help me? Basically just explain the basics, benefits of breastfeeding, does it hurt? Can you breastfeed and then stop if it's not the right thing for you?

    Thankyou girliess ^____^ xxxx
     
  2. Nervous_1

    Nervous_1 Well-Known Member

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    Hi wasey! I was raised on formula too so like you I was an uber noob!! :)

    Firstly, and I'm not going to sugar coat this, for most women it REALLY hurts til about 6 weeks in as it's a learning curve for both you and your LO. Most women tend to get really sore nipples til they learn how to latch the baby properly, which your midwife should help you with once LO is born. Once you get the hang of it though you should be relatively pain free.

    Occassionally though things like mastitis or thrush can make feeding a lot more painful, so if you are really struggling with pain when feeding I'd ask to see your doctor or health visitor.

    Now for the good stuff :haha:

    When you BF your baby gets the benefit of all the antibodies you've acquired over the years, which can stop baby from getting ill. It's also easier for the baby to digest so they get less upset tummies and it provides everything that they need nutritionally. They also get the benefit of loads of extra snuggles from mum :)

    BFing will also benefit you too, as it can help reduce the chances of you getting osteoporosis (sp?) and certain types of cancer. Oh, and it's a great way to bond with your baby! :)

    I was also wary of feeding in public. For the first 6 weeks or so I didn't really go out other than to nip to the shops really quickly. After that, I would make a small bottle or two of formula to take with me in case LO got hungry (didn't always need to use though). Stupidly I forgot to make one a couple of weeks ago when I went to Tesco and LO got VERY hungry so I went into their cafe and fed him. I hardly showed anything (LO like to pull my top over his head when he feeds anyway lol!) and although I was nervous about doing it I don't think anyone even looked my way. :)

    I'd say give breastfeeding a go - every day that you manage to breastfeed will help your baby enormously! If it isn't right for you don't beat yourself up over it - a happy mum = a happy baby at the end of the day.

    PM me if you want some more info! :flower:
     
  3. CeriB

    CeriB Well-Known Member

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    ^^WSS!!!! Good one!!!

    I will add that, whilst it did hurt at the beginning, we settled down about 3wks in and now feeds go (pretty much) to plan!! I too am not a fan of BF in public, but sooooo many places have baby changing rooms that also have a BF room (ie M&S, Debenhams, House of Fraiser, shopping centres) and I found this easier than sorting out bottles. Also, the car is my new best friend when we are out!! If I need to, I will BF in the car where I am comfy and Erin is not too distracted.

    I really did find bottles and expressing so stressful!! I could never find the time to express and when I had to get ready to go out, having to take all the gear is tiring! I don't know how FF mums do it all the time!

    Good luck with your PG and we shall see you again soon!
     
  4. Nervous_1

    Nervous_1 Well-Known Member

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    Thanks CeriB :) After writing that essay I thought I was bound to forget something! lol
     
  5. Biscuitbaby

    Biscuitbaby Mum of 2 boys TTC#3

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    Take it a day at a time :thumbup: and be proud of yourself for every day (and feed) you do! ...I am :blush:
    It isnt the easiest thing to do at the start BUT it does get so much easier!! I cant believe I've made it to 8 weeks! (9 on Thurs)

    Family are starting to pressure me to give formula but I keep thinking nooo wayyyy - Breastfeeding is so much more easier! It's free, you dont have to steralise bottles, worry do you have enough formula in, worry the formula is too hot/cold to feed.
    I switched from b/f to formula with my eldest son because I found it hard and ppl said they would help ...but at 3 in the morning it was ME that was up making the bottles - no one else!

    if you do decide - like I said earlier ...take it a day at a time :thumbup: It has it's up's and downs like formula feeding. TBH there's not a day that goes by that I think 'should I switch' but remind myself of the good things and benifits.
    Dont let anyone make you feel that you MUST breastfeed or you MUST give formula (which I get A LOT of) make sure you do whats right for you and your buba :thumbup::flower:

    ...and I guess it's easier to try breastfeeding first and switch if it dont work out than to give formula and think 'OoOoOOO I wish I gave it ago now'
     
  6. wasey

    wasey mummy to Summer-Rose <3

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    Aww thanks so much girls thats so helpful! :) The more I'm finding out the more I'm thinking of breastfeeding, I think the only reason my mum's so towards formula is because she found it really difficult to breastfeed. Unfortunately my nan is SO controlling and wants to be everybody's mother and tells me things like "YOU'LL GIVE IT UP IN A WEEK. YOU DONT WANT TO DO THAT. ITS DISGUSTING" and all that hahaha. She's crazy.

    But yeah, thanks x1million girls :D <333
     
  7. wasey

    wasey mummy to Summer-Rose <3

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    Aww thanks so much girls thats so helpful! :) The more I'm finding out the more I'm thinking of breastfeeding, I think the only reason my mum's so towards formula is because she found it really difficult to breastfeed. Unfortunately my nan is SO controlling and wants to be everybody's mother and tells me things like "YOU'LL GIVE IT UP IN A WEEK. YOU DONT WANT TO DO THAT. ITS DISGUSTING" and all that hahaha. She's crazy.

    But yeah, thanks x1million girls :D <333
     
  8. Nervous_1

    Nervous_1 Well-Known Member

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    You're very welcome hun. If you have any more questions you'd like to ask then feel free :flower:

    And remember that if you need support once LO arrives that this place is fab! I'd probably have given up long ago without the lovely ladies on here :)
     
  9. Biscuitbaby

    Biscuitbaby Mum of 2 boys TTC#3

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    I'm the same as nervous_1 - I would have given up ages ago if it wasnt for the girls on here!! :winkwink: so keep coming back!
    My MIL hates it to - which also made me carry on :haha:
     
  10. MelanieAnn

    MelanieAnn Guest

    There's a lot to work through here. If your mum tried to BF you, but didn't get the help she needed to make it successful, that's a huge legacy. It sounds like she really, really persevered, and tried so incredibly hard. But if the latch wasn't right and you weren't getting good milk transfer, and thus, ended up in a coma.... that is a huge huge legacy that your mum probably has, and a lot of issues associated with guilt and shame and anger and distrust of those involved with lactation.

    I guess you know, and your mum was probably told, that it's really important to avoid bottles during the establishment of breastfeeding. That's true, really important information. But in this case, it was the avoiding of bottles that led to your coma. So there must be a huge, huge issue here: your mum believed this information (which is accurate) so much that she worries that she harmed you.

    When breastfeeding doesn't work out, it can be awful for mum and baby. It is even worse often when the mum persevered, and really tried, and risked harming her baby through trying. When the mum asks every "expert" she can find. When the mum really, really, goes through the entire canon of helpers.

    There is a very difficult balance here. Breastfeeding WILL work, and be successful, and enriching and wonderful and life-enhancing and fantastic, for 99% of women if they are given enough skilled support at the right time. But many women don't get that support, and often the people "supporting" breastfeeding are in fact fairly poorly skilled/informed.

    Saying "just keep putting baby to breast" is often the right thing to say. Part of the skill is knowing when to stop saying that, and use supplements such as formula. It takes training and discernment to know when is the right moment to change tune. It takes humility to say "I don't know, this is beyond my current knowledge and expertise of breastfeeding, I can find you an IBCLC who will be able to help more than I can". Promoting the virgin gut and the importance of avoiding bottles is incredibly vital: but there are also big-picture factors which must never be ignored.

    I imagine that your mum has a big legacy here. She tried. So very, very hard. She may distrust the breastfeeding promotion and helpers after her appalling experience. She may believe that bottles are vital. She may be angry and upset and very stressed on your behalf. She may hassle you constantly about your not producing enough milk. She may undermine your attempts to breastfeed, not because she doesn't love you and your baby, but because she loves you so very much and she doesn't want you to repeat her mistakes.

    The mistake, however, was not hers. And it was not the information about avoiding bottles, because that is true too. The mistake was that she was not supported enough, not helped enough, and really really badly let down by the midwives when she delived you.

    https://www.analyticalarmadillo.co.uk/2010/09/is-my-breastfed-baby-getting-enough.html will probably help and reassure you and your mum. It's well worth printing out and keeping with you during the early weeks!
     
  11. Cerellia

    Cerellia Well-Known Member

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    Hi,

    Do you have a midwife? You should really talk this through with her before the baby is born an she should help you with the first attempts because even if everything goes well, it is not easy to latch on the baby if you have no experience at all.
    If there are complications, you might need a lactation consultant. If you want to give birth in a hospital, the best thing is to choose a WHO certified breastfeeding-friendly one, as they have consultants there - if this is not an option, look up the number of a consultant before the birth and ring her if there are any problems.

    It is important to know that over 90% of women are physically able to breastfeed, the reason why so many women "can't" breastfeed is that they are poorly informed. :wacko:
    The baby is born with an instinct to suck (if this instinct is unincisive -> Lactation consultant) but it has to learn the right "technique". That's why it can be painful in the beginning. If you give your baby a pacifier or a baby bottle, it learns the wrong technique and breastfeeding becomes more painful or the baby rejects the breast altogether. This is especially critical in the first 1-2 month.
    Most doctors, nurses and even some midwifes are not really breast-feeding friendly or at least not well informed. Some are very quick in recomending aditional feeding of formula. This is not good as it destroys the balance of supply and demand (if your baby drinks formula instead of breastmilk, you will produce less) and can lead to a sucking irritation. Before you feed aditional formula, ask your lactation consultant if it is really neccesary. And don't feed it from a bottle, there are methods, that are less likely to produce a sucking irritation.
    The most important condition for a successful breastfeeding relation is bonding with your baby! Wear it in a wrap close to your body, let it sleep in your bed, let it lie on your naket breast, ect). It is also important to be relaxed and to eat and drink well.
    If your baby can drink whenever it wants, the supply of the milk will adapt to the demand. Don't listen to people who tell you, you should only feed every x hours. Attend the early signs of hunger (open mouth, baby "searches" your breast) and if possible feed it before it starts to cry.

    This page might also help you: https://www.llli.org/

    From a personal view: I found the first two weeks or so hart: After a painful birth, the last thing that I needed was more pain from breastfeeding and my baby wanted to drink all day long. On top of this, I had a galactostasia. But I weathered through all and it was soooo worth it. Breastfeeding is so beautiful for both, mother and child. So harmonious and one of the best methods of bonding. And: It is the easiest way to comfort the child or put it to sleep! I don't have to worry when my son is picky with his food because mommy milk contains all he needs. I don't have to carry anything with me when I go out. When I wear him in a wrap, he can even drink, while I'm walking!
     
  12. Rockell8788

    Rockell8788 Well-Known Member

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    I love breastfeeding I gave up with my first but this time I was determined to do it. Yes it is uncomfortable in the first week or so as your nipples get used to it and uterine contractions can happen whilst your feeding but they both pass quickly. Iv had a blocked duct which was painful but only lasted a few hours, got advise from here which solved it quickly. The best bits are having those special cuddles with you baby, knowing your givin them the best start so much easier than messing around with bottles and formula and it's free!!! You get such a special bond with lo as well. I love going out and not having to cart around a heavy bag full of bottles ect makes life easy. Im bot keen on bf in public but got over it quickly. There are also lots of bf groups around. Local sure start centres can point you in the right direction
     

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