Breastfeeding

Discussion in 'Pregnancy - Third Trimester' started by blutea, Feb 1, 2011.

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  1. blutea

    blutea Guest

    Hi Ladies! My name is blutea and I'm new to third trimester. :flower:

    I wanted to start a thread about breastfeeding because I'm sure a lot of us are thinking about it or have thought about it. I'm sure it has been talked about a lot already but I think it is important to discuss the topic ahead of time and to be prepared as much as possible. I would love to offer my support and advice as well as hear about your experiences, questions, concerns about breastfeeding in the future and any other ideas about that topic that you find important. (There is some great information in this thread that I posted a few weeks ago as well- https://www.babyandbump.com/pregnancy-second-trimester/509197-reasons-you-should-breastfeed.html)
    I apologize to those, ahead of time, who might find this topic offensive but, if you are willing, I would love to hear your input too, just please keep it supportive and polite.

    To introduce myself- I am a La Leche League leader and a BnB breastfeeding champion. I am pregnant and breastfeeding my son who is almost three years old, it looks like we will be tandem nursing in a few months. It will be quite an adventure to breastfeed a newborn and a toddler! I must admit that I am a bit nervous about the idea of tandem nursing but I have read and heard from other moms that it offers a wonderful bonding experience for the kids. My breastfeeding journey with my son had a rocky start (thrush, mastitis, sore and cracked nipples, bad latch, oversupply...) I was about ready to give up very early on but my stubbornness kept me going. I struggled with post partum depression for the first year and breastfeeding really helped me get through it. I had to overcome childhood sexual abuse and a cultural belief that breasts were only meant for men to play with. (Silly men, boobs are for babies! :haha:) I attended my first La Leche League meeting when my son was only a few weeks old and we have been going every month ever since because, for me, being around other like minded mothers was so very helpful. I have found deep emotional healing, from the childhood abuse that I had to endure, through breastfeeding and I am very passionate about helping others succeed.

    What are your thoughts?

    ETA: If you would like to find your local La Leche League meetings follow this link- https://www.llli.org/WebIndex.html All pregnant and breastfeeding mothers are welcome!
     
  2. whoops

    whoops Just me and my LO

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    Thanks for starting this - it would be nice to have a purely practical thread about breastfeeding, because there are some things I'd love to know about! :thumbup:

    Something I've been curious about in the days following the birth... I've heard you're supposed to feed your baby every 2-3 hours to help stimulate your supply, but I've also heard that newborns can be sleepy in the days following birth and can sleep up to 6-8 hours.

    Do you wake a newborn up to feed at the beginning? I plan on feeding on demand, but I am wary of not feeding enough initially - and from what I hear and have read, it's not possible to overfeed at the start.
     
  3. welshmummy2be

    welshmummy2be mummy of 2 (one angel) x

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    i plan on breastfeeding :)

    i am curious though...i heard that having type one diabetes can affect the qualty of your milk, how true is this?

    also i heard that giving your baby a dummy/ feeding both bottle and breast leads to confussion when suckling causing problems with milk flow, id like to use a dummy with my LO at some point, how long would you reccomend strictly breastfeeding (no bottle or dummy) for to esablish good milk flow?
     
  4. Lina

    Lina Hooyo

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    It has been scientifically proven that breastfeeding reduces post partum depression, amongst many other benefits. Therefore i definitely will be breastfeeding. There was some debate recently about exclusive breast feeding for 6 months, thus delaying introducing solids exposed children to anaemia, and food allergies. What are your views on this bluetea/ others? and when do you plan on introducing solids?

    Topics such as these are really beneficial and educative and I hope it wont be hijacked.
     
  5. blutea

    blutea Guest

    The usual rule of thump is 12 feeds in a 24 hours period. Sometimes a baby will nurse consistently every two hours but it's more likely they will sleep for several hours and then cluster feed (nurse very often--possibly every 20 minutes-- for a few hours.) As long as your baby is healthy, hydrated and growing it's just fine for him/her to sleep for a stretch (but no more than four hours) and feed on demand while he's awake.

    This article gives great information for breastfeeding a newborn- https://www.kellymom.com/bf/normal/newborn-nursing.html

    Nursing your newborn — what to expect in the early weeks
    This information is also found as part of the professional Breastfeeding Logs.

    By Kelly Bonyata, BS, IBCLC

    •The First Week
    •Weeks two through six
    •Additional information
    The First Week
    How often should baby be nursing?

    Frequent nursing encourages good milk supply and reduces engorgement. Aim for nursing at least 10 - 12 times per day (24 hours). You CAN'T nurse too often--you CAN nurse too little.

    Nurse at the first signs of hunger (stirring, rooting, hands in mouth)--don't wait until baby is crying. Allow baby unlimited time at the breast when sucking actively, then offer the second breast. Some newborns are excessively sleepy at first--wake baby to nurse if 2 hours (during the day) or 4 hours (at night) have passed without nursing.

    Is baby getting enough milk?

    Weight gain: Normal newborns may lose up to 7% of birth weight in the first few days. After mom's milk comes in, the average breastfed baby gains 6 oz/week (170 g/week). Take baby for a weight check at the end of the first week or beginning of the second week. Consult with baby's doctor and your lactation consultant if baby is not gaining as expected.

    Dirty diapers: In the early days, baby typically has one dirty diaper for each day of life (1 on day one, 2 on day two...). After day 4, stools should be yellow and baby should have at least 3-4 stools daily that are the size of a US quarter (2.5 cm) or larger. Some babies stool every time they nurse, or even more often--this is normal, too. The normal stool of a breastfed baby is loose (soft to runny) and may be seedy or curdy.

    Wet diapers: In the early days, baby typically has one wet diaper for each day of life (1 on day one, 2 on day two...). Once mom's milk comes in, expect 5-6+ wet diapers every 24 hours. To feel what a sufficiently wet diaper is like, pour 3 tablespoons (45 mL) of water into a clean diaper. A piece of tissue in a disposable diaper will help you determine if the diaper is wet.

    Breast changes

    Your milk should start to "come in" (increase in quantity and change from colostrum to mature milk) between days 2 and 5. To minimize engorgement: nurse often, don’t skip feedings (even at night), ensure good latch/positioning, and let baby finish the first breast before offering the other side. To decrease discomfort from engorgement, use cold and/or cabbage leaf compresses between feedings. If baby is having trouble latching due to engorgement, use reverse pressure softening or express milk until the nipple is soft, then try latching again.

    Call your doctor, midwife and/or lactation consultant if:

    •Baby is having no wet or dirty diapers
    •Baby has dark colored urine after day 3
    (should be pale yellow to clear)
    •Baby has dark colored stools after day 4
    (should be mustard yellow, with no meconium)
    •Baby has fewer wet/soiled diapers or nurses less
    frequently than the goals listed here
    •Mom has symptoms of mastitis
    (sore breast with fever, chills, flu-like aching)




    Weeks two through six
    How often should baby be nursing?
    Frequent nursing in the early weeks is important for establishing a good milk supply. Most newborns need to nurse 8 - 12+ times per day (24 hours). You CAN'T nurse too often—you CAN nurse too little.

    Nurse at the first signs of hunger (stirring, rooting, hands in mouth)—don't wait until baby is crying. Allow baby unlimited time at the breast when sucking actively, then offer the second breast. Some newborns are excessively sleepy—wake baby to nurse if 2 hours (during the day) or 4 hours (at night) have passed without nursing. Once baby has established a good weight gain pattern, you can stop waking baby and nurse on baby's cues alone.

    The following things are normal:
    •Frequent and/or long feedings.
    •Varying nursing pattern from day to day.
    •Cluster nursing (very frequent to constant nursing) for several hours—usually evenings—each day. This may coincide with the normal "fussy time" that most babies have in the early months.
    •Growth spurts, where baby nurses more often than usual for several days and may act very fussy. Common growth spurt times in the early weeks are the first few days at home, 7 - 10 days, 2 - 3 weeks and 4 - 6 weeks.
    Is baby getting enough milk?
    Weight gain: The average breastfed newborn gains 6 ounces/week (170 grams/week). Consult with baby's doctor and your lactation consultant if baby is not gaining as expected.

    Dirty diapers: Expect 3-4+ stools daily that are the size of a US quarter (2.5 cm) or larger. Some babies stool every time they nurse, or even more often--this is normal, too. The normal stool of a breastfed baby is yellow and loose (soft to runny) and may be seedy or curdy. After 4 - 6 weeks, some babies stool less frequently, with stools as infrequent as one every 7-10 days. As long as baby is gaining well, this is normal.

    Wet diapers: Expect 5-6+ wet diapers every 24 hours. To feel what a sufficiently wet diaper is like, pour 3 tablespoons (45 mL) of water into a clean diaper. A piece of tissue in a disposable diaper will help you determine if the diaper is wet. After 6 weeks, wet diapers may drop to 4-5/day but amount of urine will increase to 4-6+ tablespoons (60-90+ mL) as baby's bladder capacity grows.

    Milk supply?
    Some moms worry about milk supply. As long as baby is gaining well on mom's milk alone, then milk supply is good. Between weight checks, a sufficient number of wet and dirty diapers will indicate that baby is getting enough milk.
     
  6. Sophist

    Sophist Well-Known Member

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    I too hope this thread won't be hijacked and that no one feels they are being forced to read the thread if its not the type of information or support they are looking for for feeding their LO.

    AFM--I am really hoping that BF goes well for me this time, as I struggled a lot with my other two kids. BF can be hard and I think its great to have a support thread so that women know they aren't alone and that there are solutions to common problems that cause women to give up. When I had my other kids, it wasn't really considered PC to ever talk about the real challenges of BF, because it might "scare people off" BF. There was quite a bit of mis information circulating. I think things are better now as more women are acknowledging the difficulty of getting a supply established at first and such. I fought tooth & nail to keep BF my kids, and we ran into some unusual compilations of problems and I know that after feeling I "failed" before, its scary to consider trying again. But we are going to give it a go!

    I am planning to join my local LLL and to get a good LC also. The LC's I had with my other kids had limited knowledge and in hindsight from reading and researching more I realize some of our problems could have been addressed. I have heard really good things about the LC's in my area though.

    Whoops--I don't think you can overfeed from the start, because nursing often--even every hour--triggers your body to produce more milk when it actually comes in. We did have to wake my babies to feed, mainly to try to build my supply. I think at first we didn't let them go more than 4-5 hours one time per day (that was the longest stretch) and then nursed like every 1-2 hours the rest of the time. I felt like a milk cow...MOOO!
     
  7. blutea

    blutea Guest

    I'm not very familiar with diabetes and breastfeeding yet but this article might help you. Great question! :thumbup:
    https://www.breastfeed.com/articles/overcoming-difficulties/diabetic-moms-2688/

    "Babies born to diabetic mothers are at an increased risk for diabetes themselves," says Porter. "These babies need to be breastfed for the added protection that breast milk gives."


    Try to wait at least six weeks to introduce a dummy to make sure you milk supply is established first.
     
  8. blutea

    blutea Guest

    Delaying solids can actually reduce the intensity of allergies in babies who have a predisposition toward them. Here's an article on delaying solids- https://www.kellymom.com/nutrition/solids/delay-solids.html

    Two specific points-

    •Delaying solids decreases the risk of food allergies.
    It is well documented that prolonged exclusive breastfeeding results in a lower incidence of food allergies (see Allergy References and Risks of Artificial Feeding). From birth until somewhere between four and six months of age, babies possess what is often referred to as an "open gut." This means that the spaces between the cells of the small intestines will readily allow intact macromolecules, including whole proteins and pathogens, to pass directly into the bloodstream.This is great for your breastfed baby as it allows beneficial antibodies in breastmilk to pass more directly into baby's bloodstream, but it also means that large proteins from other foods (which may predispose baby to allergies) and disease-causing pathogens can pass right through, too. During baby's first 4-6 months, while the gut is still "open," antibodies (sIgA) from breastmilk coat baby's digestive tract and provide passive immunity, reducing the likelihood of illness and allergic reactions before gut closure occurs. Baby starts producing these antibodies on his own at around 6 months, and gut closure should have occurred by this time also. See How Breast Milk Protects Newborns and The Case for the Virgin Gut for more on this subject.


    •Delaying solids helps to protect baby from iron-deficiency anemia.
    The introduction of iron supplements and iron-fortified foods, particularly during the first six months, reduces the efficiency of baby's iron absorption. Healthy, full-term infants who are breastfed exclusively for periods of 6-9 months have been shown to maintain normal hemoglobin values and normal iron stores. In one study (Pisacane, 1995), the researchers concluded that babies who were exclusively breastfed for 7 months (and were not give iron supplements or iron-fortified cereals) had significantly higher hemoglobin levels at one year than breastfed babies who received solid foods earlier than seven months. The researchers found no cases of anemia within the first year in babies breastfed exclusively for seven months and concluded that breastfeeding exclusively for seven months reduces the risk of anemia. See Is Iron-Supplementation Necessary? for more information.



    Anemia is actually uncommon in healthy full term breastfed babies. Here's an article about iron- https://www.kellymom.com/nutrition/vitamins/iron.html

    Can you tell I love kellymom.com. LOL

    My son was about 6 months when he showed an interest in solids. But he didn't really consume them more than 3-5 times a week until he was about a year old. Breast milk really should be the primary nutrition for the first year. During the second six months, solids are more about experimenting and playing with textures and learning how to eat.
     
  9. blutea

    blutea Guest

    Good for you for wanting to try it again. :thumbup:
     
  10. Ember

    Ember Pregnant - 3rd Trimester

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    Congrats on moving to third tri, BT! And thanks for keeping the great info threads going!

    I have a new question about BF. I have had acne on my breasts on occasion (more often than not), especially since getting pregnant. I get all different kinds, whiteheads, blackheads, cystic zits... Will this be okay during BF? I just recently got one right at the edge of my nipple, sometimes I even get them on my areolas. I'm worried not only that it will be extra painful for me, but that it will be unhealthy for the baby. Are there any tips you can offer for treating the acne as well? I already figured that it would be unsafe to use acne medicine on my breasts while breastfeeding, not that using it right now is even helping anyway...
     
  11. newmummy2011

    newmummy2011 Well-Known Member

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    this is a really good thread. i am 4 days overdue and i will be breastfeeding, i have even bought nipples shields to help incase he finds it hard to latch or my nipples get sore. i have also bought a breastpump incase he is stubborn or incase i cant handle breastfeeding. i tested out my breast pump and it doesnt seem to be very good.(the most it gets is a few drops, yet if i squeeze me boobs, milk shoots out! sorry if thats TMI xD its a manual one and its a 'medella' make. any advice on manual breast pumps? is there any tips to help them work better? :)
     
  12. newmummy2011

    newmummy2011 Well-Known Member

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    if you are worried about breastfeeding because of the spots etc, i would recomend NIPPLE SHIELDS. (its basically a teat you put over your nipple AND also decreases the chance of your nipples getting sore! :D)
     
  13. hotpinkangel

    hotpinkangel Well-Known Member

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    I'm just wondering about breastfeeding, I had no support with my other 2 children, but would have liked to have tried it. Now I have a 3 year old and a 4 year old, i honestly can't see how I can breastfeed every 2 hours and have time for my other children. How do people manage? My OH is a lorry driver, often away a lot and away at night too. I can't see it working for me.
     
  14. Dragonfly

    Dragonfly Mother of 4

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    I am so pleased Bluetea has made another thread in here to help people. I am stalking her at present :) So nice to see woman looking forward to breastfeeding to.
     
  15. whoops

    whoops Just me and my LO

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    It'd be great as well if you and other breastfeeding mothers joined in and told us about your own experiences with the questions people have... the info blutea is posting is great, but I'd love to hear more personal experiences from the people here as well...
     
  16. Dragonfly

    Dragonfly Mother of 4

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    I have been breastfeeding for 2 years now, my son is 2 on sunday and I breastfeed 2 now :happydance:I didnt get any help from health professions as its all formula where I am. I had sore nipples and cried on feeds as I didnt know what it was and my HV or doctor didnt know why either and my nipples where dry, flakey and red raw! was cracked nipples and was cured with lansinoh which I keep using as its like a barrier cream keeps them oiled I like to say :haha: I went through that for months though, I really wish someone had of known sooner but it was this forum that I put a thread up of and got answers.
    I had thrush to, daktarin cured that. flat nipple which can still feed with. Had mastitus last month when I came out of hospital as my son was to tired to latch. But that all was ok. Happy feeding once again.

    I know that sounds crap but theres more good than bad happened in the past two years, some woman dont have them probs as they have help and support and advice!. I love feeding my babies, It took a while to get used to I wont lie anbd say it was instant great feeling but when i seen how my son was flourishing on breast milk and how easy it was even with his temperament I stuck with it. I was going to formula feed by the way till he was born and latched himself I had no choice it seems lol I co sleep with my sons also,we have a big bed, one on eather end of me so it can be tricky to feed when both wake but Alex is a good sleeper and very patient. I hardly hear him cry as i can tell when he wants fed. Its a build in instinct like a tie you get with your babies, almost like a psychic thing. :wacko: I dont have to get out of bed at nght and get enough sleep, I was geared up for having a nightmare in hell from what all my friends told me. Said I would never sleep and have a baby vomit on me and scream all night, never had any of that with either. I do believe breastfeeding has made them this way also. William has never been ill or Alex. No colds and we have had flues, coughs, colds and all around him. And its free so i save money more stuff for us :happydance: And my Other half dosnt have to do anything which suits him. I dont mind feeding in the night I get to go back to sleep as breastmilk makes babies sleepy and mummy to. I can feed in a sling and get up and do stuff and I can type in here while breastfeeding! excuse to sit on my bum to. Its quite a lazy persons job :haha:suits me down to the ground. The pain dosnt last it goes and the love you feel from doing it cant be compared to any thing else. I grew to love it, I grew my children myself from scratch. :happydance:
     
  17. SazzleR

    SazzleR Well-Known Member

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    It's really nice to see a positive thread about BF. I'm really keen to BF but this is my first baby so have no idea whether it's going to work out for me but I am really determined. However out of all the mums I've spoken to about BF only 2 have been positive about their experiences. Everyone else has made remarks like 'oh good luck, it didn't work for me', 'it's really painful, you know' and one even said 'you won't stick it out'. All lovely supportive comments!

    Luckily support for BF in my area has improved massively since my SIL had her little girl last year. She struggled & ended up only pumping for 6 weeks. She got so much conflicting advice. They've now introduced a specialised BF counsellor who will meet me before 32 weeks and discuss everything with me and she'll keep coming to see me until 8 weeks after the birth once the MW stops coming. As well as the usual antenatal classes the hospital also run a 'preparing to BF' class so I'm signed up for that.

    I am determined to do it & stick it out til at least 6 months so will be avidly reading this forum for any info. xxx
     
  18. snowy-willow

    snowy-willow Mummy to Ella

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    Just popping back as I saw this thread.

    I tried to breastfeed Ella, but we really struggled and in the end Ella became dehydrated and I began to dread feeding time. I won't go into the problems we had but just wanted to add a few things.

    1) Look now into people you can turn to for support - are there any local groups? is there a local breastfeeding support team? Get the numbers ready in advance so you have them if/when you need them.

    2) When in hospital please don't be afraid to ask for help. The midwives in the hospital I gave birth in made me feel like I was wasting their time when I asked for help.

    3) Ask for help with the latch as soon as you have given birth. I asked for help latching her on as soon as she was born but no help was given for about 4 hours. I do feel this contributed to our difficulties.

    4) When you get home don't be afraid to ask midwives, health visitors, breastfeeding support teams for help.

    5) You are not wasting people's time if you are struggling and need to keep asking for help. Don't feel bad for asking for lots of help.

    6) If for any reason breastfeeding doesn't work out DON'T FEEL GUILTY - YOU ARE NOT A BAD MUM
     
  19. whoops

    whoops Just me and my LO

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    Cheers for that!

    Can I ask - if it's mostly formula where you are, how did you find feeding in public at first? Were people supportive or did you get a negative reaction at all?
     
  20. Cheryl xx

    Cheryl xx Well-Known Member

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    Quick question: A friend mentioned that using lansinoh at night from 36 weeks will help to prevent cracked nipples once baby arrives. Is this true?

    I'm asking because i breastfed Grace for 15 months and loved it but the first couple of weeks were really awful and i want to be able to enjoy it from the start this time.

    I'm looking for any tips anyone has on what i can start doing now to help xx
     
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