Do We Make Our Children Into 'Picky Eaters'...?

Discussion in 'Baby Club' started by Lellow, Jan 25, 2011.

  1. Lellow

    Lellow Déjà poo ... Get it?

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    ...Im about to start weaning in the next 2 weeks and im just really anxious to be honest.
    I want LO to be an all rounder and enjoy all foods but im worried that perhaps getting him to eat SOMETHING is better than nothing and the something ends up being one of those things that isnt nutritionally that great for him...

    My nephew only eats pasta, spaghetti, cous cous - all plain with just butter, chips or chicken breast...along with the usual stuff like cakes, sweets, chocolate etc that all kids love... but, this is cos my sister rather he ate something rather than starved...

    Im confused though cos i dont wana be a push over mum and just opt for the easy option and just give in to what he'll wana eat, but i dont want him to go hungry either, so like in the title, im wondering, do we make our kids picky eaters cos we dont persevere with the good stuff they should have or is it just the way they are...?

    :confused:
     
  2. ILoveShoes

    ILoveShoes Well-Known Member

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    Ooh - brilliant thread!
    I will be doing BLW with LO because, in the past, I have had some serious issues with food and I dont want these to be projected onto him. I want him to be a good 'all round' eater from an early age.
    Studies have shown that babies and children need to taste something 10 times before they'll accept it, so a degree of perseverance is necessary on the part of the parent.
    Also, I don't think we should have to hide veg in meals to get children to eat them. This is why I am really keen on doing BLW.
    xx
     
  3. jensonsmummy

    jensonsmummy Well-Known Member

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    My Lo is ten months and from the start was a great eater, only thing he ever refused was banana, so i thought i was going great. Fast forward four months and all he seems to want is weetabix, custard, pancakes and yogurt. Im exactly like your sister though. I would prefere him to eat something rather than go hungry so dont give in usually till tea time and if he wont eat then he usually gets weetabix. Makes you feel rubbish though cause hes not getting a balanced diet :( but he is offered meals and snacks throughout the day but if he refuses i wont force him
     
  4. Natasha2605

    Natasha2605 2 girlies <3

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    I'll speak from experience of my 3 months of weaning Summer.

    She'll eat anything. Literally anything. Lettuce, Ham, Cucumber, Bread etc. Since we started weaning the only thing she doesn't eat is Mango and Squash.

    I believe if children aren't offered certain foods they will grow up not fond of them. My 3 year old cousin was never really offered fruits and veggies so now at 3 he'll only eat foods like chicken nuggets, Sausages, Burgers etc. OH too, grew up never being offered veggies and now, at 18 he isn't fond of them. I was given loads of fruits, veggies etc and now I still love them.

    If Summer doesn't like a food, such as mangoes and squash as she does now, I just won't offer them for a month or so then casually try again. If she likes them then fab, if not, it's no big deal.

    At 8 months she's a fabulous eater,she likes to try anything. I've never ''forced'' her to eat anything, she's BLW so eats what she wants :)

    I think I'm rambling but yeah, in a way I do think we can make our children become picky eaters xx
     
  5. OmarsMum

    OmarsMum Well-Known Member
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    No hun, they start to pick up what they like & dont like while growing up. Omar was fine with savoury & fruits when we started weaning at 6.5 months. He was eating from what we'r eating & he loved all cooked food. He started to get a bit fussy at 8.5 months & started to refuse some food & fruits. At 1 year he started to have preferences, he eats spagetti but not regular pasta, pita bread & rolls but not toast, plain yoghurt, sour fruits not sweet ones, veggies in stews but not baked/steamed veggies, etc.

    I keep offering him varieties but the way he prefers it. If I try to preserve & offer him food he doesnt like he goes off food & goes for days without eating. They'r like adults, they like & dislike certain food.
     
  6. special_kala

    special_kala love my bugs

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    When i watch shows like super nanny and i see 4 years old who only eat bread or only eats sweets i do think that their parents must play a role in it as obviously they cant go out and buy themselves sweets so at some point they were offered sweets over normal good food.

    If River doesnt eat her dinner we dont offer her anything else. I BLW for this reason as i know that she eats what she needs to and will leave the rest. Some days she barely eats anything but i need to have the trust in her to allow her to do that.

    A child isnt going to starve themselves
     
  7. Mum2b_Claire

    Mum2b_Claire Mummy to Ruby & Scarlett!

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    I think it is our job as parents to provide a choice of different healthy food over the course of the day / week, and our LOs job to decide eat it or not. I don't believe in cajoling a child into eating a certain food.

    I didn't like much veg as a child. My parents would ask me to try a little bit but they would not try and get me to eat it if I didn't like it. They offered lots of diff veg cooked in different ways and I did like some of them. This is how we are with Ruby. I don't expect her like everything because we don't. I strongly believe it is a basic human right to be able to choose whether to eat or not.

    About the 'something rather than nothing' thing - we provide a meal of nutritious food (2 courses at each meal) and if Ruby doesn't want any of it then she is not hungry, I will not go and get cake just because I know she will eat it, if cake hasn't been part of the meal, if that makes any sense.
     
  8. Windmills

    Windmills Well-Known Member

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    I definitely don't think you should force them to eat something they don't want. It's much too early to cause negative associations with eating I think. I don't know, I have trouble getting Daisy to eat things other than fruit and vegetables etc. Her Dad wants her to eat the baby desserts but I hate them, and she'd rather have a yoghurt!
     
  9. ouchwithNo.2

    ouchwithNo.2 Well-Known Member

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    tastes def change as they get older.
    my 6yr old son was a terror with weaning - had no interest until 8/9mths and then was mr puree (at that age with teeth!) until almost a year.
    then he ate very limited food but not through me not trying, I will eat anything even if I am not overly keen with exception to CELERY (blueeergggh)
    I then got desperate and gave him ketchup and slowly he started trying more and more but that was a vicious cirlce - you cant taste food with ketchup and even now at 6yrs (a very good eater - plain food, nothing fancy like curry, chinese etc) he will ask for it with a roast...I do say no!
    because of that this one wont be having ketchup and we are doing BLW so she eats whatever she likes the look of.
    we laughed the other day as LO had a korma @ 6.5mths and her brother being outshone by her tried it too (VERY FIRST TIME!) at 6yrs!!!
    I don't class him as picky anymore, he loves his veg and fruit, just think he has a dull pallette - meat and two veg kind of boy.
    x
     
  10. Lost_Plot

    Lost_Plot GADOING GADADOING DOING

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    I worry about this. I'm quite fussy and my mum is ridiculously fussy. I'm pretty sure that she gave me my food phobia's. She will still at 55 turn her nose up at something and say she doesn't like it without even trying it. I have to force myself to try things. My nan was force fed as a child so I think she over compensated with her children.

    I really want to get out of this viscous circle. My OH goes mad at me about the amount of things I don't like. Especially fish but since I'm allergic to it I think I have a good excuse for that one. He'll eat practically anything so I'm hoping LO will be more like him.

    At the moment LO will eat anything. I know that it probably won't last though. I'm worried that when he's older he'll see me not eat something and think he shouldn't either. I'm thinking that if he does become fussy the only way to deal with it will be rewarding him for trying food rather than being negative about it if he doesn't. And like a PP said not substituting it for cake if I know that's what he will eat. That's easy to say now though while it's not an issue.

    Yikes it's like being on a tightrope trying to do the "right thing".
     
  11. ouchwithNo.2

    ouchwithNo.2 Well-Known Member

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    my OH keeps telling me to buy celery as LO may like to use it as an edible spoon...
    I just can't, the smell...I can't, I was force fed this at junior school, made to sit for 2hrs after lunch whilst I ate it
    DEVILS FOOD!!
     
  12. Celesse

    Celesse Well-Known Member

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    I think the majority of things that we don't like happen because of a negative association with that food. Babies pull all kinds of yucky faces at food, but it doesn't mean they don't like it, just that they aren't sure. But if we then tell them...."oh you didn't like that did you?!!" then they are going to grow up thinking they don't like it.
     
  13. Lost_Plot

    Lost_Plot GADOING GADADOING DOING

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    I second that. Just the smell of it makes me gag lol
     
  14. Lellow

    Lellow Déjà poo ... Get it?

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    :haha: @ DEVIL FOOD!!!

    I dont mind it, but when i was little, i liked to refer to it as cerely :rofl:
     
  15. Mum2b_Claire

    Mum2b_Claire Mummy to Ruby & Scarlett!

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    What is it about celery? I know a few people who hate it! My old boss used to ask me to go and get him his lunch, saying 'get me anything that doesn't contain celery!'
     
  16. xolily

    xolily Well-Known Member

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    in the early days Laila would eat ANYTHING i gave to her, lumps and all. now she'll eat things like fish fingers etc but if she's given something smooth with lumps in she'll spit all the lumps out.. she also point blank refuses any kind of meat :dohh:
     
  17. mrsraggle

    mrsraggle Wifey & Mummy

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    We're the same here. I won't ever offer Ellie something else if she doesn't eat her meal. My mum was the same with me and my brothers and we all love all our food. My DH's mum pandered to my DH and his brothers and basically when I met him she was cooking 4 meals a day to please each of them, one for each brother and one for her and DH - refuse to get myself in that situation! Her youngest son, now at 18, won't eat even a basic sunday roast because he doesn't like it... he has chicken, smiley faces and gravy. No veg!!

    We BLW so, at the moment, Ellie is a great eater and tries everything from fish to cheese, salad, pasta, rice, basically anything. She has her preferences, i.e. she loves toast but that doesn't mean she gets it every breakfast - we mix it up and offer other things too.
     
  18. mrsraggle

    mrsraggle Wifey & Mummy

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    Very true, if Ellie pulls a face I just say "mmm, this is lovely!".
     
  19. Mrs Mayhem

    Mrs Mayhem Guest

    I've worried about this too, we're still a few months off weaning just yet but have been giving it a lot of thought. I'm never gonna force feed my daughter anything, but will offer her everything over time and let her build her own tastes, hopefully she will like a nice mixture of things!!
    I'm pretty much of the opinion that she will eat what we eat (within reason and capability) but we'll let her gradually get used to things. We'll offer her foods and if she chooses to have them then thats fine and everything will be followed up with a cheesy smile and 'mmmm, isn't that yummy?!'
    One day she will no doubt turn to me and say.... 'No mum, thats not bloody yummy at all!!'

    There's foods I don't like so I'll never expect her to like everything, I guess it takes time and experimenting to work out exactly what she will take!


    Oh, and I hate celery too :haha:
     
  20. AppleBlossom

    AppleBlossom Guest

    Celery is disgusting.

    Grace isn't fussy. She'll eat anything (except pasta or processed ham, I have to coax her to eat them) I only make her one meal at a time. If she doesn't eat it, tough. If she had her own way I would make 3 meals until she decided what she wanted, I can't afford to do that. If she is hungry she'll eat it eventually. I know she isn't fussy so the only reason she refuses food is just to be awkward.

    I spent 20 minutes yesterday trying to get her to eat some pasta for her lunch. She screamed and screamed, pushed the bowl away, tried getting down from the table. But she did eat it in the end
     

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