Group 1 carseat V Group 1-3 (all in one)

Discussion in 'Baby Club' started by sam*~*louize, Dec 22, 2009.

  1. sam*~*louize

    sam*~*louize Well-Known Member

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    Did anyone opt for a Group 1-3 carseat like this:
    https://www.argos.co.uk/static/Prod...572/c_3/4|cat_14417572|Car+seats|14417573.htm

    rather than a group 1 alone like this:
    https://www.argos.co.uk/static/Prod...572/c_3/4|cat_14417572|Car+seats|14417573.htm

    I have a small 3 door car, and a friend of mine cannot get her HUGE base of carseat into the rear of my car. The 1-3 also have Side impact protection etc. The group 1-3 obviously is suitable for 9 months plus, but anyone got any opinions / what you've done please?

    Don't want a big debate about rear facing/right wrong etc just thoughts.
    :flower:
     
  2. sobersadie

    sobersadie 2 sons and a daughter :-)

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    From what i can see they are both forward facing - i take it u have the group 0 carrier at the moment? The more expensive one would do you longer but the other one would do till 4 years old then u can get a basic booster seat which doesnt cost much. I had the group 0 carrier then a group 1 and then bought the booster with both my sons but this time i might go for the one that does right up to 11 years old.
     
  3. faille

    faille Mummy & WTT

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    I've been wondering whether the 9m - 11/12yrs are worth it..? Are the seats that they convert into actually any better (or worse) then a standard booster seat?
     
  4. beancounter

    beancounter Well-Known Member

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  5. xxxjacxxx

    xxxjacxxx My Eggo is Preggo!

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    Ive just gone for the group 1 but we have a recaro booster seat thing in the garage that will do him when he outgrows this...I have the maxi cosi tobi but its quite big...is the priori smaller?
     
  6. TigerLady

    TigerLady CaveTiger Clan Mama

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    TBH, I wish I would have gotten a convertable (same as 1-3 I think) instead of one that was to last just the first year. My LO is 5 months and has essentially outgrown his infant seat already. :dohh: I have to get a convertable now anyway.

    As long as the convertable rear faces, I would get one of those. But that is me and for my GIANT baby! :haha:
     
  7. mommyof3co

    mommyof3co Mommy of 4 amazing boys!

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    These aren't like our convertibles, convertible means it goes rear and forward TigerLady :)

    Do these change into booster seats is that how they get the child into 11-12yrs old? Our seats are different but we do have ones like that BUT 98% of them make awful boosters so I would look into that. Do yall have car seat techs there or anything like that that have real knowledge about the safety, not people selling the seats? If so I would ask them how these do as boosters because if it was someone in the US wanting to get a seat that does harness to booster I would tell them there are 2 options that make good boosters the rest are very bad so not to buy them.
     
  8. whiby

    whiby Well-Known Member

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    Which reviews says this about multiple group car seats

    "we’ve found that generally, seats designed to span more than two groups are too much of a compromise in at least one weight group and we haven’t found any Group 1/2/3 seats worth recommending."

    Hope that helps x
     
  9. faille

    faille Mummy & WTT

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    Not sure about Sam Louize, but that helps me a lot, thank you. That's what I had been wondering so thanks x
     
  10. whiby

    whiby Well-Known Member

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    You're welcome, glad to be of help :)
     
  11. jenny_wren

    jenny_wren Queen Spammatha

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    my britax ones from 9 months - 4 years :thumbup:
    which i think is a stage 1 one?

    works fine for our tiny car lol
    will have to get another one in about a year
    because she wont have much leg room when she
    starts growing but for now its perfect :thumbup:

    xx​
     
  12. sam*~*louize

    sam*~*louize Well-Known Member

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    Your's is huuuuge, I'd never get it in my car loL!

    That is actually interestering, you got the link? I'd not thought about it having to do more, so may work less if you get me.


    yep think thats a 1. My mate has one thats supposed to do up to 4 :rofl: her daughter is 2.5yrs and she barely has room. She's a normal sized 2.5 year old aswelll! Hence why I'm reluctant to get one that will last her a year?


    Problem isn't cost (first reply was higher price one better or something, i didn't look at price) it's just the size of my car and it being safe enough for her. It will mostly stay in my car, but occasionally will need to be removed, so don't want it to be a hugge faff about!

    THanks girlies, will nosey at these 1-3 a bit more what they turn into, or find a smaller "base" on the group 1 alone x​
     
  13. whiby

    whiby Well-Known Member

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    The link is here - not sure if it will work as it is a subscribed site:

    https://www.which.co.uk/reviews/child-car-seats/page/how-to-buy-child-car-seats/ If it doesn't the article is here:

    There's more than meets the eye to choosing an appropriate seat for your child, and as a parent, carer or just the driver of a car transporting a child, you are responsible for making sure they are properly protected. Check out our special child safety week quiz to see if you know what's important.

    Choosing the right child car seat always starts with your child’s weight – use our table to find the right size. Your child’s weight is the deciding factor; the ages given are just a guide. Here is our guide on which size child car seat you should be buying:

    Weight categories
    Seat group Weight range Approximate age range
    Group 0 0-10kg (0-22lb) from birth to about 11 months (boys); 14 months (girls)
    Group 0+ 0-13kg (0-29lb) from birth to about 15 months
    Group 1 9-18kg (20-40lb) about 9 months to 4½ years
    Group 2 15-25kg (33lb - 3st 13lb) about 3 years to 7 years
    Group 3 22-36kg (3st 7lb - 5st 9lb) about 6 years to 12 years




    Changing child car seats as your child grows
    It's safest to buy a specific child car seat to suit your child's weight as they grow, rather than try to buy one that covers the whole weight range. Try to keep the baby in the lower group child car seat as long as you can, but make sure you don’t leave it until they're over the weight limit before changing child car seats.

    Buy a specific child car seat to suit your child's weight as they grow

    This means you should use a Group 0+ baby seat up to at least 10kg, then consider changing to a Group 1 child car seat, which they will use until they are at least 15kg.

    At 15kg (about 3-4 years), start thinking about changing to a Group 2/3 child car seat, which will suit the child all the way up to age 12, when they should use the adult seat belt.

    Weight and height
    While the child's weight is the primary factor to consider when choosing an appropriate child car seat, we're sometimes asked about the relevance of a child's height to the child car seat. In most cases, the child will reach the weight limit before being too tall for a child car seat.

    However, your child will have outgrown the child car seat if their eyes are level with the top of the seat. If they're below the thresholds suggested above, seek advice from a qualified child car seat expert (contact your local authority road safety office to find out who this is in your area). In extreme cases they may advise you seek advice from a medical doctor or paediatrician.

    Protecting premature babies
    We regularly receive queries about child car seats for pre-term babies. We asked Farid Bendjellal, Technical Director at Britax about this. He told us: ‘For pre-term and newborn babies, lying flat is ideal for comfort and to reduce the chances of apnia (respiratory problems). But for crash protection, near-vertical is ideal – however, this presents a risk of apnia. Hence a compromise of around 45 degrees is usually chosen for Group 0+ seats.’

    Carrycots
    We've tested several carrycots and lie-flat child car seats, and until now, we haven’t found any that protect satisfactorily. However, in our latest tests, we tried the Britax Baby Safe Sleeper, a new lie-flat restraint designed to carry your newborn baby lying down. It is the first we've seen that protects well in both front and side crashes, and even though it is quite complicated to install, its clear instructions and warning labels mean there's little danger of installing the carrycot incorrectly. In fact, this carrycot scores well enough in all our assessments to be awarded Best Buy status.

    You should always place this carrycot across the back seat, as close to the middle as you can. This may use up more space, but it means the baby is less vulnerable in a crash. Place the baby’s head as far from the door as possible, to try to avoid contact with the door in a crash.

    Consult your doctor before transporting a pre-term baby by car, and keep travel times to a minimum for all newborns.

    Child car seats as part of a travel system
    Some child car seats can be removed from the car and placed in a travel system. Group 0 and 0+ child car seats are most commonly sold as part of travel systems.

    A travel system pushchair can be used with a compatible child car seat and/or carrycot that's designed to attach to the pushchair. They let you easily transfer your baby between car, pushchair and home – great if you spend a lot of time on the move. But be aware that babies should not spend long periods of time in a child car seat.

    Travel systems appear to be a bargain because they're flexible, but the pushchairs are often large and heavy and you need space to store parts you’re not using. Babies will outgrow the child car seat in around 12-15 months.

    Multiple group child car seats
    All child car seats are categorised according to the child's weight. As a child's bone and body structure dramatically changes during the first few years, what's needed from a safety restraint also changes.

    Some seats span different groups. At 15kg (3 to 4 years old) you can change to a Group 2/3 seat, which will suit the child all the way up to age 12, when they should use the adult seat belt.

    But we’ve found that generally, seats designed to span more than two groups are too much of a compromise in at least one weight group and we haven’t found any Group 1/2/3 seats worth recommending.

    Beware of booster seats
    Some Group 3 child car seats are just booster cushions. These raise the child's body to a height suitable for use with the adult seat belt, but the booster cushions are not as safe as Group 3 seats with a full length back and 'wings', which provide extra protection for the head and chest in a side-impact crash.

    The booster seat satisfies the new legal requirement for kids up to 4ft 6in, and they're cheap (about £20-£30) but the full child car seats are safer – if more expensive.

    Choosing a child car seat
    Make a list of the cars in which you might use the seat – for example, friends’ or grandparents’, as well as your own.
    Use our Best Buys as a starting point for choosing a child car seat.
    Find out if a child car seat will fit in a particular make/model of car – check with the child car seat's manufacturer and the car manufacturers for compatibility for use of the seat with the cars in your list.
    If you know which seats you're interested in, try them in your car with your child before you buy. If your child isn’t yet born, try the seat in your car anyway. Don’t wait until the baby is born – unless you have a child car seat, most hospitals won’t discharge you if you're travelling home by car.
    Take advice from a qualified adviser. This is, for most of us at a retailer – a good one will find seats that suit the car or cars you’ll be using it in, and show you how to install it properly. Some areas (like Bromley and Essex), have special centres where you can seek advice and try out seats.
    Universal child car seats
    There’s no such thing as a truly universal child car seat yet. Because the belts and the passenger seats in cars differ greatly from model to model, some child car seats work better in some cars than others – check with the seat manufacturer to make sure the seat you are considering is suited to the cars you want to use it in.

    And you can’t assume your Isofix car will suit all Isofix child car seats – some cars have a false floor which won't work with a support leg, for example.

    Second-hand
    Never buy a second-hand child car seat – it could have been in crash which will have weakened it.
     
  14. sam*~*louize

    sam*~*louize Well-Known Member

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    Many thanks for that article hun, we went and bought a Group 1 only. I read the important bits out to OH and we both said not really thought about it haing to do many jobs so compromising. We've bought the MAXI COSI priori SPS today and fits fine in both cars. Going to put her in it later and see what she thinks!!

    thanks girls x
     

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