Kind of wierd question

Discussion in 'Trying To Conceive' started by bek74, Sep 10, 2007.

  1. bek74

    bek74 Mum of 5

    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2007
    Messages:
    3,409
    Likes Received:
    0
    OK Ladies, most of you know my sitiuation, so this whole TTC thing is making my head spin ( I really don't like google, lol).

    Now when I fell pregnant with my 3 sons, I really put no effort into it, it just happened, but this time around ( now Hubby and I are older and other issues) it just hasn't happened.
    I have started to take my Temp each morning before I get up. Now from what I understand I will see a slight rise on my chart when I am ovulating. So does it rise BEfore I ovulate or After??.
    Then we come to the CM fluid, I have Never taken any notice of that before so this is new. My question is if I am having sex every second day, then how can I tell the difference between CM fluid and Semen??.
    Sorry for the odd questions, but I read here women saying they had sex every other day and there CM fluid was this or that, so how can you tell what is what and what am I exactly looking for.

    Thanks in advance Ladies.
     
  2. Steph

    Steph Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Oct 12, 2006
    Messages:
    764
    Likes Received:
    0
    The rise indicates that ovulation HAS occurred. The idea is to monitor your chart for a few months so you get an idea of when ovulation is likely to occur so you can BD before it!

    Some women notice a slight dip in their chart just before the rise, and this is their cue to BD.Not always though and not always in every chart.

    CM is always there,whereas Semen is only there when you are aroused. So what you're looking for is cm that is the texture of semen....but when you're at your work or something non-sexual.

    You can also get a guide from the position and feel of your cervix, but someone else will need to explain that cos its lost on me that one

    Hope this helps xx
     
  3. bek74

    bek74 Mum of 5

    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2007
    Messages:
    3,409
    Likes Received:
    0
    Thanks Steph, All of this is very new to me. Well I have only started charting my temp this month, so I will see how I go and if this month isn't any luck for me, I will countinue to Chart my temp and hopefully see a pattern.

    As to my CM, so when I am about to ovulate it should be the texture of semen ( is that correct). Because when I wipe I don't notice anything on the paper. Is it possible I don't have that much CM?.

    As to the postion and feel of my cervix, that would be great info, I will wait and see if anyone has any advise on that.

    What do you think of OPK, I have been debating getting one, I did buy the Maybe Baby thing, but for some reason it doesn't work well on me, I don't get any ferns or spots, lol. I don't know maybe I put too much or too little saliva on it, lol

    Again thanks for your reply.
     
  4. Wobbles

    Wobbles BnB Co-Founder ~ Retired

    Joined:
    Aug 31, 2006
    Messages:
    90,191
    Likes Received:
    40
    When you start charting your best going with it every morning & seeing how that chart looks at the end of that cycle. Are you using the online software site to record your temps?

    CM I think sometimes I had it sometimes I didn't although I don't think it was a case of not it was more a case of sometimes it wasn't so noticeable. Fertile CM is like egg yolk and stretchy.

    Cervix .... this baffled me big time and worried me more than anything else I tried (charting, OPKs, etc.) I have used OPKs & charting at the same time.
     
  5. bek74

    bek74 Mum of 5

    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2007
    Messages:
    3,409
    Likes Received:
    0
    Thanks for the info wobbles. I am interested in hearing about the cervix position and what it is supposed to feel like, so anyone with info please come forward.

    Well if it turns out not to be my month, I will try those OPK and see how I go. I get my bloods done on the 20th so hopefully I will find out something then also.

    Cheers Mate
     
  6. Wobbles

    Wobbles BnB Co-Founder ~ Retired

    Joined:
    Aug 31, 2006
    Messages:
    90,191
    Likes Received:
    40
    [h3]Changes in the Position and Firmness of your Cervix[/h3]
    Your cervical position is an optional, secondary fertility sign.
    It may take a few cycles to notice the changes your cervix experiences throughout your fertility cycle. It is a good idea to check when you know you are fertile as indicated by your cervical fluid and then again when you know you are not fertile (as indicated by your thermal shift in your luteal phase) when you are getting started. With this correlation, you will feel more easily the differences between your fertile and non-fertile times.
    When you are approaching ovulation, your cervix will be high and soft (and you may notice that it feels more open also). When you are no longer fertile, your cervix will feel lower, more firm and you may notice that it is more closed. If you are not comfortable checking your cervix or you find the changes difficult to observe, and you are able to observe your cervical fluid easily, checking your cervix is not absolutely essential. If you are comfortable checking your cervix and are able to identify changes, you will benefit from the additional information that will help cross-check your other signs.

    [h4]Checking your Cervix[/h4]
    If you choose to check your cervical position as an indicator of fertility here are some guidelines:
    • To avoid the possibility of infection, always check the cervix with clean hands.
    • Check the cervix once a day after menses. You only need to check once a day, unlike cervical fluid which you may check several times a day.
    • Check your cervix at the same time every day as it may change throughout the day.
    • Use the same position for checking your cervix throughout the cycle as changing positions will change your observation of cervical height.
    • Squatting or placing one foot on a stool (or toilet seat) are good positions.
    • Relax. (You will be able to more easily relax as you gain more experience).
    • Insert one or two fingers into the vagina. At the back of the vagina, you should be able to feel your cervix. If you feel something at the back of your vagina that stops your fingers, then you have found your cervix. If you apply gentle pressure you will notice that it feels smooth, round and firmer that the surrounding vaginal tissues.
    • Feel your cervix and make the following observations:
      • Is the cervix high or low? (it is more difficult to reach it is high)
      • Does the cervix feel soft or firm?
      • Does the cervix feel open or closed? (Women who have already had children may notice that the cervix always feels slightly open).
      • Does the cervix feel wet or dry?
      • Do you feel any bumps on your cervix? (If you feel bumps that do not seem to be related to your fertility pattern, talk to your doctor right away)
    • Record observations.
    [h4]Recording Cervical Changes[/h4]
    Fertility Friend offers three fields on the data entry page that relate to cervical position. You can record the position, firmness, and openness of your cervix.
    • Position: Your cervical position may be: low, medium or high. Your cervix heightens and becomes harder to reach as you approach your most fertile time. The important thing is to notice how it changes throughout your cycle in relation to your fertility. Observations can be subjective so you need to notice your own unique changes. There are really no rules to apply as you have to notice the changes relatively as they change. This may take a few cycles to really notice.
      • Low: Record "low" for your least fertile cervical position. This is the position where it is easiest to feel and reach your cervix.
      • Medium: Record "medium" for the position between your lowest and highest.
      • High: Record "high" when your cervix is hardest to reach. You may not even be able to reach it. You will notice that it feels more wet, soft and open at this time as well. This is your most fertile cervical position.
    • Firmness: Again, the issue is to notice the changes in the texture of your cervix relatively throughout your cycle as it changes. Like your cervical position, it may take a few cycles to notice your own pattern. To get an idea of what you are looking for, check when you know you are fertile (when you have eggwhite cervical fluid) and when you are sure you are not (after ovulation has been confirmed by 3 high temperatures) so that you know what you are looking for. At your least fertile time, both before and after ovulation, your cervix will feel the most hard and firm, a bit like the tip of your nose. As you approach ovulation, your cervix will soften, feeling more like your lips. You can record the firmness of your cervix as Firm, Medium, or Soft.
      • Firm: Record "firm" as the most hard and firm texture you experience throughout your cycle. Your cervix will likely also be low and quite easy to reach at this time.
      • Medium: Record "medium" when your cervix feels between your most firm and most soft. You may feel this just before you approach your more fertile time before ovulation and after ovulation as well.
      • Soft: Record "soft" when your cervix feels the most soft. It will probably feel quite wet and high at this time as well and you may even notice that it also feels open. It may be hard to reach. This is your most fertile cervical texture.
    • Openness: Not everyone is able to observe this sign, but you may also notice that your cervix feels more open when you are most fertile. If you are not able to observe this sign (many people are not), simply do not use it. The firmness and position of your cervix should provide enough additional insight into the changes in your cervix to allow you to cross-check your other signs if this is the case. This observation can also be quite subjective because women who have already given birth may notice that their cervix always feels slightly open. Women who have never given birth, may not notice the change at all or may notice that the cervix only opens slightly at their most fertile time. Like your other cervix signs, you should record how your cervix changes relatively throughout your cycle. If you are certain that you can notice the change in the openness of your cervix you should record the following:
      • Closed: Record closed when your cervix feels at its most closed, least open position.
      • Medium: Record medium when your cervix is slightly open.
      • Open: Record open when your cervix feels at its most open position.
     
  7. bek74

    bek74 Mum of 5

    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2007
    Messages:
    3,409
    Likes Received:
    0
    Wow thanks Wobbles, I feel confused and nervous already, lol. I will see how I go.

    Thankyou for finding that info. :hugs:
     

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice