Learning How to Breastfeed in Hospital

Discussion in 'Pregnancy - Third Trimester' started by Widget, Apr 3, 2011.

  1. Widget

    Widget Pregnant with Baby #1

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    The thread on breastfeeding in public got me thinking about something....

    We were told in our prenatal classes that a nurse or lactation consultant has to check our latch before we are allowed to take our breastfed babies home after delivery.

    The thing is, I am very insecure about my breasts and I have issues with them being touched. I'm less intimidated by my lady garden being seen by doctors and nurses! I don't want anybody to bother me with checking my latch.... in my humble opinion, they can see if the baby is getting enough nutrition by the amount of soiled diapers! I have watched enough videos and read enough breastfeeding manuals that I feel confident in my own abilities. If I need help, I will ask but I don't want it forced on me!

    I expressed this concern to my mother.... My mother then confided in me that when she had me she was breastfeeding in the hospital when a very masculine female nurse came in and pretty well man-handled her breasts. She said that the nurse did not ask permission, she just roughly grabbed mom's tender breasts and shoved her nipple in my mouth. It was very violating for her.

    Anybody else having similar concerns?
     
  2. BabyBoyNYC

    BabyBoyNYC Well-Known Member

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    for me i'm not too concerned with a nurse seeing my boobs, because they see EVERYTHING! I'm more concerned about getting frusterated and having people around me when something is not going right or not working turns me into a mega bitch. Maybe the nurse will be a great one and it wont be as bad as you think.
     
  3. AP

    AP Well-Known Member
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    i had to get a nurse to show me how to hand express. Generally i would have been weirded out by this lady who basically milked me into a syringe :dohh: but at the time you're too eager to learn, too curious and high on adrenline when baby arrives. It's funny how the way you see things changes at the time.

    when we tried the breast a nurse did help me, but again, it wasnt something i was thinking about, i didnt think "here! shes grabbing me boobs?!"

    if the assistance is offered take it hun, lots of people dont get help and it causes issues later on. x
     
  4. aliss

    aliss Well-Known Member

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    I was always asked by a nurse before she touched me. Nurses and other emergency service workers (like myself) are very used to people being blunt with their demands - feel free to just tell her, before she touches you, that you do not wish to be touched. You won't cause offense at all. Just let her know your boundaries.
     
  5. nullaby

    nullaby Well-Known Member

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    When my daughter was in the NICU there were 3 diff lactation specialists who tried very hard to help me. In the beginning I was really shy especially since one is a tad smaller. They all asked if it would be okay to show me what to do, and the first time someone else touches the boobs your a little like "ok this could be awkward" but they helped me so much!! I never felt violated, and I always felt they had our best interest at heart. If you dont want them to touch you at all then you need to voice that up front but really I think a papsmear is much more embarrassing and we all live through that!

    This time around I will take all the hands-on help I can get again! You can read everything there is but I would never refuse actual help!
     
  6. GDrag

    GDrag Well-Known Member

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    I would firmly but politely tell them that I will ask for help when needed. With my DS I also had this experience, the nurses didn't ask just grabbed a handfull and squished it into DS's mouth. I hated this and will definitely not allow it this time around. Anyway, how can they refuse you to leave hospital if they haven't checked LO's latch? Do they check the ff babies also???

    It's YOUR body and YOUR baby, don't let them bully you!
     
  7. KayBea

    KayBea Mummy to Xanthia Lily

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    Ive already had my LO and was breastfeeding im the hospital. A midwife or nurse has to check baby is latched on properly before you go but with me they never ouch my breasts they just leaned over my shoulder to see if LO had a mouthful and was feeding properly..
    They shouldnt touch you without asking..

    X
     
  8. PeanutBean

    PeanutBean Mumma to Byron & Indigo

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    Well my experience was one MW telling me one hold right after delivery. I went home with a jaundiced baby with bad latch and who wasn't even really feeding. There's a lot if talk about services but my personal experience was that it was only talk!

    Assuming your hospital is better I would just make clear you don't want people to see. You may care less once you have your babe in your arms you may not. I am sure a competent lactation specialist will be able to explain holds without needing to touch you or even see.
     
  9. amygwen

    amygwen Mom to Kenny & Gwendoline

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    I had similar concerns, I'm very self conscious. But honestly when you're in the hospital and the nurses and doctors are trying to make sure your child is getting fed properly - you won't care about them looking at you. I'm glad they were looking so they could at least tell me what I was doing wrong and how to fix it. Because when you get home, you won't have someone to actually SHOW you how to do it. The nurses would also look down below to make sure I was bleeding the right amount into my pad. I mean, it's really awkward but they are nurses - they see these types of things EVERY single day!
     
  10. 0_o

    0_o Me, Df, Ds + Dd

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    I had a similar experience with being "milked" aka hand expressed. Midwives/nurses never did anything unless they had permission. Generally they look at babys face to see if the jaw muscles are moving correctly, indicating a good latch and feed. I also had a feeding specialist come to my house for a month afterwards once or twice a week until I was comfortable feeding properly etc. She was so helpful. and i agree, at the time, you just want to feed your baby well and you won't even think twice about getting your boobs out.XX
     
  11. Lois

    Lois Me, OH, Evie & Joseph

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    If all is going well with the baby's latch then the nurse/midwife/feeding specialist will be able to see that without touching your breast. If your baby is having difficulty latching then you'll probably find that you'd rather have someone touch your breast to help you than carry on with the distress of knowing it isn't right and your baby is distressed from thirst and hunger. Newborns can lose weight and become dehydrated rapidly if they are not receiving enough milk and it really is worth accepting the help on offer. Nowadays health professionals are much more aware of respecting people's rights and so noone should touch your breast without checking with you first.

    From experience (both personal and that of friends) I would say that before you have your baby breastfeeding seems a lot more straight-forward than it may be in reality. The common message of "it's natural, anyone can do it" is oversimplified and can leave women feeling like they are failing when it turns out to be much trickier than they expected.

    Lx
     

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