Refused epidurals! Panic stations. . .

Discussion in 'Pregnancy - Second Trimester' started by SparkleBug, Jun 2, 2011.

  1. SparkleBug

    SparkleBug Well-Known Member

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    After talking to lots of local mummies, the general consensus from my local maternity hospital is that epidurals are rarely given. Even those in obstetrics led care and not midwife led care are limited. I put in my birth plan that I want one and may decide not to if I'm coping but my MW wants it the other way around - without and ask if needed. She fed me the same line all the other local mummies recited to me.

    'I was told if I needed one it was literally down the hall thru a double set of doors and I could have one, but when the day came they said it was too early for it and by the time they checked me again it was too late'

    Can I just say this is almost Word for word what all the mummies locally have told me. Even when it was in their birth plan. Why is the hospital avoiding giving these and what can I do to ensure I can have one if needed? I'm genuinely worried sick about this!!!!!
     
  2. lesleyann

    lesleyann Mummy

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    Because unless there are problems/complications, there is no Need for one just a Want for one? and they are trying to get women to explore all drugs before jumping straight to an Epi. I have no idea btw
     
  3. jacks mummy

    jacks mummy Well-Known Member

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    i dont really no what to say hun tbh i just didnt want to read and run. i had an epidural with my son and tbh i wouldnt recomend one BUT i do believe that it is a mums choice to have one if she wants one!! it slowed my labour rite down so im hoping to not have one this time. all i can say is speak to ur midwife and see what she says next time u go in and explain how disstressd this is making u! i asked for mine and was given it within 15mins! i was lucky i also no some ladies that had to wait hours for theres. i hope u get one hun and i hope u manage to sort something out good luck x
     
  4. lesleyann

    lesleyann Mummy

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    Also im sure ive heard from a midwife before if you can sit still enough for them to put the line in because you have focased (sp?) you would be able to get though labour if you used the same determination. just a thought..

    Just remember at the end of the day if you really need one they will give you one but even on the day without what may be your hospital policy it may be impossible to get one from the people being busy dealing with c-sec's etc so you can never be garenteed a Epi
     
  5. Samantha675

    Samantha675 Maybe baby #3?!?

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    It can start a cycle of interventions that leads to an unnessecary c-section.
     
  6. stouffer

    stouffer Well-Known Member

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    Uh oh. Now you have me worried. I don't cope very well with pain and tend to faint easily. Where abouts in Scotland are you?
     
  7. Fergie

    Fergie Rainbows & angel mummy

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    Sorry but that's not on at all !. Okay so i'm not in any way wanting an epidural, but i think it' my choice and i will not be dictated to by a midwife or any NHS trust. Kick up a fuss hun they cannot refuse you and if you're in any way worried i'd contact your patient liason before you go into labour so you can have formal documentation about your care.

    Hugs xx
     
  8. Tantan

    Tantan Nathan, Brandon & Bump

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    I had an epidural on my second son and I ended up having a C section. His heartbeat dropped just after I got it.
     
  9. allaboard

    allaboard Well-Known Member

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    Some times the anaesthesist is just not available. And having an epidural too early can slow progress of labour (women can't move around and help baby work through the pelvis to dilate efficiently). Over zealous epidural usage leads to what is called a Cascade of Interventions. Ultimately leading to instrumental or section.

    Epidurals definitely have a place in midwifery/obstetric care when the woman is so exhausted from a long labour/baby is struggling, and it's not progressing well, and of course every woman has a right to choose an epidural anyway, but the hospital will discourage putting one in early (or too late) for very good reasons. Anaesthesists aren't sat there with a cuppa avoiding putting one in women - they are always just busy with several other women wanting the same thing at the same time or in an emergency section.

    All labours progress differently, and midwives and doctors are rightly constrained by protcol and procedures so unless you are "ready" for an epidural, giving you one is counter-productive to getting the birth you want. Sometimes women crack on quickly, and then it's too late especially during "transition" when many women ask for one, but that's just before the baby exits and it all gets too much. It's impossible to predict how quickly labour moves on, but the maternity services have to act responsibly - if they are saying that it's too early or too late, that's because it is. I can tell you that women are so much more glad they didn't have one in the end, even if that epidural was wanted initially. Birthing without one can bring a real sense of achievement to women who thought they wouldnt be able to manage.
     
  10. milf2be

    milf2be Guest

    if you go private you will get one without question. iv heard at the portland they leave the epidural in for a few days after the birth too so you dont have to put up with the pain after either...
     
  11. allaboard

    allaboard Well-Known Member

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    It's not good to be laid up for any period of time particularly in the immediate postnatal period. Thrombosis is the most common cause of maternal death in this country. You really need to be up and about as soon as possible. And that's speaking as a Mum whose insides were literally hanging out and i was torn beyond belief, standing was painful as the blood throbbed on my bits, but i'd rather that than be paralysed and risk my life.
     
  12. oaklvr

    oaklvr Well-Known Member

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    I would put it in my plan that you want one, just in case you really DO want one. Everyone's experience is different, and while I wouldn't recommend one either, there's not shame in it. What I would do is wait until you are 4-5 cm. If it is given before that, it will probably be the worst time. Epidurals can at times, help you progress, and relax enough to get things going better, although this is rare and not preferable to natural birth. I'd rather have an epi than some other form of pain med that caused me to be all out of it though.
     
  13. tweedy

    tweedy Well-Known Member

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    in my local hospital, the anetists covers several theatres and wards, has pre-op checks to do and are in attendance throughout an entire operation and is not just dedicated to the labour ward, so are very busy people.

    with my daughter i got one before they even started my labour as my bp was sky high and they were very concerned, i felt a total of 2 oxytocin induced contractions and was restrainted to the bed. i went on to have an emergency section 11 hours later, but the same guy who put in my epi, topped it up half was through the day and was there for my whole surgery, he was beeped about 3 times, by labour ward looking an epi for another woman, who had to wait, my body went into shock and he managed to stop me from having a major episode in theatre, so although the other woman had to wait that bit longer, he may have saved my life.

    now i know if it is me waiting, they are not punishing me, they could be saving someone's life!
     
  14. keeks1987

    keeks1987 Due baby2 in April

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    SparkleBug - This is off topic, but i love your sign off!
     
  15. milf2be

    milf2be Guest

    if the postnatal bit was because of what i said: they are actually mobile epidurals and patient administered too. i was gobsmacked when i found this out yesterday. imagine if that was available on the nhs....
     
  16. horse_mad

    horse_mad Mum of 2 boys

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    Hi, didn't want to read and run...I wanted an epi last time but was too late getting to hops then because I didn't have it I had to get general anaesthetic for section and wasn't allowed out of bed for a day after therefore didn't see LO til hours after he was born. If you want one get one that's my advice!but you won't really know til the time comes.I defo wouldn't turn it down!!!don't worry it will all fit into place anyway when the big day comes! I'm not even making a birth plan this time and as long as baby and mammy get thru it ok I'll be happy! :flower:
     
  17. lynnikins

    lynnikins Well-Known Member

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    the cost of an epidural really increases the cost to the NHS of your birth, yes it shouldnt be what drives us in making a choice but the money spent on epidurals often escalates into more costly measures like a c-section, and longer hospital stays, extra care for the newborn etc..... the truth is the money used on this "pain relief" could be funding having another MW on staff to assist women giving birth or another NeoNatal nurse or equipment for the hospital. the NHS cuts are affecting maternity care and if having to yell a bit longer for an epidural is the cost then wouldnt you rather than than see NICU's closed down for lack of funding.
    Locally my hospital is now going to be pooling the pathology and several other " labs " with 2 other hospitals in the area meaning it will take longer for our blood test results to come back and alot of other things like getting blood for a newborn thats poorly and needs it in an emergancy is all going to take long as there will be less facilitys and staff to do those jobs.

    how about we be mature ladies and realise that our bodies are supposed to be able to do this without interference , yes not being in pain is ideal but who of us got pregnant thinking motherhood and labor wouldnt hurt ? None of us we all knew we were making a sacrifice and if sacrificing my epidural means better care is given to someone whos actually sick and in need of medical help then Im gonna do it!
     
  18. punk_pig

    punk_pig Guest

    allaboard said it perfectly!

    Im sure all those Mummies you spoke to asked for the epidural at transition by which time it is too late but you are so close to meeting your baby at that stage that you can start to focus on pushing and that makes it easier to deal with in my experience!!
     
  19. happysaurus

    happysaurus Well-Known Member

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    If you faint with the pain I am willing to be you will definitely get an epidural - you can't give birth unconscious! My friend didn't want an epi but was induced and started fainting and the doctors persuaded her to get an epi.
     

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