keeping a nearly 6yr old dry at night

Discussion in 'Kids & Teenagers' started by Dani_b, Jan 29, 2011.

  1. Dani_b

    Dani_b Expecting number 4 🤰🏼❤️💙❤

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    my DD will be 6 in april, she still wets at night time, she wears pull ups because if she wets when asleep she is is such a deep sleep that she doenst wake, she ended up very sore when wearing knickers for bed and asked for the pull ups back, i can lift her to put her on the toilet when i go to bed as my bathroom is down stairs, i do leave a potty out her her in her room, but dont want her sister (nearly 2) getting hold of it
     
  2. MrsRabbit

    MrsRabbit Guest

    Stop liquids a couple hours before bed, take her potty before you go to bed. Really it's all you can do. You can get reusable training pants for big kids which look more like underwear.
     
  3. Dani_b

    Dani_b Expecting number 4 🤰🏼❤️💙❤

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    not seen reusable training pants, where might i find them? spending a fortune on pull up for her aswell as nappies for the little 2
     
  4. midori1999

    midori1999 Well-Known Member

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    You might be entitled to free pulls ups or bed mats for her. Have you seen your GP? Generally they won't do anything until about 7, but it wouldn't hurt to ask and they can refer you to the community nurse for pull ups.

    Also, have a look here:

    https://www.eric.org.uk/

    Night time wetting can be caused because the child is not producing the right hormone to prevent the body producing too much urine at night yet, in which case it can be 'cured' with medication until the child is mature enough to produce the hormone themself.

    A bed alarm can help too. You clip a sensor to the child's pants and this makes an alarm go off as soon as the child starts to wee. (the parents might need to wake the child initially if they are too deep a sleeper to wake up by themselves) Over time, the alarm teaches the child to learn to wake up when the bladder is full. Apparenly they are successful in about 80% of cases.

    Limiting or stopping soft drinks such as fizzy or lots of citrus can help too, plus making sure she drinks plenty during the day to help 'train' her bladder and making sure she properly empties her bladder each time she needs the toilet.

    If you 'lift' the child (eg. get them up when you go to bed) they should be fully awake.

    However, I wouldn't worry too much for another year or so. My Step Son is 14 and still wets almost every night. Sadly, his Mum hasn't been very helpful. (eg. refused to wake him when the bed alarm didn't, wouldn't remind him to put the alarm on a bedtime)
     
  5. Dani_b

    Dani_b Expecting number 4 🤰🏼❤️💙❤

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    she doesnt have drinks after tea time, and sips water through out the day in school, as they are allowed to have a water bottle with them in school. ill try the lifting and putting her on the potty. she really wants to get out of pull ups as she sees them as for babies
     
  6. purpleblond

    purpleblond Mum of 2, expecting 3rd

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    My eldest had this problem, the advice we got from the enurisis clinic was this:

    Drink as much fluid as she can during the day, (sometimes its also to do with bladder capacity so drinking lots during the day will help her hold more if that makes sense) if you let school know discreetly they may let her have more access to her water bottle.

    Sips of water after tea time (don't drink milk -can't remember why but just told not milk)

    Go to the toilet before bed, relax on the toilet and count to 20 ie pass urine slowly rather than rushing as my DD used to do, then get her to clean her teeth and then go back again to the toilet (sounds like a bit of a nuisance but this will ensure the bladder is empty).

    If she does wet the bed clothes, ask her to help you strip the bed (I was horrified when they first said this but apparently it is supposed to help train the brain, it's not meant as a punishment).

    Most importantly don't make a huge fuss over it, she will get there eventually

    Doctors won't usually do anything till about 7 or 8 years old, health visitors or school nurse may also be able to offer advice, ours ran an enurisis clinic.

    Hope this helps, good luck xx
     
  7. MrsBop

    MrsBop Mummy of 2

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    My little lad is the same, he'll be 6 in a couple of weeks and he wears pull ups on a night, he doesn't wet every night but arond 50% of the week but like your DD he doesn't wake up when he's done it :( he's very embarrassed by it, poor thing, it's quite common and they do eventually grow out of it (so my mum says anyway :haha:) I've bought him the extra large Asda's own pull ups which works out cheaper than dry nites etc. xx
     
  8. Dani_b

    Dani_b Expecting number 4 🤰🏼❤️💙❤

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    i get the extra large (size 6) asda pull ups when they have them in stock
     
  9. Amy_T

    Amy_T Mummy of 3 gorgeous girls

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    My daughter was the same, she's 5 and dry now (other than the very occasional accident). To be honest, I didn't do a great deal, I started lifting her at first which worked to start with but then it really disturbed her sleep and one night I just forgot and she stayed dry. I know it's not much help but I think they do it when they're ready. x
     

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