Pneumonia risk to pregnancy in first tri?

Discussion in 'Pregnancy Club' started by snugglebot, Apr 17, 2009.

  1. snugglebot

    snugglebot Very blessed

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    My best friend has pneumonia. She just got diagnosed today. She was ill at easter, when we were over, but she didn't get checked out until today.

    I'm feeling fine so far.

    Can I go visit her once her coughing has stopped? Her Dr. told her she can go back to work once it does, so I assume it isn't contagious then right?

    What are the risks to me as a pregnant women in the first tri?

    p.s. I am about to go on holidays for 3 weeks so will be away from my doctor too.
     
  2. snugglebot

    snugglebot Very blessed

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    Some resources I found.... from the internet so take it for what it is worth:

    https://www.obgynsurvey.com/pt/re/obg...195629!8091!-1
    Apart from an abortion at 10 weeks' gestation there were no fetal deaths. Live-born infants had a mean birth weight of 3320 gm and a mean 1-minute Apgar score of 8.6. None of the newborn infants had evident anomalies. The only woman who died was not pregnant. The 28 pregnant women received many different antibiotics, most commonly cefuroxime, azithromycin, and erythromycin. Pregnant women were twice as likely to be admitted to hospital than nonpregnant women in the same age group, but they had a shorter length of stay.

    These findings suggest that pregnant women tolerate pneumonia well and are unlikely to develop pulmonary or immunological complications. Pregnancy itself does not increase the risk of pneumonia. Neither the clinical findings nor the outcomes differ from those in nonpregnant women with pneumonia.

    https://www.pq.lung.ca/diseases-malad...nia-pneumonie/
    Viral pneumonia

    Half of all pneumonias are due to viruses. Viruses often cause respiratory infections that mainly affect the upper respiratory tract. Certain viruses however target the lungs and produce pneumonia, especially in children. Most viral pneumonias are localized and do not tend to spread but the primitive form of viral pneumonia caused by the influenza virus (flu virus) is severe and occasionally fatal. The virus invades the lungs and multiplies without producing observable symptoms. Victims of this form of pneumonia are mostly pregnant women or individuals with cardiovascular conditions or respiratory diseases.
     
  3. Vestirse

    Vestirse Maker of the boobie booze

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    Pneumonia itself is not contagious really. It is the original virus or bacteria that caused pneumonia that can be contagious. People are usually only contagious though at the very beginning. When the body is actually fighting it, they tend to become less so. But this is just the trend. I think people can be contagious for up to three weeks.

    But I'd still stay away as I despise being sick. It's 100 times worse in pregnancy too, esp in the first tri as you really can't take anything!!! Seriously, it's like being in the dark ages...

    If you do go, make sure to thoroughly wash your hands and not touch your nose or eyes. If she even sneezes or coughs, try to turn away.
     

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