Are property rentals legally allowed to advertise as "no children"?

Discussion in 'General Chatter' started by Belle25, Oct 3, 2013.

  1. lovelylaura

    lovelylaura 3 little girls

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    I've seen it before even on 3 bed house's which i just dont get. Its a family house i doubt any couple or single person for that would want to rent a 3 bed house :S I do understand why they do it though as children are messy little things! but i think people have to realise what kind of house they are trying to rent out. A 3/4 bed house with 2 bathrooms isn't going to be wanted by couples.
     
  2. girlnboots

    girlnboots Mother to 4 furbabies

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    I know growing up, my brother was a little hellion. Putting holes in walls, breaking windows, etc.

    I don't think its right to discriminate against ALL families, but I'd be much more willing to rent to a family of one or two girls than one with a half dozen boys. Then again, it still just depends on the family itself.

    In my area, you have to fill out an application for almost every rental, and the landlord can accept or deny you at their own discretion, just like a job application. Definitely gets them around some legalities, but it helps them protect their property.
     
  3. lhancock90

    lhancock90 2 toddlers, 1 MMC, WTT#3

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    I've never seen no kids, but we paid another £100 in order to have a dog and cat.
     
  4. MrsOC

    MrsOC Guest

    I rent out my old place from before I moved in with my other half.

    First tenants had three young children and 2 dogs. Expensive wallpaper was ripped off the walls, expensive carpets were ruined. A 1920s dresser that was my great grandmothers was chewed by the dogs and had to be destroyed along with other furniture. The deposit didn't even make a dent in the cost of the damage and I had to make an insurance claim.

    Since then- no pets and no children.

    I don't have anything against DSS claimants because despite their faults they did pay their rent on time.
     
  5. MrsOC

    MrsOC Guest

    You would be surprised. The number of young working professionals who share a property for starters. Especially in the likes of London where the cost of renting is astronomical.

    I have a couple renting out my 3 bed place at the moment. They are in their 60s and have no children and therefore no grandchildren but I do know they like to entertain and as they are from Scotland they probably have people to stay quite often.
     
  6. Hunbun

    Hunbun Wifey & Mummy

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    Yeah we rent out our 3 bedroom to a couple and their 'children' who are 18 and 17. I think some people are just put off by small children who quite often do damage because they don't know any better.
     
  7. SmartieMeUp

    SmartieMeUp Mum of 2 girls.

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    I'm pretty sure the bond/deposit of the house is to actually cover any damages made in the house while living there.

    Although it's mainly fully furnished properties here which don't allow children, or ones which have unavoidable dangers to children. You do get people who don't give a toss about where they're living and will carelessly destroy the place.

    I'm sure if you meet up with the agency and prove to them you are well presented and respectful, they may make exceptions.
     
  8. Evansangel

    Evansangel Well-Known Member

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    I haven't seen 'no children' on adverts around here, but I have seen 'professional sharers only' which is a polite way of saying no children IMO.
     
  9. wishuwerehere

    wishuwerehere dh, me and 2dds

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    I've found 'no pet' and 'no children' are often negotiable if you speak directly with the landlord, although i don't know about the othetlr things. I can understand it though, my parents in law had to pull up carpets after their tenants moved out - one months rent isn't going to cover that!
     
  10. ellismum

    ellismum Ellis' mum!!

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    Why on earth would you leave expensive items of furniture/carpeting etc in you property that you were renting out???
     
  11. ellismum

    ellismum Ellis' mum!!

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    Oh, I'd also like to know what "faults" us DSS claimants have?
     
  12. girlnboots

    girlnboots Mother to 4 furbabies

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    Here in the states, its common to rent out apartments and homes ranging from just appliances to full-furnishings. I have no idea if that's common for anywhere else though.

    However, If you didn't have faults, you wouldn't be on dss. Maybe faults wasn't the right word....hardships? Hardships sounds better. Either way, I don't think the pp meant any offense.
     
  13. hayz_baby

    hayz_baby Mummy to 3 boys!

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    I have meet understood no dss at all, all tht does is out everyone who claims hb as a stereotype from Jeremy Kyle, when in reality u r more likely to receive ur rent as ur receiving help. No dss is soo common here, considering rent is so high where I live most people claim hb. It even puts us out even though I am a ft worker we receive hb help, they don't take that into consideration. I have seen a few with no children come up. And a few with no smoking, (kinda understand no smokers) I don't understand no children especially on larger properties. I can't see how they can discriminate. What happens if a young couple fall pregnant during tenency? Kick u out at the next available opportunity. Renting sucks. I don't think people really understand what it is like (sorry turned into a rant)
     
  14. lilyd

    lilyd Well-Known Member

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    When we first rented our property out (couldn't sell it and were moving areas, were losing £40 per month on rent compared to mortgage) we assumed that people would treat a property and other peoples possessions the same way they would treat their own. We therefore saw no need to remove items of furniture.

    It just isn't realistic for either practical/financial reasons to re carpet your home before you leave it - and for the same reasons as above, didn't see the need to.

    We also learned the hard way that some people have no respect for others property.

    If you are a professional landlord then I'm sure you would do things differently, but many people rent their home out for a variety of different reasons and just can't afford to refurnish it prior to doing so.
     
  15. lilyd

    lilyd Well-Known Member

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    I think the poster was referring to a particular DSS claimant that they had as a tenant having faults, rather than all DSS claimants.
     
  16. missbabypo

    missbabypo Mummy to Riley and Bump!

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    A lot of the places around here that say no children are houses that are being let by a person rather than a company if that makes sense.
     
  17. auntiesarah25

    auntiesarah25 Well-Known Member

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    Renters cannot discriminate against familial status is: kids, single parents and so on. As far as I know. . . check if they are an equal housing opportunity, if so they are in violation.
     
  18. bumpy_j

    bumpy_j Well-Known Member

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    I think it's more common with furnished properties, or ones that may have features that are unsafe for children. I assume if the child did something like knock over an unsecured, tall bookshelf on top of themselves, the landlord may possibly be blamed.
     
  19. suzib76

    suzib76 Well-Known Member

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    When it comes to council and housing associations then they have no right to be discriminative, when we are talking about people's own personal house then they have every right to do with it what they please. That's perfectly reasonable.
     
  20. bumpy_j

    bumpy_j Well-Known Member

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    Its pretty common, generally to entice people to pay a higher rent. If I had the money (and probably no kids), I'd pay extra to be surrounded by lovely antiques.
     

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