Prenatal Testing?

Discussion in 'Pregnancy - First Trimester' started by Fairy_Girl, Sep 12, 2007.

  1. Fairy_Girl

    Fairy_Girl Active Member

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    I was wondering what is all really necessary for prenatal testing. I'm 20 DH is 22 we have had a previous miscarriage. No big health issues on either side of the family other than my great grandma and my grandma have diabetes so I'm pretty sure I will have more of a chance of Gestational diabetes but what else is all really necessary?
     
  2. Mango

    Mango Well-Known Member

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    Hi FairyGirl, I recently asked a similar que because I was so tired of doing blood tests! There are a few tests that they do as part of general prenatal care and other tests are optional.

    At first they do an initial tests to analyse the following:

    -blood type, Rh factor
    -iron deficiency etc.
    -gestational diabetes
    -immunity to certain diseases
    -whether she has a sexually transmitted disease (STD) or cervical cancer

    Between 16-18 weeks they usually do a 2nd blood test to identify high risks of down syndrome. Then usually around 20 weeks you get a very detailed ultrasound where they look for abnormalities and any other potential problems.

    With regards to the extra testing, they are usually optional. However if you fit into any of the below categories they may recommend more.

    -are age 35 or older
    -have had a premature baby
    -have had a baby with a birth defect — especially heart or genetic problems
    -have high blood pressure, diabetes, lupus, asthma, or a seizure disorder
    -have a family history of mental ******ation (or a partner who does)
     
  3. Fairy_Girl

    Fairy_Girl Active Member

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    Do you know what kind of testing they do for the mental ******ation thing? DH has family with mental health problems but I'm terrified of the Amnio test. The needle is huge and the chance of complications scares me. Other than that the only other thing that might put me in the category of other testing is my seizure disorder. Oh and I'm O negative blood type but I and my doctor already know this and Ill be forced to have the shots. I'm just really wondering if the Amnio is going to be necessary for me or not. :(
     
  4. Imi

    Imi .

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    I shouldn't have thought so hun??

    But then im no doctor ... best thing you caan do is ask your MW or consultant if you have to have amnio ... but i don'tr think you HAVE to have anything hunni

    xxx
     
  5. Mango

    Mango Well-Known Member

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    IMI's right, you don't HAVE to get anything done. Usually they will do a blood test FIRST to check for high risks down syndrome. The needle that you are talking about (through the tummy) is not conducted unless you are over 35 and/or your doc shows some concern from your blood test results. A blood test is usally conducted around the 16-18 week mark, a lil needle in the arm, nothing serious. I posted some info found online below for u hun.

    I would not worry about anything just yet FairyGirl, your baby should be just fine. There are "prenatal test", that we ALL have to do along the way just to make sure our lil ones are healthy and strong :)

    Blood Test Info

    A blood test called the "triple screen" can be done between the 15th and the 22nd weeks of pregnancy, but it's more accurate when done between the 16th and 18th weeks. The triple screen cannot tell for sure if your baby has Down syndrome, but it can tell if the risk is higher. If the test is positive, it means your risk of having a baby with Down syndrome is higher. But remember that many women with a positive triple screen have babies without Down syndrome.

    A negative triple screen means that the chance of Down syndrome is low. However, it doesn't guarantee that a baby doesn't have Down syndrome.

    The mother's blood is checked for three items: alpha-fetoprotein (AFP), unconjugated estriol (uE3) and human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG). These three are independent measurements, and when taken along with the maternal age (discussed below), can calculate the risk of having a baby with Down syndrome.

    Sources: https://www.childbirthsolutions.com/articles/pregnancy/downtesting/index.php
    https://familydoctor.org/online/famdocen/home/children/parents/special/birth/610.html
     

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