Hope long did it take your premiee to breastfeed?

Discussion in 'Premature & NICU Babies' started by Katiedw21, Aug 28, 2018.

  1. Katiedw21

    Katiedw21 Well-Known Member

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    Hello all, i had my little one at 33 weeks August 20th, ther first 2 days he breastfed pretty good the day he was born he fed for 25 minutes ther next day he nursed for 45 minutes but he then became jaundiced and i wasn't allowed to even hold him for 24 hours i feel this really set us back in nursing. Since then we have been putting him to breast 4 times a day while tube feeding he'll sometimes start to latch but not suck. He's deff not getting much milk if any from the tap. We use nipple shield no nipple shield I'm doing everything i can to no avail. So my question is for you premiee moms who successfully ebf how long did it take to get them to latch consistently? This will really be our major hurdle to going home and it really worries me that it's going to prolong our stay! He's still in ther incubator until he consistently doesn't lose weight but he's already almost ready to be out so its really the breastfeeding that we need to conquer. I was told that at 34 weeks a light bulb would go off and he would just start so I'm still waiting. So how long did breastfeeding take and how long were they in the NICU before they got to go home?
     
  2. misspriss

    misspriss Well-Known Member

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    ODS was 33w5d. He was kept on IV fluid only for a few days and then had jaundice. He was born on a Thursday morning and we latched on Monday night, so 5 days. We had to use a nipple shield. It was 1-2 feedings a day until I started rooming in when he was 35 weeks, then it was every feeding. He was fed by NG tube alternatively, no bottles. No bottles, no confusion. I roomed in for 5 days doing all feeds by mouth.

    All in all he was in the NICU 18 days. He used the nipple shields until 10.5 weeks. We breastfed until his 4th birthday. He's in kindy this year :)
     
  3. Katiedw21

    Katiedw21 Well-Known Member

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    That's so amazing! Thank you for this! He latched today pretty well which but my hospital doesn't do rooming in until they are already ready to go home which i wish tget did because i feel he'd progress much quicker
     
  4. misspriss

    misspriss Well-Known Member

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    Well that was in anticipation of him going home. I couldn't until he could maintain his temp outside the incubator, then it was room in until he no longer needed nose tube feeds.
     
  5. misspriss

    misspriss Well-Known Member

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  6. Nuthatch

    Nuthatch Well-Known Member

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    Katie-- I am so sorry your little one is in the nicu. It is such a scary time and place and it certainly doesn't allow time for mama to heal and rest.

    My baby was born August 9 at 37 weeks in an emergency induction. He was not a preemie, but he was a 4 pounder (surprise--- we were expecting an almost 7 pound baby) who couldn't manage his temp, keep his sugars up, or keep his weight on. Because of this we spent 8 days in the nicu. He was on a sugar drip for days, a nose tube, and then needed fortified breastmilk. He breastfed really well the first day then slowly just lost his ability to latch well. At this point, I was pumping 10 times a day so he at least was only getting breastmilk plus the extra powder formula. I pretty much gave up hope that we would be ble to exclusively breastfeed ever and resigned myself to pumping and maybe the occasional breastfeeding session.
    BUT, once we got home and comfortable (not in the cramped nicu room with terrible wooden rocking chairs), we got into a rhythm and he started to breastfeed. It took some time, but we are now exclusively breastfeeding and I dont have to pump or supplement anymore.

    I know our journeys are very different, but I have hope your breastfeeding journey will turn a corner soon so you can take your precious baby home. It can work even if it seems impossible in the moment. Good luck!
     
  7. Katiedw21

    Katiedw21 Well-Known Member

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    Thank you for sharing your story with me! Im hoping that when we get home we can really work on ther breastfeeding it does brake my heart a little bit because i just want to do what's best for him but breastfeeding is what i feel is best and don't want to lose the opportunity to do so! I started allowing bottles today as this will help get him home faster since he's not latching like he should i really hope this doesn't ruin my chance of breastfeeding but i want him home so bad!
     
  8. Katiedw21

    Katiedw21 Well-Known Member

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  9. Peonies83

    Peonies83 Well-Known Member

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    Katie, I am not sure if you are still struggling with breastfeeding, but I wanted to give you hope that it can get better!

    My baby was born at 32 weeks and spent the first six weeks of her life in the NICU. (She is eight weeks now). For the first three weeks, she was not allowed to breastfeed or bottle feed. She was fed only through a feeding tube in her nose with the milk I pumped. When I was first allow to try breastfeeding, i was only allowed to feed her twice a day. The hospital gradually increase the amount of times I could try to feed her. It was a struggle since breastfeeding was hard and many of the nurses preferred that I give her a bottle as they could know for certain how much she ate. We were told in the NICU that breastfeeding is much harder for babies than bottle feeding. I really worried in the hospital that she would not be able to consistently breastfeed, because a bottle is easier. I did breastfeed, the hospital would follow it up with milk through her feeding tube. It definitely seemed to be an uphill battle.

    Now that she has been home a couple of weeks, she is breastfeeding all but one feeding a day. That is so her daddy can give her a bottle when he gets home from work. It is still hard and a little frustrating, but it seems to be getting easier every day.

    Are things getting easier with feeding your little one?
     
  10. Katiedw21

    Katiedw21 Well-Known Member

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    Hey! Thank you for all your advice! We are home now we've been home a week tomorrowand thingsare easier but not where i want them yet. He's doing ok breastfeeding, he'll only latch with the shield and he still does the suck suck pause suck suck pause and tires out pretty easy. We were sent home having to use 3 formula bottles a day, but he's never been on formula before this so he's not having it, he spits it out he really won't even take breastmilk in a bottle he just wants to nurse so we will see what he's gained Come friday.

    Did or does your daughter use a shield? If so how do you get them to latch without it? And when doop they start nursing consistent instead of stop go stop go? He also never poops but has a ton of wet diapers, sorry for the billion questions i do not have lactation consultants where i live and ther closest la leche league is an hour away
     
  11. Peonies83

    Peonies83 Well-Known Member

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    My daughter did use a nipple shield. The nurses at the hospital stressed that she should only use it temporarily, so this past week she has not been using it. She does have trouble latching without it, I have to compress my nipple and areola (if that makes sense) and guide it into her mouth when she opens it. She does not open wide enough to latch without help. The nurses lactation consultant I saw in the hospital suggested tat I start every session at home without the sheets and only use it if she is have trouble that session.

    About half the time she nurses consistently, but the other times she will take a few sucks and pause a long while. I've found that if I kiss her head or stroke her cheek, she will take a few more sucks. Some sessions I have to be really patient and just keep waking her if she dozes off mid feeding.

    My daughter had a lot of poopy diapers when she was first born. Now she has about one with poop a day. When I took her to the doctor a few days ago, I was told that was normal. In the NICU, they only worried if it had been 48 hours without a poop. Does your baby poop at least that often? I think the wet diapers are a good sign that he is eating not dehyrated.

    Hopefully my rambling helps. I am still learning as a first time mom, but I am happy to answer anything that I can.
     
  12. Blah11

    Blah11 ☼ Mummy to Amelie ☼

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    Remy is 4 weeks tomorrow (37+5 corrected) and still hasn’t managed.
     
  13. Katiedw21

    Katiedw21 Well-Known Member

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    Hey blah! How is breastfeeding going now? Is Remy sleeping well?
     
  14. Wicky78

    Wicky78 Well-Known Member

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    I know I'm a little late to this thread, but my DD was born at 34 weeks in April and was surprisingly small (3 lb 15 oz) so she was in the NICU 5 weeks with tube feedings and some bottle feedings. She couldn't latch on at all until she had been home about 2 weeks, which was just after she would have been due. She still isn't able to nurse efficiently and has a lot of trouble latching without the nipple shield, but I think this has more to do with her tongue tie (corrected Sept 5) than her age/size. I say all of this to let you know that it's not hopeless if you're still using the nipple shield and having to make extra effort to breastfeed at this stage. We at least have gotten to where she can latch on, express milk, and be satisfied without any meltdowns, which is a HUGE improvement over a couple of months ago. My DD is 23 weeks now, or 17 (almost 18) weeks adjusted age. I hope that helps. Hang in there! No one told me breastfeeding would be this much WORK but I still love it! Oh, and I almost forgot to say that she had a lot of pauses in her feeding for many weeks. It has to do with their stamina when they're so tiny and premature. The Speech Therapist (who worked with us on feeding issues in the hospital) said to think of nursing as the equivalent of running a marathon in terms of energy needed and exertion. Sucking a pacifier is like taking a walk around the block. So it's a lot of work for these little babies!
     

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