Mild autism

Discussion in 'Toddler & Pre-School' started by emyandpotato, Oct 2, 2013.

  1. emyandpotato

    emyandpotato Well-Known Member

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    Does anyone else's child have mild autism? Can you tell me what the signs are? Can a child be autistic and still sociable? My OH has recently started talking about how he thinks LO has it. I didn't think he did- he has something wrong with him, we don't know what, but I thought autism was out of the question cos he quite likes to interact with people and animals. But now I'm doubting. Obviously I don't mind either way, I'm just curious really!
     
  2. SarahBear

    SarahBear Well-Known Member

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    A child can enjoy socializing and still have autism. Autism does not determine one's interest in interaction although it can affect one's interest. If a child has autism but likes to interact, they will still have difficulty interacting in an appropriate manner.
     
  3. Cassie123

    Cassie123 Well-Known Member

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  4. AngelofTroy

    AngelofTroy Well-Known Member

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    Autism is a spectrum disorder, so it's understandable that the OP talked about "mild autism" not knowing much about the terminology, however we tend to use the term high functioning.
    To answer OP's question, lots of people with ASD enjoy interaction, but as a PP said it may be inappropriate at times. For example a young man I know loves people and wants to work with children. He's high functioning and got good grades in his GCSEs, he is quite confident. However he will stand 6 inches away from you and not understand personal space, and he constantly reminds himself that (out loud) he shouldn't hug people he doesn't know. He's very kind, but needs support identifying others emotions, for example he will ask "are you happy that I'm here today?" several times or will need to ask "is he sad? He's crying so he must be sad right?".
     
  5. emyandpotato

    emyandpotato Well-Known Member

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    Sorry :wacko: I wasn't trying to annoy anyone. I don't know much about it and I don't think he's very severe if he has it at all because I've seen the behaviour of highly autistic kids and it isn't the same.

    Thanks. I don't think he has it to be honest. I think my OH is just worried and jumping to conclusions. I dunno. The HV knows something's up, they don't have the time to properly do anything right now cos it's nothing dire.
     
  6. Cassie123

    Cassie123 Well-Known Member

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    I know you weren't trying to annoy anyone I just thought i'd say so you know some people really object to the phrase. :flower:

    If you wanted to write down the things you are worried about then a lot of people on here have experience with a wide range of difficulties and delays I am sure someone will be able to help.

    Also if you write down now just for your own records exactly what he can and can't do now and a list of your worries. Update it every month or so. It may make a diagnosis in the future easier.
     
  7. suzib76

    suzib76 Well-Known Member

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    What exactly is making oh think your child may be autistic?
     
  8. emyandpotato

    emyandpotato Well-Known Member

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    He's been slow on everything really. His speech is the main worry. He makes one syllable sounds. That's it. When he's with other children his age there is a noticeable difference with most things. He gets very much in to his own world sometimes and won't see you or hear you unless he chooses too. Also my dad is on the autistic spectrum, though functions fine and has a business, but there are many similar behaviours. Sorry it's hard to explain. Logically I don't think he has autism but my OH has got the idea in his head and is quite certain. Sorry. Don't mean to be wasting anyone's time.
     
  9. Cassie123

    Cassie123 Well-Known Member

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    Unfortunately it is one of those things that will become more obvious as he gets older. He will either catch up or he won't. A lot of the things to look out for are really common in toddlers anyway.
    Clumsiness
    Obsessive about things (hand washing, routine etc)
    Sensitive to noise, light, touch.
    Very fussy about food.

    Even if he does all of these things it is in no way a sign of something being wrong. All toddlers go through phases.
    It will become more obvious around the age of 3 when most children grow out of these things. He might grow out of them too or he might not.

    As far as his speech goes if the HV and docs are unwilling to do anything yet the best thing you can do is talk to him constantly, socialise as much as possible and teach him to sign.
    For children with slow speech signing is really good because it gives them a way to communicate. This makes them less likely to get frustrated and have tantrums.
    You can make up your own signs or get a book on makaton signing.
     
  10. emyandpotato

    emyandpotato Well-Known Member

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    Yeah we do signing. That was a worry too because although he was very upset at his inability to communicate he didn't pick up signing until quite recently despite us doing it since six months. See some of the signs you mentioned fit and some don't. Maybe it's just a global development delay. I just wish I knew. I feel like I"m just doing something wrong.
     
  11. sam2eb

    sam2eb Well-Known Member

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    My son has asd. He loves being around other kids and really wants to join in with them but he just doesn't know how to.

    Does your little boy take an interest in what your doing? Does he point at things?
     
  12. Eleanor ace

    Eleanor ace Well-Known Member

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    Have you had his hearing checked? That would be my first step, making one syllable sounds, general speech delay, going into his own world, not hearing you unless he chooses to (which could in fact be him focusing on what he's doing and not focusing on trying to hear) can all be signs of hearing issues. I've had children in Reception who's parents think they have ASD turn out to actually just need gromits, but it's been missed by the HV's and doctors until the school pushed for a referral.
     
  13. babyjan

    babyjan Mum&expecting#2

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    Why would mild autism annoy people? I'm sorry it's a serious question I have no idea about it at all, hope you don't mind me asking OP
     
  14. sam2eb

    sam2eb Well-Known Member

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    It doesn't annoy me but I imagine it may be that even if someone is high functioning they may still have serious difficulties with other aspects of life due to their autism.
     
  15. aliss

    aliss Well-Known Member

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    Alexandre is high-functioning (which is what you probably consider "mild")

    He is extremely sociable and has never once shown a sign of aggression. When it comes to sociability though (and this is "his" thing), he will be very interactive with other children but kind of out to lunch in some ways.

    For example, if another kid comes up to him and asks him they want to play together, he'll start blabbering in a completely unrelated conversation as if the other kid was talking about that with him.

    I would say he is still too young to worry about this, at age 2, Alex was just very active, quite a bit more than usual. It isn't until 3+ that the difference becomes quite remarkable, particularly when speech comes into play (or should but doesn't).

    We're still very new in the diagnosis (a week!!) so I'm still learning. But I've learned a lot of things about it and know now that there are a lot of misconceptions about it for sure!
     
  16. Cassie123

    Cassie123 Well-Known Member

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    Because autism isn't 'mild'. No matter how well an autistic person appears to deal with their symptoms they can still be struggling like mad underneath all day every day to appear 'normal'.

    High functioning is used instead because it doesn't undermine the severity of the difficulties.
     
  17. babyjan

    babyjan Mum&expecting#2

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    Thanks ladies, I completely understand now x
     
  18. suzib76

    suzib76 Well-Known Member

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    It bothers me when people try to categorise autism.

    How can you say someone is high functioning? I know of a guy who has a PHD but his autism means he could never live independently because he isn't able to manage basic things like the cooker etc, so is he high functioning because of his achievements or low functioning because he still lives with his parents at 34 ?

    My son copes incredibly well within school with subtle support he rarely has a meltdown in school now, does that mean he has mild autism? If you factor in how he manages out with that setting it's a different picture altogether

    That's just 2 examples of why it really doesn't work to try and put autism into boxes, that's why we talk of the autism spectrum. One day my son could be over to the left of that spectrum and the next day completely over to the other side
     
  19. AP

    AP Well-Known Member
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    This year I believe where I am they are wiping out the terms - autism will be autism and thats it. And I think that's right, you can't define a child with autism.

    Anywho back to the OP's question - TBH, you know best. You could speak to your GP or HV. You may get a questionnaire to fill in. They can start the process off if they think its necessary. I cant see things screaming out though, I could say the same about our Tori and he speech is only taking off a bit now. She has a bit of speech therapy but theres no other issues. She'll go into her own world and blank me. But knowing what I do now and bursting my head at all the ASD workshops ive taken, I know shes ok.
     
  20. aliss

    aliss Well-Known Member

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    Oh well I just say high functioning because that's what I was told by the psych... :shrug: I'm not into the semantics of it, they are all different. But I'm sure she wishes to differentiate between levels of severity that's all
     

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