Risks of Morning After Pill not working?

Discussion in 'Waiting To Try' started by bigbloomerz, Apr 16, 2009.

  1. bigbloomerz

    bigbloomerz Well-Known Member

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    Has anyone heard or know of anyone that took the Morning After Pill and it didnt work?

    I took it last Friday and im pretty sure that I was ovulating at the end of last week, so im a bit worried. x
     
  2. sleepinbeauty

    sleepinbeauty WTT#1 after marriage

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    Lemmie look up some stats for you.... *searches*

    "When a woman needs Plan B, she will have to get it very quickly. She can only start it within 72 hours (three days) after intercourse. But, sooner is better than later. On day one, 95% of pregnancies are prevented, compared with 85% on the second day, and 60% for those starting on the third day."

    "
    These documents are for informational purposes only and are not intended to constitute medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment.
    Emergency Contraception (Morning After Pill)
    Quick Facts
    Emergency Contraception (Morning After Pill) at a Glance

    * Birth control you can use to prevent pregnancy up to five days after unprotected sex
    * Safe and effective
    * Available at health centers and drugstores
    * Costs vary from $10 to $70

    emergency contraception (morning after pill)
    Is Emergency Contraception Right for Me?

    Accidents happen — that's why we have emergency contraception (the morning after pill). Did you have intercourse without using protection? Did you forget to use your birth control correctly? Did the condom break, leaving you worried about becoming pregnant? If so, emergency contraception might be a good choice for you.

    Here are some of the most common questions we hear women ask about emergency contraception. We hope the answers help you decide if it is right for you.
    Highlights

    * What Is Emergency Contraception?
    * Why Is Emergency Contraception Sometimes
    Called the Morning After Pill?
    * How Does Emergency Contraception Work?
    * How Effective Is Emergency Contraception?
    * How Safe Is Emergency Contraception?
    * What Are the Disadvantages of Emergency Contraception?
    * How Do I Get Emergency Contraception?
    * How Much Does Emergency Contraception Cost?
    * How Do I Use Emergency Contraception?

    What Is Emergency Contraception?

    Emergency contraception (EC) is a safe and effective way to prevent pregnancy after unprotected intercourse. It can be started up to five days (120 hours) after unprotected intercourse.

    You may want EC if

    * The condom broke or slipped off, and he ejaculated in your vagina.
    * You forgot to take your birth control pills, insert your ring, or apply your patch.
    * Your diaphragm or cap slipped out of place, and he ejaculated inside your vagina.
    * You miscalculated your "safe" days.
    * He didn't pull out in time.
    * You weren't using any birth control.
    * You were forced to have unprotected vaginal sex, or were raped.

    Emergency contraception is also known as emergency birth control, backup birth control, the morning after pill, and by the brand name Plan B. The most commonly used kind of emergency contraception is Plan B.
    Why Is Emergency Contraception Sometimes Called the Morning After Pill?

    Many people call emergency contraception or Plan B the "morning after pill." But the name is a little confusing. You can use emergency contraception any time, up to five days, after unprotected intercourse — not just the "morning after."

    Also, you take at least two pills when you use Plan B, and many more pills if you use other types of emergency contraception — there is not just one pill. That's why the term "emergency contraception" is more accurate than "morning after pill."

    Here we will use "emergency contraception" and "morning after pill" to mean any kind of pills that can be taken after intercourse to prevent pregnancy.
    How Does Emergency Contraception Work?

    Emergency contraception is made of the same hormones found in birth control pills. Hormones are chemicals made in our bodies. They control how different parts of the body work.

    The hormones in the morning after pill work by keeping a woman's ovaries from releasing eggs — ovulation. Pregnancy cannot happen if there is no egg to join with sperm. The hormones in the morning after pill also prevent pregnancy by thickening a woman's cervical mucus. The mucus blocks sperm and keeps it from joining with an egg.

    Some people say that the morning after pill works by keeping a fertilized egg from attaching to the lining of the uterus. But there is no proof that this actually happens.

    You might have also heard that the morning after pill causes an abortion. But that's not true. The morning after pill is not the abortion pill. Emergency contraception is birth control, not abortion.

    Plan B is a brand of hormone pills specially packaged as emergency contraception. Plan B contains the hormone progestin.

    Certain brands of birth control pills may also be used as backup birth control. Our chart can show you how. Usually, birth control pills with two hormones — progestin and estrogen — are the ones used for EC.

    A ParaGard IUD can also be used as backup birth control if inserted within 120 hours — five days — after unprotected intercourse. It is 99.9 percent effective. Talk with your health care provider if you're interested in getting an IUD.
    How Effective Is Emergency Contraception?

    Effectiveness is an important and common concern — especially when it comes to EC. The morning after pill is an effective form of backup birth control. However, it is not as effective as ongoing use of the pill, the ring, the patch, the shot or the IUD, when they are used correctly.

    Plan B reduces the risk of pregnancy by 89 percent when started within 72 hours — or three days — after unprotected intercourse.

    * Only 1 out of 100 women will become pregnant after taking Plan B if started within three days.

    When birth control pills are used as emergency contraception, they reduce the risk of pregnancy by 75 percent when started within three days after unprotected intercourse.

    * Only 2 out of 100 women will become pregnant after taking birth control pills as emergency contraception if started within three days.

    Emergency contraception can be started up to 120 hours — five days — after unprotected intercourse. The sooner it is started, the better.

    You need to use the morning after pill to prevent pregnancy after each time you have unprotected intercourse. The morning after pill will not prevent pregnancy for any unprotected intercourse you may have after taking the pills.

    The morning after pill offers no protection against sexually transmitted infections. You may want to consider testing for infections if there is a possibility that unprotected sex put you at risk."


    I hope that helps....seems that your odds are alright. *hugs*
     
  3. bigbloomerz

    bigbloomerz Well-Known Member

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    "Has gone Square eyed after reading so much" lol Thanks hun, feel a bit better now! I took it like 4 hours afterwards so I think im pretty safe :) x
     
  4. freckleonear

    freckleonear Crunchy mummy

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    I took the morning after pill a few years ago and it caused an ectopic pregnancy. That's pretty rare though.

    The morning after pill doesn't usually prevent ovulation, it prevents implantation, so even if you ovulated I'm sure you'll still be fine.
     
  5. sleepinbeauty

    sleepinbeauty WTT#1 after marriage

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    hahaha, sorry. i figured the more i gave you, the better you might feel soo....i gave you a book. :lol:
     
  6. lozzy21

    lozzy21 Mummy to Niamh

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    My sister was a map baby.
     
  7. Pinkgirl

    Pinkgirl Well-Known Member

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    Woooow lots of into threre, to be fair didnt know that much about morning after pill x
     
  8. Serene123

    Serene123 Guest

    My daughter is a MAP baby x
     
  9. sleepinbeauty

    sleepinbeauty WTT#1 after marriage

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    my 2 sisters and I are plain ol' pill babies actually. Dad jokes and calls us "oops," "again?," and "WHAT??"

    he doesn't mean it though <3
     
  10. Pyrrhic

    Pyrrhic Well-Known Member

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    I took the MAP this month, and have been having a lot of symptoms and got a faint :bfp:. However, I think that the most likely scenario is that the MAP screwed up my cycle and the test was faulty.
     
  11. MoonMuffin

    MoonMuffin Mom of 2!

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    It wont work if your already pregnant, so the sooner you use it the more effective it is.
     
  12. bigbloomerz

    bigbloomerz Well-Known Member

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    :rofl: thanks hun, really do appreciate it! x
     

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