Dentist treatment during pregnancy?? Advice x

Discussion in 'Pregnancy - First Trimester' started by Rebecca_B, Dec 11, 2009.

  1. Rebecca_B

    Rebecca_B Well-Known Member

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    Hi Ladies,

    Wondered if any of you know how limited the treatment you can have at the dentist?

    Can you just have a basic clean and polish or can you have fillings and crowns done??

    Ihave a front tooth that really needs a crown as it had a root canal 18months ago and it has now got a discoloured look and i really notice it in photos now. Didn't know if i would be able to get it done now i'm preggers or if i would have to wait until after........

    I know you cannot have xrays but not sure about local anesthetic???


    Anyone a dentist ,dental nurse or just knows these things???????????


    xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
     
  2. Jenni1388

    Jenni1388 Well-Known Member

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    Just found this....

    Pregnancy can be a wonderful time, filled with joy and excitement. Unfortunately, it can also be quite a frustrating time, especially if you are experiencing dental problems throughout your pregnancy. Pregnant women are actually more prone to dental complications and it is important to get these complications treated effectively. If left untreated, some of them can actually put you at an increased risk for pregnancy complications.

    There are a variety of dental problems that women are more prone to experience during pregnancy. These issues include periodontal disease, pregnancy tumors, and pregnancy gingivitis.

    Pregnancy Gingivitis
    Pregnancy gingivitis is the most common dental concern during pregnancy, affecting almost 50% of all pregnant women. Pregnancy gingivitis causes your gums to become red, puffy, and inflamed. It can also trigger bleeding gums when you are brushing and flossing.

    Pregnancy gingivitis is caused by bacteria that form between your teeth and gums. When you eat, tiny particles of food get stuck between your gums and teeth. These particles soon attract bacteria, resulting in inflamed gums. Anyone can be affected by gingivitis but pregnant women are at greater risk. This is because amplified levels of progesterone and estrogen lead to increased blood flow throughout the body, especially to the gums.

    Periodontal Disease
    If left untreated, gingivitis can progress into periodontal disease. Also known as gum disease, this is a severe gum infection, which destroys the bones and fibers that help to keep your teeth in place.

    Periodontal gum disease can cause some very unpleasant side effects, including bleeding from the gums, tooth loss, and infection. Periodontal disease is of particular concern during pregnancy. An increased risk for both preterm labor and having a low birthweight baby is associated with periodontal disease.

    Pregnancy Tumors
    Pregnancy tumors can form if you are suffering from pregnancy gingivitis or periodontal disease. Also known as pyogenic granulomas, these tumors are growths that form on your gums. They can sometimes make it hard to speak, eat, and swallow, and may cause pain or discomfort. These tumors can be removed by your dentist if necessary.

    Dental Treatments
    It is important to get proper dental care during pregnancy. Regular dental checkups and good hygiene practices at home can keep your teeth and gums free of tartar and plaque, and help to prevent or reduce the effects of pregnancy gingivitis and periodontal disease. However, there are some things to keep in mind when you visit your dentist in order to ensure that you and your baby stay healthy throughout your pregnancy.

    Regular Cleanings
    You should visit your dentist at least once during your pregnancy, to have a regular cleaning and routine dental checkup. Dental appointments are typically made during the second trimester, after your baby has formed his vital organs. Though regular cleanings aren’t harmful during the first or third trimesters, having your cleanings during the second trimester can reduce any possible risks to your baby. If you are suffering from gingivitis or gum disease, your dentist can provide you with gum disease treatment during your regular checkups.

    Infections
    If you are experiencing any toothaches, or if you are noticing blood or pus around your gum line, you should also visit with your dentist. These are signs of infection, which can be quite dangerous during pregnancy. Gum or other mouth infections can spread throughout your body, increasing the risks of pregnancy complications, like miscarriage.

    Dental Emergencies
    Other dental emergencies, like a broken tooth or cavity, should also be seen by your dentist. However, treatment will usually be put off until after you have given birth, in order to avoid any possible complications. If you are in a lot of pain, or if the problem can be solved quickly and easily, your dentist may choose to give you treatment during your pregnancy. Be sure to speak with your prenatal health care provider before you undergo any treatments though.

    Treatments to Avoid at the Dentist
    Certain treatments should be left until after you have given birth to your baby. Teeth whitening and other cosmetic procedures should be held off until after your baby is born. If you require a root canal or other extensive dental procedure this can also wait until after your baby is born, unless you are in severe pain.

    Exposure to x-rays should also be avoided during your pregnancy, unless absolutely necessary. Though dental x-rays give off minimal radiation, it is safer to avoid unnecessary dental x-rays until the postpartum period. Any procedure that requires you to sit for long periods of time should also be avoided. Sitting in the dentist’s chair can put pressure on the inferior vena cava, a major blood vessel in your body that supplies your lower extremities. This can cause fainting and loss of consciousness.

    Dental Care At Home
    The best way to ensure healthy teeth and gums is to follow a daily dental regimen at home. Here are some tips on how to keep those pearly whites healthy and happy!

    Brush at least twice daily with a fluoride toothpaste, and floss once a day.
    Switch toothpastes if you find that yours triggers nausea.
    Rinse your mouth out with warm water or an antibacterial mouthwash if you are suffering from vomiting and morning sickness.
    Avoid eating too many sugary foods, as these can cause plaque and tartar buildup.
    Eat a healthy pregnancy diet, with lots of calcium, vitamin B12 and vitamin C. These vitamins help to build healthy gums and teeth.
     
  3. Rebecca_B

    Rebecca_B Well-Known Member

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    D'you think i could have a crown done then??? xxxxx
     
  4. Jenni1388

    Jenni1388 Well-Known Member

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    I'd call and ask. Just let them know you are expecting. Can't hurt to ask.

    Take Care!

    Jennie
     
  5. gina8177

    gina8177 Married with 1 baby boy

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    I had to get a filling done when I was TTC. My dentist will not perform anything that requires freezing on pregnant patients (can't remember if it was limited to the first tri or not). I couldn't go in during the TWW and had to wait until I knew I wasn't pregnant.

    I'd give your dentist a quick call and see what they think.
     
  6. littleblonde

    littleblonde kacey and sophie

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    hello. im 27 weeks pregnant and have an abcess on my gum next to a broken tooth. I had 1 course of antibiotics which didnt clear it. So today i had the tooth out with local anesthetic. The dentist said that i would be causing myself more problems not having it done. She promised it was safe and i got 3 different dentists at different places to comfirm it. I was told that any pain should be treated as you body will fight that instaed of help the baby. She has kicked this afternoon so i hope that means shes ok. Im glad i had it done as i kept hearing horror storys of pus and pregnancy. I would consult a dentist for advise and then get advise from your midwife. Get 2nd opinions as well if it makes you feel better.
     
  7. Moraine

    Moraine Mom to a cutie pie!

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    I have some dental surgery scheduled for this coming Monday, I have also had two x-rays already while pregnant. The x-rays are no where near your tummy and they put a lead apron on you.

    Anyhoo, I had many root canal appts. last time I was pregnant with x-rays, and there were zero problems with my pregnancy and my son is perfect. I'm not worried. Well I hate the dentist so I'm a little worried lol!
     
  8. bunnyg82

    bunnyg82 Mum to 2 gorgeous boys

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    I guess it depends on where you are in the world to what advice the dentists are working from, but I had to have a filling. I rang the dentist to find out as it was scheduled for the week after I had found out I was pregnant. He said he would only do a temp filling. So I had no anasthetic or anything, just the temp filling and he said I'd have to go back after the baby was born.

    I would ring them and see what they advise x
     

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