Delaying vaccinations

Discussion in 'Baby Club' started by beanie, Feb 23, 2007.

  1. KX

    KX Well-Known Member

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    So is that different to the pneumoccocal?

    Jesus there are so many-Rebecca just got another appt thru for 5th March have no idea what this one is..

    **EDIT** Just checked it says "Hib/Men C". Is this a controversial one? Risks etc? :?
     
  2. beanie

    beanie Well-Known Member

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    Thats the new one. It is a different one to the pneumococchal one. I am not aware of any risks linked to it apart from those associated with iminnisations generally.

    Seren was getting appointments through constantly and I had no clue what they were for. She had the Haemophilus influenza type b (Hib) and meningitis C one but after that I just thouight that I wasn't sure what they were putting in my baby and why so that is why I am going to cancel her next appointment when it eventually comes through
     
  3. KX

    KX Well-Known Member

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    Quite right, they immunise right left and centre, and tbh I just let them and have no idea what it is. Bad I know.

    But I wont be so care free with the MMR. Think I will go for the separate immunisations.

    Thanks for the help Beanie :wink:
     
  4. beanie

    beanie Well-Known Member

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    I have just found this - these are the main changes to the immunisation programme

    Pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV) has been introduced into the immunisation programme. The first vaccine is at two months, the second at four months and a booster is given at about 13 months. A 'catch-up' programme is available for children aged under two who started on the old immunisation programme.
    The schedule for Haemophilus influenzae type b has been modified, with the addition of a booster immunisation at about 12 months, given as a single injection with meningitis C booster.
    The schedule for meningitis C has changed. Previously, three doses were given, one each at two, three and four months. Now, primary doses are at both three and four months, with a newly introduced booster at about 12 months given as a single injection with Haemophilus influenzae type b booster (see above).


    so the table is as follows

    Age of child Disease (and vaccine)
    2 months Diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, polio and Haemophilus influenzae type b (DTaP/IPV/Hib)
    Invasive pneumococcal disease (PCV)
    3 months Diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, polio and Haemophilus influenzae type b (DTaP/IPV/Hib)
    Meningitis C (MenC)
    4 months Diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, polio and Haemophilus influenzae type b (DTaP/IPV/Hib)
    Invasive pneumococcal disease (PCV)
    Meningitis C (MenC)
    About 12 months Haemophilus influenzae type b and Meningitis C (Hib/MenC)
    About 13 months Measles, mumps and rubella (MMR)
    Invasive pneumococcal disease (PCV))
    3 years 4 months to 5 years old Diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis and polio (DTaP/IPV or DTaP/IPV)
    Measles, mumps and rubella (MMR)
    13 to 18 years old Tetanus, diphtheria and polio (Td/IPV)
     
  5. KX

    KX Well-Known Member

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    That is quite a lot in the early years :shock:
     
  6. beanie

    beanie Well-Known Member

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    I know :(

    I have just been passed this link and am thinking about this.

    Spreading out the shots and decreasing the number of injections. As you can see, there are a lot of shots during the first two years of life, often three or four injections at one visit. This can be overwhelming for parents and quite an ordeal for babies. Here are some tips on how you can spread out the shots and decrease the overall number of injections. Ask your doctor about these options:

    1. Use a combination Hib/HepB in one injection. There is only one brand that makes this combination. Ask your doctor.

    2. There is a Hib vaccine that only requires 3 total shots, instead of 4. The six-month dose is skipped. This is the brand also used in the combination Hib/HepB above.

    3. There is one brand of DtaP/Hib that can be combined for the 4th dose at 18 months, but not the earlier doses.

    4. During the first two years, most of these shots don't have to be given at the exact above ages. They can be given over a wide range of months. Here are the options for altering the schedule during the first two years:

    Spread it out. Each shot should be given at least 6 to 8 weeks apart, except for HepB. (The first two doses can be one month apart – or longer).
    HepB. These three shots can be spread out at any time during the first two years. You don't have to start at one month. It can be safely delayed if you wish. The second and third doses must be 4 to 6 months apart.
    IPV (polio). These three shots can be given at any time, starting as young as 2 months of age, with the 3rd shot usually between 15 and 24 months.
    DtaP. These 4 shots can be given at any time, with the 4th shot usually between 18 and 24 months.
    Prevnar. These 4 shots can be given at a variety of times. Additionally, if you wait until your baby is over age one, he will only need one or two shots, instead of four (however, he goes without protection during the first year).
    Hib. Can be given at a variety of ages.
    MMR and Chickenpox. These can be given any time after the first birthday, and don't have to be given together.
    HepA. This does not have to be given at age two. You can delay this one for years.
    5. To avoid getting more than two shots at a time, ask your doctor if you can come in for some "shot only" visits in between your regular check ups. This can avoid giving your child as many as four injections at once. One drawback is that you are coming in for a greater number of painful episodes.

    6. If the number of shots during these first two years is simply overwhelming to you, the talk with your doctor about spreading them out over several years. The shots that you can safely delay (illnesses that your child has little or no risk of catching as an infant, or are not serious for infants) include Polio, Hep B, and Hep A. A note on Polio: it is not safe to delay this shot if you plan to live in or travel frequently to Africa and some other third world continents. You may also consider delaying the Chickenpox vaccine until your child is done with the rest of the infant immunizations (although delaying this does put your infant at risk of catching the illness). If you give the M-M-R components separately, start with the measles first after age one, then mumps at least one year later, then eventually rubella.

    from http://www.askdrsears.com/html/8/T085200.asp
     
  7. Yvonne

    Yvonne Well-Known Member

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    I agree there are alot of injections in the first 2 yrs of life but they must need them, lets face NHS aren't goin to waste money on stuff people don't need

    The first 2 yrs of a childs life is their most vunerable ones.

    Jack had the new Hib and men C jab on thursday and he will have the MMR in one jab next month. Get in all over and done with in one jab rather than giving him ANOTHER 3 seperate ones.

    Beanie i understand your cares hun, i hate taking jack for his jabs so i want it over and done in 1
     
  8. Hazel&Reece

    Hazel&Reece Active Member

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    I've totally forgot about the pneumococchal injection!!! Reece had a reminder for it before we moved last year, about October I think. Ooops I will have to make an appointment tomorrow. I hope it is ok for him to get it this late on :?
     
  9. beanie

    beanie Well-Known Member

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    that is one way of looking at it but there is also the alternative arguement that to vaccinate is a whole lot cheaper then to sort out the social conditions that contribute to many children being at risk of complications from measles, mumps etc etc :wink: sorry am playing devils advocate now

    hehe I can remember saying to my mum, "why cabn't I just have one big needle and get it over with" - I hated my jabs soo much.
     
  10. beanie

    beanie Well-Known Member

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    it should be hun.
     
  11. Yvonne

    Yvonne Well-Known Member

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    Your first statement about preventing it is true- sadly :cry:
    Oh how i wish it was all different
     
  12. beanie

    beanie Well-Known Member

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    Well we got her appt in for her MMR (for 7th March) but we have cancelled it and are going to take her to have her measles one in the next few months. Feel better now I have made a decision...thanks for your help :)
     
  13. Layla

    Layla Well-Known Member

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    Coby has his MMR and new men one today, i really dont wnat him to have them, im dreading it
     
  14. Tootsie

    Tootsie Well-Known Member

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    Please do not jump on me for what i am going to say.

    My two boys have had all of their jabs. MMR, Menigitic C, Hib, Diptheria etc.. I wouldnt dream of delaying the jabs, Or worse not letting them have them.

    My boys Grandad was never given his jabs by his mum (more coz she was lazy and couldnt be bothered to wait for him to have them done) but as his own children were born, and his grandchildren were born he came across the normal childhood illnesses, he regretted the whole thing of not having jabs, infact he resented his mother slightly, he couldn't go near the children most of the time for fear of catching something that would be more harmmfull to him than it was to the children. He even went out of his way to book appointments with the doctor to have some form of delayed jab in the end, as he didnt like being away from his children/granchildren.

    These jabs are there to help the immune system build up a defence against the actual illnesses. If they are not given early enough they can cause major ilnesses in later life. Chickenpox - Shingles in adults can cause infertility, if you have had chickenpox as a child you are around 80% less likley to get it as an adult. OK so they dont immunise against chickenpox but thats the reason why. If you get the chickenpox strain in your younger years it is safer for the children. I remember going to pox parties as a child, in the effort to make sure all the children caught the thing at the same time.

    Mumps are also better to get when you are a child, but measles and diptheria etc, are not nice at anytime in your life, that is why it is so important to immunisa against them. Immunisation will if all are treated, erradicate certain childrens viruses from life.

    I mean at the end of the day it is each to their own, and everyone has different ideas about it. This is just mine.
     
  15. Layla

    Layla Well-Known Member

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    oo, i didnt mean i didnt want him to have them, there is no doubt in my mind that he needs thema nd i wouldnt delay or stop him getting them, i meant that im dreading him having the jabs, i have never taken any of my kids to get theres, family members and friends have always done it while i sit in the waiting room, im such a wimp lol
    The MMR is a biggy so im so worried Coby will be in pain from it.

    xx
     
  16. Tootsie

    Tootsie Well-Known Member

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    Ahh sorry :oops: I think i got the wrong end of the stick then, but tbh children are very resilient when it comes to jabs, the main thing will be Calpol for the discomfort and he should sleep alot more, thats about it. Honestly the jab bit is fine you can even look away too if you need to.
     
  17. Layla

    Layla Well-Known Member

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    my friend has just offerd to take him in for me, so she can be the nasty one lol i will be ready and waiting in teh waiting roon to give him cuddles!

    At least there isnt anymore till school age so we can have a break.

    xx
     
  18. Tootsie

    Tootsie Well-Known Member

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    Yeah my youngest had his last one a while ago now. There not up again for Aaaaaagggggggeees :lol:

    although if i do manage another one it will be about a year or so :lol:
     
  19. Layla

    Layla Well-Known Member

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    well he has had then, not as bas as i thought, he was very brave!

    thought that was it bit he has to go back in a mont for more! :(

    xx
     
  20. beanie

    beanie Well-Known Member

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    they vaccinate against chicken pox in the states. I understand why the jabs are there, but whilst I will have her vaccinated for definate against measles am not convinced totally about the mumps and rubella. She will have her rubella at age 14 anyway if she has not had german measles - and her immunity would be better if she got them "normally" instead of through a vaccine as the vaccine is made of a weak strain. I know measles is the worst one and I don't want her to catch that but TBH if she gets german measles or mumps its not as dangerous. So those are the 2 I am undecided on. There is so much research out there suggesting all sorts - how the more immunisations we get the lower our immune system actually is, amongst others. Like you said each to their own. I am aware of the risks on both sides.

    Am glad Coby's went ok :)
     

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