~*Mamas of Reflux Babies*~

Discussion in 'Baby & Parenting' started by Nela, Oct 1, 2013.

  1. Nela

    Nela Mum of 1 + Expecting

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    Welcome to our little club of horrors!

    Errr.. I mean...

    :haha:

    Does your baby suffer from reflux issues? Come join us mamas with superhero attitudes and human abilities. Share your experiences, advice, lend an ear, grab a cuppa and unwind!

    Whatever you do, know that you are not alone. Dealing with such issues, especially when our little ones are so young, is difficult for all involved. It is excruciatingly painful and demanding, physically, mentally and emotionally. Don't take it all on yourself, and don't stay alone if you feel overwhelmed. We are here, we all are going through it and we all know very well how it feels.

    Oh and watch this:

    https://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013...p00000009&utm_hp_ref=fb&src=sp&comm_ref=false

    :flower:
    _________________________

    What it is:

    When referring to 'reflux' you have 2 things: 1) the verb 2) the condition. The verb 'reflux' simply means 'flow back'. Almost all babies reflux but not all babies have reflux, the condition. For babies that reflux happily, we usually call them 'happy spitters'. However, when you have a baby with the GER (gastro-eosophagal reflux) condition, these babies (and their parents) are anything but happy!

    In children with GER (or GERD which is the disease, meaning it is not short-term like GER), the contents of the stomach, including acid, reflux into the baby's esophagus. This causes discomfort and distress as it causes what we commonly know as 'heartburn'. When referring to 'Silent Reflux' this means that, instead of bringing it up and then vomiting it, the baby swallows it back down. This, in turn, makes it burn both coming up and going back down. Some children with GER have projectile vomiting as well.

    What are the symptoms:

    - Inconsolable crying.

    Crying, crying, crying, and more crying. That is usually the first thing that parents notice. Nothing you do seems to work longer than a few seconds, and it can last for hours, days, weeks, etc.

    - Choking

    The scariest of all the symptoms is the choking. Sometimes, the contents can flow back up to the mouth and nose and the baby chokes on it. It's unlikely your child will actually choke badly as most children just choke on it as though they had swallowed a sip of drink wrong but it is terrifying for the parent nonetheless. (If your child does this, turn your child on his/her side and rub their back gently, while giving a swift blow on their face.)

    - Gulping

    The classic symptom of silent reflux. Unlike just swallowing like when they are drinking, the gulping tends to have a higher-pitched sound. This is most oftentimes immediately followed by a grimace and then crying/screaming.

    - Arching

    Children will arch backwards, trying to elongate their esophagus and helping the discomfort of the reflux. This is often noticed during feeds but also at peak acid production time, usually about an hour or so after the feed. You'll most likely see lots of arching when having an 'episode'.

    - Anger/Flailing

    Babies tend to look (and perhaps actually are) like they are lashing out. They'll frantically flail about, waving their arms and legs about angrily. If you are holding them, do not be surprised if they claw and scratch at you. They'll thrash about, often 'throwing' themselves backwards in a desperate attempt to bring the acid down.

    - Anxiety/Food Aversions/Comfort Feeding

    Babies that experience pain often can also develop anxiety. Their anxiety is most oftentimes directly food-related. Some babies will go associate food with pain and go off their feeds. These are the babies that tend to lose weight. They tend to be much more easily diagnosed and doctors oftentimes take these cases more seriously as a healthy baby must put on weight. However, at the other end of the spectrum, some babies focus on the fact that, when drinking, they find it soothing and it helps bring the acid back down. These are your comfort feeders. The comfort feeders tend to put on weight much more rapidly and, because 'healthy babies put on weight' parents of comfort feeders often face the task of having to get the doctors to take their concerns more seriously. The extra trouble with comfort feeders is: more feed = more reflux and you can find yourself in a very vicious cycle very quickly. Other signs of anxiety especially during feeding and napping include: tightly clasped fists, frowning, pausing a long time during feeding to check how it feels, being extra clingy, being extremely tense.

    - Weight Loss/Weight Gain

    (see above)

    - Wet/Raspy breathing/ Upper Respiratory Infections/Wheezing/Hoarse Voice

    They sound and get congested from the irritation and reflux itself. Some babies can aspirate the reflux, leading to more serious infections.

    - Fighting Burping

    Some babies will fight you while you try to burp them. They'll arch and pull away. This is because the burping can often bring up the acid.

    - Hates Flat Positions

    Most, if not all, Reflux babies hate flat positions. Flat positions make it all too easy to bring up the contents of the stomach. They will scream and shriek if you put them down during an episode. This is a tell tale sign of reflux.

    - Aversion to 90 degree sitting

    Sitting 'too' upright can also cause reflux because the position creates added pressure on the tummy, thus making the reflux come up.

    - Hiccups

    Hiccups may sound cute... However, for a parent of a reflux baby, hiccups are usually a red flag which leave parents scrambling to their battle stations because they know the reflux is coming. Frequent, regular hiccuping after feeding is a common sign of reflux.

    - Coughing and Sneezing

    Babies cough and sneeze from the reflux and burning sensation.

    - Frantically Sucking/Gagging themselves

    Desperate to either swallow back to vomit the acid, babies will frantically suck and/or gag themselves. Babies will suck on basically anything, the most common thing being their fist. This is not your adorable thumb-sucking baby and the urgency behind it is noticeable.

    - Sleep Issues

    GER babies tend to have more difficulty sleeping because of the discomfort caused by the reflux. Some will wake frequently in the night if their reflux is very active then while others will sleep better at night out of sheer exhaustion. Waking up screaming is often a sign of a reflux episode.

    - Easily Over-Stimulated/Sensitive

    Babies with GER tend to be more tired than your average due to the lack of sleep because of the discomfort. This causes lights/noises, etc. to overstimulate and irritate them more than usual simply because they are tired and cranky.

    - Gassiness/Constipation

    Though most other sites do not list these as symptoms, I will add them here. Gas and/or Constipation will cause more pressure on the tummy, therefore making reflux worse.

    Also, it is my theory that some babies seem to have more of a digestive system issue as a whole, rather than only have GER. Doctors agree that gas and constipation create more pressure on the tummy, therefore making reflux worse. However, we do not always know what came first, especially when you are actually treating a reflux baby with thickening agents and/or medication. For some babies, the key tends to lie in the milk itself, especially formula-fed babies. For babies with immature/irritable digestive systems, some formulas may simply be too difficult to digest. (This makes sense since they say breastfed babies tend to have less reflux issues) Most people (including doctors) associate special formulas with children that have true allergies/intolerances but tend to overlook the fact that such formulas are usually much easier to digest as well.

    *Some babies suffer from Lactose Intolerance or CMPI/CMPA (cow milk protein intolerance or allergy)*

    These babies have very similar symptoms to reflux babies (and in fact, they get reflux from being unable to digest the milk). Symptoms that are more relative to these children include: diarrhea, blood in stool, rashes, and redness.

    **While some children may not be 'allergic' to anything in the formula, I tend to think that some babies just have an immature/irritable digestive system. For these children, sometimes, changing the formula to something easier to digest can make a world of difference.**

    What You Can Do:

    - Keep your child upright for at least 30mins after feeding. (However, I've been told stomach acid production peaks after an hour so I personally recommend an hour)

    Avoid 90 degree angles and flat positions. As mentioned above, true sitting positions increase the pressure on the tummy, encouraging the reflux, whereas laying flat makes the reflux too easy to go up and down. Angled, elongated positions are preferred. Being stretched out helps pass wind and relieve pressure on the tummy.

    - Avoid anything that encourages gas

    Gas WILL make reflux worse. Much worse in fact, because your baby will be suffering from pain from both the gas and the reflux at once, oftentimes causing them to become very distressed. Using proper anti-colic bottles (I personally use Dr. Brown's after hospital recommendation) and giving your child a dummy/pacifier/soother when upset, or immediately after feeding will reduce the air your child gulps, making them less windy. Formula fed babies should have nice, slow, and longish feeds. If breastfeeding, avoid very gassy foods (legumes, broccoli, cauliflower, etc.) and consider having your baby's latch/positions evaluated by a proper lactation consultant.

    - Pacifier/Dummy/Soother

    As mentioned above, these are a great tool for reflux babies. They help by: encouraging your baby to swallow and reduce the gag reflex during a reflux episode, distracting your baby from the discomfort, by reducing the wind they take in when crying, soothe the mouth and throat, provide the comfort feeder with that extra dose of comfort. My own kiddo is not an avid pacifier user. It's not something he loves all the time, but he LOVES it when an episode of reflux comes on. I dip his in cold (quite a bit colder than formula but not ice cold) water and give it to him immediately. He loves this and sometimes, he has gone as far as dozing off almost immediately as it's brought just enough comfort to help him doze through the discomfort. The water is nice because reflux babies spend a loooot of time crying and screaming, leaving their mouths dry. It also gives them something to actively suck, helping bring the acid back down.

    - Propping the bed/cots

    Now, this is important. Propping goes against SIDS recommendations so only do this under medical advice. However, if you want to test it out, the best way to do this is during a nap if you are awake and alert enough to stay awake throughout the entire time. For reflux babies, most doctors (some are against it) recommend propping the head of the bed/mattress at a 30 degree angle. This position helps avoid encouraging reflux, but also choking. Children should normally still sleep on their backs unless told otherwise. For my son, our doctors recommended some naps in his car seat and swing as well as raising all his mattresses. I've raised his temporarily with rolled towels and blankets but will be changing this. In order to stay more in line with SIDS guidelines, and after having discussed this with the doctor, I'll be raising the beds directly at the head (the feet of), rather than raising the mattress itself. This will make the whole bed angled, eliminating the 'pillow effect'.

    - Loose/Light Clothing

    Avoid any tight waistbands as these will increase the pressure on the tummy. I tend to buy my son's pants one size bigger (even if it's stretchy material) so that it's not too tight on him. I've noticed with mine, when he's screaming/having a fit, he tends to get very hot and sweaty quickly. Not only does this seem to increase his discomfort, if you do not notice and let him sleep in it, it increases the chance of catching chills.

    - Gentle Movement

    When having episodes, gentle movement seems to distract/comfort them. Walking around the house, popping them in their chairs for a stroll, etc. tend to help. Make sure the positions are neither flat, nor too upright.

    - Burping

    Burping is important but the way in which you do it is much more important. If your baby is using a proper anti-colic bottle, is drinking in a nice, slow, and longish (20/30mins for 4oz) manner, s/he may not need to be burped immediately after feeding.

    Again, avoid sitting positions, prioritize stretched out or angled positions instead. Sitting positions cause more pressure on the tummy, making the trapped wind more difficult to pass and making baby much more sore. Much more sore = much more crying = much more gulping air = much more gas = much more pressure= much more reflux.

    When having lots of gas:

    If you notice lots of wind but not too much reflux, you'll want to encourage passing the wind. You'll want to be slightly more aggressive than gentle in order to get it out. Whilst true that winding can increase reflux, not winding a windy baby will definitely bring on more intense reflux as you'll be fighting both at once and both will be extreme in terms of discomfort.

    Putting baby over your shoulder, with baby's tummy against your boob, and baby's arms right over your shoulder. Gentle patting, and lifting legs upwards a bit can help.

    Putting baby over your lap or cushion with baby's tummy pressed against lap or cushion, and legs gently tucked under or behind them, allowing them the ease of kicking themselves upwards. Keep a constant, rhythmic, but gentle enough pat on their bottom going. Don't worry about how long unless you are having major reflux signs such as gulping, sour face, etc.

    Gentle vibration can help. Just be careful that it's not too harsh as that too will worsen reflux.

    When having lots of reflux:

    Limit any sudden movement as much as possible (i.e. don't bounce up and down, don't put baby down, pick up, back down, etc., don't use strong vibration, etc.). Stretched out positions against your own body while walking around the house tends to help. Avoid any rigorous tapping, or stimulating for burps. Let the movement in your walk (you can add a subtle bounce to your step) and/or gentle sway soothe your little one.

    When not having any real signs of gas nor reflux:


    Propping baby against your body, over your shoulder but not held as tightly to avoid extra pressure on the tummy while gently patting bottom and/or rubbing back in circular motion.

    Simply walk around with baby in an elongated or angled position.

    - Avoid Over-Stimulation/Sensitivities

    Like I mentioned earlier, reflux babies are often more sleep-deprived (I doubt I have to convince parents this) than the average baby, making them much more sensitive, tired, and cranky. Young babies need their sleep and definitely get fussy when tired. Things like sound, light, smells, are stimulants and their brain tries to process everything it they encounter. This is a lot for them at such a young age and even the average baby gets overstimulated easily enough so imagine when a sleep-deprived one is bombarded by all this. If you notice your baby start flailing without really seeing any obvious signs of discomfort, rubbing his/her eyes, yawning, etc. those are your cues to help your little one to sleep. Take him/her away from the stimulating environment if you cannot make the environment itself less stimulating. A darker, quieter environment will help soothe them. Baby wearing and/or swaddling can be extremely handy when it comes to relaxing your little one after they've been overstimulated, especially if they have very active extremities as they will constantly startle/distract themselves with these.

    Treatment:

    Aside from all of the above, different formula, thickening agents, and medications might also be used to help treat your baby's reflux. All these things should be done only under medical advice so please talk to your healthcare professional if you think your baby is suffering from GER/D, allergies/intolerances, or digestive issues.

    Seeing The Doctor:

    If you child is incredibly fussy, is eating very little or very large amounts, seems in pain/discomfort more often than not, nothing you do seems to help, and you've noticed several of the symptoms, it is well worth seeing the help of a medical professional.

    Do be warned that medical help will not always be easy to get. Many parents report their concerns being disregarded and pretty much being fobbed off at first, myself included. The word 'colic' (I am cringing at the word - I DESPISE that word) might be thrown at you. The words 'first-time parents' and 'babies cry' will probably be spoken as well. However, if you feel in your gut that something is seriously wrong and your baby needs help immediately, don't be a pushover. There is nothing worse than knowing your child is suffering and being unable to do anything to console them. The impact reflux can have on babies and their families is so so underrated. One thing I recommend, sad as it is, is to film or have someone film your baby while s/he is having a fit. Sometimes, that is the only way for them to realize you aren't making a mountain out of nothing.

    As for myself, I was initially fobbed off by many people. However, I KNEW my son had it. One night, during a particularly intense episode, Nathan choked. Now, I knew this was most likely benign despite being downright terrifying and knew this was common with reflux babies. However, at that very moment, I told myself "Any normal mother would panic over this and rush their baby to the hospital when they choke..." That's when it clicked. That was what I used to go to the hospital and make them listen to me. He was diagnosed immediately as we were there a few hours and they could hear the reflux themselves.

    Helpful Links:

    https://www.silentinfantreflux.com/
    lots of useful info

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t3nens1NG8E
    descriptive video of symptoms (take or leave the treatment info, I just like the symptom descriptions)

    More coming soon
     
  2. KAMW

    KAMW Mum to Lily-Cho :D x

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    i think this group will stop us all going insane lol
     
  3. Nela

    Nela Mum of 1 + Expecting

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    Answering the questions from the other thread here so we can discuss them:

    Message from KAMW:

    "...well hopefully now we have people to talk to, we wont need to pull our hair out lol

    do you feel like you have enough support at home? x"


    Haha hopefully not! Otherwise we should rename the group to "bald mummies unite" :haha:

    As for your question... Hmmm that is a tough one to answer! I *do* have a lot of support in the sense that family members have offered to come by and watch him while I sleep, go out, etc. However, I don't feel right leaving him if he's not well. I feel that my role as his mum is to be there, even if I can't exactly make it all better. We have good care here so we are getting quite a bit of professional support as well. However, the support is limited in the sense that, well, they don't want to give the medicine (Dutch are not fond of medicine much at all!) so they'll show you tips and methods to try but basically you are still left on your own to deal with the screaming, sore baby. :wacko: They say they will make sure it all gets better, but when you tell them that you're still having problems, the answer you get is "Time is a great healer". Whilst I agree with that, it doesn't solve anything in the immediate and seeing your child like that for hours at a time is just horrible. So that's my answer. :haha:

    _________________________________

    Message from JessyG:

    "Nela can i ask what your sons symptoms of silent reflux are? i am realky unsure as to whether my little girl has it. "

    - Spitting up, multiple times after feed, for several hours later. Basically, it was almost an all day thing. What really triggered my suspicions was the fact that he would make a face and cry before and after spitting up. I have dealt with many babies and didn't remember babies getting upset about spitting up unless it was trapped wind.

    - Crying after burping.

    - The gulping sounds he'd make. He was clearly swallowing reflux but I didn't realize it was that until I really suspected reflux.

    - Constantly needing to suck, in a ravenous/enraged manner. He'd try swallowing his fist a lot, in a grumpy way too.

    - Hiccups. Every. Dang. Feed. And he'd get massively grumpy every time they'd start up. At first, we thought it was cute (the sound is cute) and thought he was just a bit annoyed with them. I mean, I get annoyed with my own hiccups!

    - Stretching and throwing himself backwards when he was on my shoulder. He definitely looked uncomfortable.

    - 'Climbing' but especially clawing... When he'd be on my shoulder, he'd actually hurt me by being in so much pain and discomfort that he'd 'lash out' and would claw at me and climb/kick, etc.

    - Twisting. He looked like he was in pain and just was twisting all kinds, not knowing how to get comfy.

    - Crying, Screaming, Screeching. I've heard babies cry. This isn't your normal baby's cry. This is over-the-top crying, with screaming and screeching thrown in. You couldn't hear it and not assume he was in pain.

    - Constant hunger. He was insatiable. No matter if he had JUST had his bottle, he needed more. Giving him more caused him to spit up more, want more again, spit up again, want more, and round and round we went. *Many babies develop an aversion to food, some do the comfort feeding like my son. A baby who won't feed will lose weight and are generally easier to diagnose as it's more 'in-your-face'. Nathan comfort feeds but is 'cautious' when feeding. You can see him hesitate as he drinks. (As explained by his doctor, I'm not the baby whisperer yet lol)

    - Tension/Anxiety. He no longer slept peacefully. He looked troubled. His hands were constantly tightly clenched, he was always stiff. He never looked relaxed anymore. This was a big red flag for me.

    *Edited to add:

    - Gagging and coughing. I didn't really pay attention, to be honest. I thought he was just drinking too quicklyor not swallowing properly.

    - Not wanting to lie down. Being flat made the reflux worse. At first, I thought he was developing a 'clingy' phase, wanting more attention but that wasn't it.

    I think those are the main things. No matter what we did, he was/is inconsolable when the reflux was/is acting up. I hope your little girl doesn't have it as well. :nope:
     
  4. Nela

    Nela Mum of 1 + Expecting

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    I thought I would share this video... When I came across it, I just knew in my heart that that is what Nathan has. I don't endorse whatever treatments she mentions (that's not her main point anyway) but I think the descriptive parts are great.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t3nens1NG8E

    Btw, one of the reasons he got diagnosed was because he started choking and stopped breathing for a few so we rushed him to Emergency Care.
     
  5. JessicaM123

    JessicaM123 Well-Known Member

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    My lo began with silent reflux, dropped centiles and was a generally unhappy chappy. He's on infant gaviscon now, but it has become normal reflux and he is now a happy chucker. Its great to see him out of pain, but hes sick at least 30 times a day. i cant ever carry him into shops as he will projectile, and now we are weaning it smells so gross, i smell of sick 24/7!!! just riding it out, my cousins baby was the same and he grew out of it on his own about 14mo.

    What i will say though is weaning didn't work for us and i began to wean at 5mo. Therefore if your wanting to wean early because of reflux, only 33% of babies reflux will improve. another 3rd stay the same, and the rest reflux gets worse!! we've stayed the same i would say.
     
  6. Nela

    Nela Mum of 1 + Expecting

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    I sure hope so! LOL. How are you doing there? How long has your LO been diagnosed?
     
  7. Nela

    Nela Mum of 1 + Expecting

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    Glad to hear he is feeling better! Projectile vomiting must suck for sure though. I've heard they can really send that nastiness flying! :wacko: Nathan doesn't spit up much at all anymore with the thickened feed but he had started a small projectile vomit by the tome he was diagnosed. Sorry to hear about the smell. You must have to clean up a lot :wacko: I'm guessing he wears a bib? Or have you given up and now all wear rain gear? :haha: I hope he grows out of it soon! :flower:
     
  8. JessyG

    JessyG cautiously pregnant #1

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    I think she does have it. Does your lo pass a lot of wind and look uncomfortable with it. she has all of those except the vomiting. She very rarely vomits and she will sometimes sleep peacefully but other times she wakes up crying and gulping. she doesnt scream thay much but looks so uncomfy most of the time. maybe she has it quite mild but i certainly want to try gaviscon as the gripe water we were told to try does bugger all. thanks i am going to see doc tomorrow for a prescription.
     
  9. Nela

    Nela Mum of 1 + Expecting

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    Ah sorry to hear. Reflux sucks. My son does have a lot of wind and it's always quite difficult to pass. That's one of the reasons why I thought it was trapped wind for a long time. However, I also knew that we had taken loads of measures to cut the wind so I did find it a bit odd. Hopefully, your doctor can assist you well. Nathan is actually not medicated at the moment. We thicken his feeds with carob flour as per doctors orders (so I'm not trying to be some sort of natural health expert or anything of the sort) and that has helped a lot. We also have a ton of other non-medical things like raising the beds, massage, swaddling, etc. to do. Let us know how it goes! :flower:
     
  10. lilesMom

    lilesMom Well-Known Member

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    My lo has silent reflux. It's a night mare
    I feel so bad for him.
    My making him.laugh is even enough to cause it.
    Doh !!
     
  11. Smanderson

    Smanderson Well-Known Member

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    Hi ladies,

    My DS has GERD and is on domperidone, losec and gaviscon he is 5 months and still not grown out of it. Terrible sleeper, eater and pretty fussy, prefers to be held (still) and generally pretty difficult. However, now he smiles and plays he is easier in some ways and I love him to pieces but it has been a very rocky road and I'm glad to find somewhere with others going through similar experiences as

    I have been told by a couple of mothers that he is only fussy because I'm over anxious! Others scoff when I say he screams and say he's always fine when they see him! :grr: makes me feel like showing a video of him screaming except I can't bring myself to watch it let alone show someone else to justify his condition! I only took it a the docs could see so they could help us better...this resulted in him being admitted for 24 hours observations and increase in all meds and dietitian review for early weaning.

    Anyway, I am determined his reflux will not define him or his babyhood or our relationship but I am also grateful for support and understanding so thank you for starting this thread :flower:
     
  12. mush23

    mush23 Well-Known Member

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    My dd has been diagnosed with GERD and is on domperidone and ranitidine and we've just started aptamil reflux milk. She needs regular weigh ins so we can ajust medication with
    weight gains. The medicine didn't seem to work 100% dd seemed a little better but still wasn't totally happy and was still very vomity so we started the new milk. Since then she's not vomited once not even a spit up! :O but she still hiccups and screams every now and then. Although my dh and mum are great support I still feel very down. I see these mums with "normal" babies and just wish dd was like that. I know if she was she wouldn't be my beautiful daughter though. Some times I really do feel like leaving her out side the police station and walking away but that though just makes me feel even worse! Having a reflux baby is some thing only other reflux mums can understand that shrill scream of pain is heart breaking :( I think this thread is good for us mums to know we're not alone. It'll be nice to have someone to talk to and calm me down or at least to insane with me hahahahaha
     
  13. sezzolou

    sezzolou Well-Known Member

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    It's interesting reading others lo's symptoms and seeing the similarities. Thought I would share my boys symptoms...

    He gulps alot while not drinking, while awake or asleep then will do a high pitched intake of breathe, followed by inconsolable crying and fist in mouth. This is the acid coming up which is uncomfortable.

    Strong hiccups and sneezing after every bottle. He has never had a problem drinking his bottles, instead he gulps it down and tends to want to comfort eat to soothe his throat.

    He gets really bad nasal congestion at night time and spends all night grunting and fidgeting, worse if he is lying on his back rather than side or front. He also throws his arms up in the air alot. Night time coughing and gagging.

    He passes excessive amounts of wind which is uncomfortable for him but I'm not sure if this is anything to do with reflux.

    He hates lying on his back and being burped.

    He was generally an unhappy baby whenever he was awake before changing to reflux milk and starting ranitidine but he is slowly improving.

    Main issues that remain are congestion which disrupts his sleep alot and passing wind. He's lessened the grunting, fidgeting and gasping for air that he was doing and is more smiley which is great. He's 13 weeks and I feel I'm only just starting to enjoy him as hes been such a challenge so far.

    Forgot to add...I'd taken him to the Drs numerous times to be told all of this is normal and that its normal for babies to cry for hours on end! Finally got listened to when I saw a different Dr, it had got to the point where you could smell the acid on his breath though :-(
     
  14. sezzolou

    sezzolou Well-Known Member

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    Awww, he also really hates the pram :-( I get so envious when I see other mums walking their content sleepy babies...my lo just screams if I take him out in the pram. I'm going to a sling meeting tomorrow to see which ones we like as he's much happier in a carrier and its a good way of getting him to nap if he's having a bad day!
     
  15. Nela

    Nela Mum of 1 + Expecting

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    Reflux really is a nightmare. Sometimes I wonder if I'll get to hear him laugh since he's always so miserable... :cry:

    I am fighting like heck here because they don't want to give him the medicine. The pediatrician apparently (we have not seen him directly yet :growlmad:) said that the medicine doesn't really work and that only time will fix it. I bet if they were the ones dealing with a screaming child day and night they would be a little more open to trying things! :growlmad: They've even diagnosed him as having severe acid reflux as the pediatric nurse witnessed a bit of an 'episode' so it's not like it's just a lil spitting up like other normal babies have and I am freaking out about it. All we have is carob flour to thicken his feed. The rest is just non-medical. :shrug: The worst part is, now with the thickening, he's constipated so we have to deal with him screaming about that as well. When he's not screaming, I try to make his days fun for him only to find out I've been making him scream more due to overstimulation. I feel like I just can't win. Dealing with a baby like this is enough to stress anyone but to be told, like you, that I am causing it by being anxious... Ha, the next person that tells me that will be buried 6ft under ground. The last time someone said it I got really angry, threw up my arms and said "Fine, if I'm the problem then I will leave. You fix it. See if you can stop it then!" And well, lo and behold, Nathan started up and there was nothing that person could do to make it better. Oh but it's my fault. *Rolls eyes* Okay, vent done. I think... Phew. :cry: Lol.

    Btw, I also filmed him. I got so upset with everyone telling me he's fine, telling me it's colics, or telling me he's a baby and that it was cute that I, as a first time mum, needed to learn what having a baby meant. I was just bloody furious and finally showed the home visiting nurse and she knew right away it was not normal. It's heartbreaking to have to film your baby in pain, and then to watch it, as though you don't have enough to deal with when it's happening live. Gosh though, I don't want to think of where we'd be now if I hadn't filmed it and fought with people to listen to me. :nope: I certainly don't blame you for not wanting to watch it! :hugs:

    I hear you. I feel the same. I *have* support but it's just not the same. As a mum, you just cannot help but wish this weren't happening. There's always worse things to deal with, of course, but I think we can all agree that seeing our little ones in pain, no matter the cause, just isn't something a mum wants to deal with. I certainly can sympathize about wanting to leave kiddo at the police station. I seriously caught myself wondering about whether I should have had this child, whether I should sign over all my rights to OH and just run for the hills, etc. Not that I ever truly would consider it in my heart. But you get torn between loving your kiddo to death, and then hating the exasperation and powerlessness that you experience with this whole ordeal. I have to go see my healthcare provide now because I'm starting to worry about my aggression. :cry: If there's anything to make a mum feel like crap it's to catch herself feeling aggressive towards her baby. I have help coming today. I cannot do it alone anymore. His nurse is coming over tomorrow as well and I will discuss where we go from here with her. It's difficult not to feel bitter towards the situation and want better. Every cry of pain hurts us as well. Other people won't understand that. :cry: :hugs:

    Yep yep, I recognize all that you said. Especially the gulping the bottle down. Nathan would be feeding 24/7 if he could. He's no longer spitting up so they keep telling me he's better but he's so miserable and screaming all the time that I know he's not. No one listens though. I think they seriously are testing how far they can push me before I threaten them. The congestion, the high pitch gasping, etc. It's all there. I love how often you are told all this is 'normal'. :dohh: Really happy you are able to start enjoying your time with your lil one more now though. I really hope it will keep moving forwards and get easier with each day!

    Aww that's too bad about the pram. Mine is the opposite, he actually loves him and tends to fall asleep very quickly so now I have decided to just pop him in when he's fussy. Nit an instant cure with reflux but seems to distract him. I hope he'll love the sling and carrier! :flower:
     
  16. lilesMom

    lilesMom Well-Known Member

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    SeezoLou what age is ur munchkin
    I changed lo to buggy after asking doc at 3 months.
    She said it was fine cos he is a big baby . He is much better
    He hated his pram too.
    Also I got a humidifier for his room and nasosal drops for his nose.
    Both help a bit. Congestion.isn't gone but is better .
    Xx
     
  17. lilesMom

    lilesMom Well-Known Member

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    Nela hugs honey. Xx
    Ur docs are right and wrong ;-)
    Med doesn't cure but it helps lo and our lives a lot inmeantime
    Ur so right. It's easy for doc to say it's fine when they don't hve to care for lo.
    Hugs. Try and keep in mind its not forever. Xx
    Hard I know.
    I feel the same with Simon. Sometimes he is happier if he does get sick
    Cos what was bothering him is gone.
    When I was using carobel his nappies and wind were horrendous.
    His reflux was a bit better but the price was too high foe him.
    Anti reflux milk didnt agree with him either.
    Zantac has helped a lot.
    He is a happier chappie in it ;-)
     
  18. lilesMom

    lilesMom Well-Known Member

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    Also not meaning to ooffend u but i.presume u hve pram elevated? Xxx
     
  19. Smanderson

    Smanderson Well-Known Member

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    Nela that's awful they won't medicate it certainly does help!!! My gp was no help but peadeatrician at A&E were fab! Maybe you could try A&E? People are so ignorant to reflux but there are lots of us out there so hopefully we can support each other :)

    Lilesmom that's interesting about the humidifier might have yo get one, what one do you use? Do you use every night? How foes it help? Sorry I just not heard of this before, anything to help my lil man!!

    We had a scary day! He chocked on his puke in the car seat I had to stop in the road grab him out and hold him so he could puke it out! Rushed to docs for them to say he's fine now!!! Frightening :( no sleep for us tonight!
     
  20. mush23

    mush23 Well-Known Member

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    Thank you so much! Its nice to know im not alone with these feelings :cry: Ive got my 8 week postnatal check up tomorrow and will be bringing it up with the doctor, i feel so down which makes me feel like an even worse mum and i dont want feeling down and angry to grow in to full blown pnd :nope: i want to be the best mummy i can be to my precious baby girl :happydance:
    On a brighter note if anyone has tried reflux milk and stopped using it because it caused consitpation i was advised to break it in slowly, for example my dd drinks 6oz so for a couple of days uses 5 scoops of your regular milk and 1 scoop of reflux milk then 4:2, 3:3 ect ect so that los system has time to adjust. I thought this was amazing advice as the reflux milk worked like magic but caused constipation after just 3 bottles. Im starting with the new method in the morning so ill keep every one up dated :thumbup:
    remember mummies your not alone!:hugs:
     

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