Moving Out Experiances

Discussion in 'Teen Pregnancy' started by AndyyMay, Jan 25, 2011.

  1. AndyyMay

    AndyyMay Well-Known Member

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    Hey Girlies!
    Hope Your All Okay:)

    I had my little girl 2 weeks ago...and am now concidering moving out as my current home is just not the best condition for my little girl..especially for her to be crawling in a few months time.

    I was just wondering if you could give me some of your experiences ...how it is for oyu? if you find it hard? how old you are and who your living with?

    And if your on any benefits..what benefits your on and does that cover everything for you.

    basically how is it coping moving out?

    Cheers for replies:)
    xx
     
  2. lucy_x

    lucy_x Mummy To Two Stunners

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    Moving out isnt easy.
    A life on benefits is hard.
    It doesnt cover everything.

    Sorry didnt mean for that to sound rude, But having a house is expensive!
    I live with my OH and sister, so i dont get lonely. But even with 3 of us it was difficult to pay the rent ect...
     
  3. Yazz_n_bump

    Yazz_n_bump Me, Fiancé & Jack! :)

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    Basically moving out is hard, what lucy_x said.
    Monthly bills are around 800-900 a month. That's with our mortgage being VERY low at £400 per month.
    You'll need to save up a lot of money to move out also, as you'll have to buy everything like sofa, tv, mircowave, to the very basics like a kettle - for us to get the basic housey stuff it cost us just over £1,300 and we still need to buy things like a washing line and a hoover lol which isn't cheap either.
    Moving out on benefits although me and OH don't claim them is a lot lot harder, I know people who have had children and lived on benefits they litterarly scraped through they couldn't go out or treat themselves or anything till they managed to both get jobs and get off benefits.
    I'm not trying to put you don't but benefits do not cover everything - you'll have to find the money to cover the bills that don't get paid like the rest of the rent, phone bills, water/electric/gas bills, etc.

    So my advice is to save up a lot of money first say at least £1,000 to cover the expensives of buying house bits and also you might be left with a bit of money to cover your first set of bills. Don't move without any money because you will struggle.
     
  4. tasha41

    tasha41 Mum & Dad + 1

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    I haven't found moving out to be too hard, but definitely not as easy as living at home. Less hands to help, more jobs for me. The main thing I struggle with is keeping the house clean! I have a lot on my plate and something has to give, that's what it is in our house. It'd be much better if OH helped :growlmad:

    Finances are manageable, adjustments have been made, but I pretty well can afford what I want, it just sometimes takes some saving and planning, budgeting..

    I'm 21, 22 this fall and living with my OH who is 22, 23 in the summer.

    Not on any benefits, just getting 'baby bonus' which is I guess like tax credits somewhat.

    Tips on moving out.. I guess I'd say save as much as you possibly can, I had about $5,000 saved. We bought a house and OH put down the down payment and handled those costs, but wasn't left with much for furniture, thankfully our fridge, stove, washer, dryer and a freezer were included. When we got the place we did a massive clean sweep, scrubbed walls, counters, floors, cupboards, appliances..

    We spent about $3,000 on furniture: a new couch, love seat, chair, bed, 2 dressers, night stand, mattress & box spring. I would have had to spend money on a dining room set but my friend had one she was getting rid of, so it's not in the best condition but I got that. Then my parents paid for my LO's new dresser. We had a TV I had from home for a few months then bought a new one, our dryer died so we also bought a new washer and dryer set after about 4 months living here.

    Paint, curtain rods, blinds, curtains can be a big expense.

    I got my plates at Ikea, we won a toaster oven, my parents gave us an old toaster and kettle, his parents gave us an old George Foreman grill and a love seat, his friend gave us an entertainment center, I left my coffee table from my bedroom @ my mum's at her place when I left so they bought me 2 end tables, aside from that decorations, furniture, etc have been slowly purchased whatever we can afford month by month. We didn't have a microwave even for like 6 months, we managed without but it's so convenient to have now!

    Make a list of what you need, and cross things off as you go.. everything- towels, lamps, plates, utensils, pans, etc. Let relatives/friends know you're looking for things since people are usually looking to get rid of SOMETHING, and it'll be a start until you can afford to replace it with something new.
     
  5. _laura

    _laura Mummy to Monster Max

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    We were fortunate enough to have our parents pay for the deposit on our rent.
    We get housing benefit because our wages don't cover our rent, bills, council tax, food, car insurance, phone contracts, petrol and max's things
    Also get child tax credits and child benefits

    Luckily our place was furnished so we only had a few things to get like a toaster, hoover, microwave etc. But on the other hand it means that we have to leave it all when we move out.

    At the moment we are saving to buy things to store to keep at my mums for when we move into our own place and saving for a down payment on a house.
    We have 2 years to save for it. Oh and we're saving to pay our parents back along with student loans aswell :dohh:
     

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